• Treasuring detritus: Reflections on the wreckage left behind by artistic research

      Pinchbeck, Michael; Jones, Rhiannon; University of Derby; University of Lincoln (Taylor & Francis, 2019)
      In 2006, Rhiannon Jones and Michael Pinchbeck exhibited fragments from their ongoing practice as research as part of an exhibition at the Surface Gallery (Nottingham). Pinchbeck showed 365 objects wrapped in brown paper and string from a project called The Long and Winding Road that involved driving a car around the country for five years as a venue for one-to-one performance (the car was later immersed in the River Mersey and then crushed before being discarded in Michael Landy’s Art Bin). Jones was showing a video called Archived Actualities that re-traced the routes of 1000 scar stories; accidents shared with her by members of the public. Jones suggests that scars are innately performative through a collision of dialogic triangulation that takes place between the rupturing of skin, the process of scarification and the architectural shifts to sites of accident. This five-year project resulted in a solo exhibition in the UK and the USA where scar story objects were collected and displayed in a gallery context, donated by people who had contributed to the archive, as their stories were retold through a series of live performance works. As part of Pinchbeck’s project, the 365 objects were belongings left behind by his brother, who died in an accident in 1998. The piece explored the invisible scars left behind by grief and the literal baggage that makes manifest loss. The objects that were wrapped up lost their emotional charge until they were revealed again during the crushing of the car at the end of the journey, the emotional wreckage becoming literal, memories mangled like the car that housed his brother’s story. For this article, both writers reflect on the detritus of their practice as research, and how in some way, Pinchbeck’s car and Jones’ scar archive ‘stage the wreckage’ of the events that triggered them. The article explores traces that are embedded into our public presentation of self and other, and are objectified through the act of conversation, in order to ask if objects can carry scars like people carry memories. The article asks what remains after physical and emotional wreckage and proposes that instead of seeing this as sediment of loss we should treasure the detritus. Jones still has the objects donated to her archive that embody the stories she was told. Pinchbeck no longer has the 365 objects his brother left behind or the car that carried them on their journey.
    • Something’s gone wrong again

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Giovanni Aloi, 2017-11)
    • The hands of Beuys and Heidegger

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Whitechapel Gallery/ MIT Press, 2016)
    • Beyond batched taxidermy

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (David Winton Bell Gallery, 2015-01-23)
    • Sztuka wspolczesna i prawa zwierzat

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Wydawnictwo Instytutu Badań Literackich PAN, 2015-01-01)
    • A poetics of graphic design?

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Occasional Papers, 2012-04-04)
    • Steve Baker: Fieldwork

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (University of Sheffield, 2019)
    • Dead, dead, dead, dead, dead.

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Routledge, 2014-04-24)
    • Five heraldic animals (for Eduardo Kac)

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-03)
    • Foreward

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Lantern Books, 2015-03)
    • Roadside

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Museum Ostwall im Dortmunder U, 2014)
      The animals driven to death on the roads remain lying until the tires are all to remove mortal remains, dedicated to the art historian, researcher, author and artist Steve Baker in his roadkill series. Baker started when he got one run over rabbits on a country road in Norfolk / UK saw. This impression occupied him so much back then that after half mile back to the accident site. He leaned over his bike so he did that animal could directly record from above with his camera. In the same formal rigor, with a view from above on the dead animals and the since then, bicycle pedals have made Baker his depressing recordings.
    • Scapeland

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Polish Sculpture Center, 2014)
      Publication accompanying the exhibition held at the Center of Polish Sculpture in Orońsko from March 8 to June 15, 2014. Both the catalog and the exhibition bring closer the problem of animal subjectivity and individuality as well as the relationship between humans and animals. Colorful photographs are accompanied by Dorota Łagodzka's text and a list of presented works.
    • Horizons

