Welcome to the Digital and Material Artistic Research Centre.

At D-MARC the focus of our research is on an understanding of the shifting boundaries and new relationships between traditional arts disciplines, which have been created by new technologies. We explore the creative potential of hybrid forms made possible by digitalisation, and are also concerned to develop theoretical and pedagogic understandings capable of keeping pace with, and informing, technological developments.

Recent Submissions

  • Proximity Collective

    Howard, Rebecca; Atkinson, Anne-Marie; Haynes, Jackie; Hall, Antony; Charragher, Ann; Joy-Ford, Sarah; Abingdon Studios, Blackpool; University of Derby (2021-08-26)
    Proximity Collective (artist group, established in 2019) explore the social and spatial aspects of practice-research and notions of convivial aesthetics. In 2021, they were invited by Abingdon Studios to showcase their work in the window space and the upstairs project space. The idea of the exhibition was to demonstrate how working collectively has impacted their individual practices and their approaches to practice-as-research.
  • The Beginning of Process: 1 of 366 prints taken from the same plate and The End of Process: 366 of 366 prints taken from the same plate

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09)
    Prints numbers 1 and 366 from the series 366:366 (finally) were exhibited in the All the Small Things exhibition, Artcore, Derby, September 2021. For the leap year of 2016 I exhaled on an etching plate every day. 366 breaths layered on the same surface, in the same place, and at roughly the same time. The accumulative breaths charted the process of isolating and capturing those layered singular exhalations, and over the next 4 years the act was reversed through printmaking methods. ‘366:366 (finally)’ was a work in and indebted to process; a series of prints made from the etched plate to match the number of breaths which scored it’s image.
  • A Woman's World

    Bartram, Angela; Parker, Christine; University of Derby (2021-09)
    What happens in the daily life of a woman in a DAC nation? What challenges do they face; what delights do they encounter? This artistic research project captures the daily activities of young women living in Mexico or of Mexican decent. The video tells the story of a month that is normal, domestic, and part of the personal and everyday for these women.
  • Civic LAB Symposium 2021

    Jones, Rhiannon; Murden, Jade; McMahon, Daithi; Hawthorn, Matt; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07-08)
    The online Symposium: CivicLAB presents the work of researchers, artists and creative industry colleagues from across the UK, including international colleagues from Venice, Finland, USA. Speakers were from European Cultural Academy , Tate Exchange, Derby County Community Trust, Derby Theatre, Derby Cathedral, University of Manchester, East Street Arts, Space and Place Lead, Council for Higher Education Art and Design (CHEAD), Fashion Academics Creating Equality (FACE), University for the Creative Arts, Cumulus Association, University of Swansea, Mighty Creatives, University of Nottingham, University of Derby, Each speaker focuses on participatory culture, creative dialogue and experiential design for social impact. Questions asked include: How do we build communities (Manzini, 2019) and how can we create the conditions in which those communities can sustainably develop, innovate and thrive within the social, economic, environmental and cultural challenges of the 21st century? Researchers and practitioners in the LAB amalgamate a diverse span of creative practices and perspectives across the arts and social sciences to contribute to this burgeoning field of enquiry; interrogating, extending and redefining the value of creative practice to the public sphereThe Symposium events were organised and curated by Dr Rhiannon Jones supported by co-conveners Dr Daithi McMahon, Jade Murden and supported by Matt Hawthorn, The Symposium includes papers, presentations, panels, Keynote and workshops by the following international speakers: Dr Cara Courage, Dr Daithí McMahon, Dr Nick Owen (MBE), Dr Annie Tubadjiat, Dr Larissa Allwork Dr Rhiannon Jones, Dr Clive Holmwood, Dr Teresa Forde, Dr Maria Photiou, Dr Gemma Collard-Stokes, Panel Speakers: Liz Ange, Alexandra Laqueuer, Anna Lindberg, Benita Odogwu-Atkinson, Sandra Booth, Caroline Barth, The Very Rev'd Dr Peter Robinson, Dr Victoria Barker, Professor Cecile Wright, Simon Carnell.
  • CivicLAB Symposium proceedings

    Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; Murden, Jade; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07-08)
    Civic LAB is a collaborative research Civic Lab is an interdisciplinary research group centred on participatory culture, creative dialogue and experiential design for social impact. How do we build communities (Manzini, 2019) and how can we create the conditions in which those communities can sustainably develop, innovate and thrive within the social, economic, environmental and cultural challenges of the 21st century? Researchers and practitioners in the Lab amalgamate a diverse span of creative practices and perspectives across the arts and social sciences to contribute to this burgeoning field of enquiry; interrogating, extending and redefining the value of creative practice to the public sphere. As a research forum for partnership and transfer of knowledge and best practices, the lab offers thoughtful and provocative readings of this sphere, through practical and theoretical acts of research and dissemination. The LAB promotes and supports a wide range of multidisciplinary creative research activities working with external cultural partners, public, commercial and third sector organisations, educational institutions and international networks. Through public engagement, participation and collaboration we aim to develop, deploy, evaluate and publish projects, works and methodologies which engender sustainable social, environmental and cultural impact. This research group is aligned to The Digital and Material Artistic Research Centre (DMARC) at the University of Derby, which addresses the shifting boundaries within the terrain of creative and artistic research. The work of the lab articulates a public pedagogy which effaces the boundaries between research, teaching, and the University’s civic agenda to create a positive impact in a range of contexts including, but not limited to: • socially engaged artistic research practice • health and wellbeing • social justice, mobility and inequality • participatory placemaking/place-reshaping • play, pedagogy and educational development • cultural heritage and belonging This is the first Civic LAB Symposium Civic LAB is a research group that sits within DMARC – the Digital Material Artists Research Centre based in the College of Arts, Humanities and Education. As a LAB we very much support and encourage a cross university way of working both internally and externally with stakeholder and the public. We want to use this symposium as a platform for profiling the brilliant research that is being undertaken by colleagues here at Derby but also those from other H.E institutions, such as University of Nottingham, Swansea University, University of Helskini, University of Manchester, University for the Creative Arts. We also have colleagues joining us from Derby County Community Trust, Derby Cathedral and Derby Theatre. We are joined by The Council for Higher Education in Art & Design (CHEAD), East Street Arts, Cumulus the only Global association to serve art and design education and research, The Mighty Creatives and European Cultural Academy, Venice. This fantastic group of organisations and individuals will enrich our thinking and sharing of methods of best practice and research and regroup our thinking in what we mean by Civic Life, and its impact on and relationship to each of us as academics, as citizens and industry professionals.
  • Derby Voice – Creative Place-Making

    Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07)
    The artistic research project Derby Voice engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education. The methodology used S.H.E.D to create a co-designed site-specific installation at Derby Cathedral. It provided young people with opportunities to create work for a public context, to talk about their city and issues exacerbated by the COVID pandemic in the UK; such as BLM, education reform, employment, mental health and well-being. The research identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact on financial or family support. Derby Voice highlights the value of devising an artistic and dialogic methodology. It enhanced wellbeing, widened access and increased cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. It shifted thinking about formal education settings and redefined the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for change. The research highlights the benefits of temporal installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, public and policy-makers to engage directly with youth voice, through creative place-making by young people. It disseminated both the design and impact of the research, proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower young people. The research actively contributed to the cultural offer in Derby and impacts of socially-engaged art.
  • Protest S.H.E.D

    Jones, Rhiannon; National Justice Museum; University of Derby (National Justice Museum, 2021-08-01)
    This Artistic Residency in August 2021 summer, the National Justice Museum deigned by Dr Jones with collaboration from Barend Slabbert, and Interior Design Course Level 2 Students. Dr Jones curated a series of events, film screenings, talks and activities as part of S.H.E.D - the Social Higher Education Depot, with producer Ollie Smith. A S.H.E.D flatpack, pop up and mobile arts venue opened in our outdoor courtyard, creating a unique public space for activities stimulating discussion around young people and protest. The conversations also informed the development of an exhibition, due to open in January 2022. Dr Jones created a bespoke site specific installation for the Museum turning the courtyard that is Usually is a car park space, into a hub of creative, social and educational activity for a period of two weeks. We had participation from children as young as 5 right through to those in the late 70s. The research questions we addressed through this work explored how can museums, such as the national justice museum, look to create an alternative space for conversations with people about justice, the law and protest. We recognise that these conversations are urgent and necessary; for the future care of our planet and for society. To do this, Dr Jones created a site specific responsive space and programme with producer Ollie Smith