      Hall, Mark; University of Derby (SACI Florence, 2016-06-04)
    • Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Sheffield (2013-12-06)
      Funded by the ESRC as a studentship ‘Art, Maternal and Matrixial Encounters’ is my PhD thesis. The opening paragraphs contextualise the research: ‘Ten years ago I saw the art-practice of French born artist Louise Bourgeois. I had come across her work before, but this time it was different. This time something happened. Viewing the work had an effect on me that I had not experienced before. I was drawn to the images and moved by them. I was mesmerised by the sensations that beholding the work was able to ignite in me. I was a newly single mother in my mid-twenties when this happened. I was in the midst of a traumatic time in my trajectory, a time where I felt lonely and lost. Louise Bourgeois' work was something I felt connected to, it made me feel differently about myself and my situation. Over time, I would come to think and refer to this happening as an encounter, it being an event that marked a tipping point in life. This encounter with Louise Bourgeois' oeuvre, this event that catalysed change is the starting point for this research….The feelings, the intensity, the sensations all worked in a way that was new and exciting. I could not let go of this 'happening'. I wanted to understand it, make sense of it and learn from it. At the time of this early encounter with Bourgeois' oeuvre I was in a distraught post-natal state, I felt that Bourgeois', art in a complex way that I did not understand, connected to my maternity. The complex connection to my maternity, both in terms of the reference to the maternal in the images and to how they made me feel is an important aspect of how I experienced Bourgeois' practice from the outset. When I first started to contemplate what this experience, this happening, might be, thinking of it as an encounter – an art encounter. At the time I was ignorant of this concept's use in philosophical and psychoanalytic texts that I would later discover and use when I embarked on this research. I started reflecting on my experience as an encounter, because when I discovered the work of Louise Bourgeois it constituted an unexpected event that I would credit with catalysing a turning point in my life. Once I started this research my understanding of encounter changed, as did my understanding of the encounter I experienced with the practice of Louise Bourgeois. Following the encounter with Bourgeois' art I read about, (among other uses of the concept of encounters) art encounters in the work of Simon O'Sullivan4 and maternal encounters in the work of Lisa Baraitser, which explore ideas and thinking that art encounters and maternal encounters respectively can potentially have a transformative affect/effect on subjectivity. Both of these books, along with others, which will be explored in the main text, informed how I came to think of the term encounter. The point of raising their use and influence at this stage is to alert the reader to the use specifically of the term art-encounter from the outset as stemming from my initial tacit use of the term encounter to think of my experience of the work of Louise Bourgeois, which would later be informed by reading around art and other encounters. I use it then to literally describe this experience, as well as exploring what an art-encounter is in more general terms as I work-through my art-encounter throughout this thesis. This research is one outcome of a process of contemplation that I engaged in to try and understand and make sense of this art-encounter. My art-encounter is thus not only used to locate the origins of this research; it is also invoked as a heuristic device to explore encounters beyond the scope of my art-encounter experience. This exploration continues to use my art-encounter, in part, as a case-study to consider, in the first instance, art-encounters' possible capacity for subjective transformation. Part of the contemplation of my art-encounter, which will be explored in more detail in different places throughout this thesis, was a consideration of the place of my maternal experience in the naming of the art-encounter with the work of Louise Bourgeois. The investigation into my art-encounter thus involves a teasing out of the place of maternal experience in this encounter; and, once again, using this experience, or the contemplation of this experience as a heuristic device within this research. In the process of deciphering the place of my maternal experience in the conditions and causes of my art-encounter I explore the potential of using traumatic maternal experience as a site of knowledge in and of itself. The process of inquiry into my art-encounter, and exploration of the place of my maternal experience in this encounter works towards revealing some insight into the conditions and characteristics of possible subjectivising encounters. This short narrative serves to introduce the research and provides some explanation for the two research questions, below, in terms of the issues embedded into the first, and then to the issues explored through the second: How can we understand an art-encounter's capacity for subjective transformation? When the invocation of traumatic maternal experience is explored as site of knowledge in the context of an art-encounter, what new insights might emerge into the conditions and characteristics of potentially subjectivising encounters?’
    • Nightbreed - the cabal cut

      Cherrington, Russell; University of Derby (Seraphim Films / Morgan Creek Films, 2017-12-01)
      Nightbreed is a 1990 Fantasy/Horror Film created by Polymath Clive Barker. In 2012 Russell Cherrington with the aid of Jimmi Johnson took all the available film elements, work prints, original cinema release and the 2nd draft script. The question was can the film be recreated and would it have an impact and a meaning in 2012. The finished film was screened at over 50 Film Festivals around the world from 2013 to 2015. It led to the Occupy Midian movement with over 10,000 follwers on Twitter, Facebook and the Internet. The film was restored into a Directors Cut in 2015 and finally in 2017 the Cabal Cut was released on Blu Ray.
    • The archaea (2017).

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2017-03-24)
      The Archaea’ features a series of constructed photographic tableaux of tangled, botanical phantasmagoria, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of figuration. Inspired by the ‘Jungle paintings’ of Max Ernst and alluding to Ballardian themes of Nature’s retribution, the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous. The high-contrast, backlit, large scale photographs are created in the studio and subsequently manipulated with a digital technique; used here to denote an underlying molecular structure redolent of microscopic photography. This serves to enforce a link between animal and vegetable but also lends the work a painterly quality, paradoxically at odds with the photographic medium. The resulting imagery emits a dreamlike quality that induces the pareidolic illusion latent in the human Psyche, this anthropomorphism further reinforcing the Archean molecular link between everything that exists. All plants, animals and humans, are biologically connected and this genetic inheritance can be traced back to the human brain and spinal column. The split between animals and plants on the Phylogenetic tree occurred around 1.6 million years ago, however with some plant species we still share as much as 75% genetic similarity.
    • The archaea (2015).

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2015-09-15)
      Archaea’ refers to the kingdom of single celled organisms with the simplest known molecular structure, thought to be the closest living ancestor to the origin of all life on earth. ‘The Archaea’ features a series of constructed photographic tableaux of tangled, botanical phantasmagoria, which refer to the landscape with a suggestion of figuration. Inspired by the ‘Jungle paintings’ of Max Ernst and alluding to Ballardian themes of Nature’s retribution, the resulting images succeed in being both menacing and simultaneously humorous. The high-contrast, backlit, large scale photographs are created in the studio and subsequently manipulated with a digital technique; used here to denote an underlying molecular structure redolent of microscopic photography. This serves to enforce a link between animal and vegetable but also lends the work a painterly quality, paradoxically at odds with the photographic medium. The resulting imagery emits a dreamlike quality that induces the pareidolic illusion latent in the human Psyche, this anthropomorphism further reinforcing the Archean molecular link between everything that exists. All plants, animals and humans, are biologically connected and this genetic inheritance can be traced back to the human brain and spinal column. The split between animals and plants on the Phylogenetic tree occurred around 1.6 million years ago, however with some plant species we still share as much as 75% genetic similarity.
    • The archaea: painting digital photography.

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing., 2018-09-01)
      How does one make a photographic body of work about Deep Ecology; the philosophy that considers humans to be equal to and no more important than any other species, advocating a radical re-adjustment of the relationship between humans and nature? This was the question I asked myself when I began a photographic project in 2014 entitled The Archaea. My interest stems from exploring the ecological relationship between humanity and the earth, and there are many sub-fields of psychology emerging to study these effects, such as eco-psychology or conservation psychology.
    • Across the decades (60 years).

      Basi, Philip Ranjit; University Of Derby (2016-08)
      2015 was the 60th year that the Derby West Indian Community Association (DWICA) has been delivering services to the Black and Culturally Diverse Community. DWICA acknowledged that the “DIAMOND” anniversary this was a milestone that should be celebrated. Through a funding application process DWICA successfully secured project financial resources from Heritage Lottery Fund to deliver a project called “Across the Decades” which showcased the achievements made by DWICA over the past sixty (60) years. This project was the foundation for the organisation to collated and document it’s’ legacy detailing the contributions made by the pioneering African Caribbean community coming to the city Derby, in the main from the Caribbean. In addition document the following (2nd & 3rd) generation’s contribution towards community development in Derby.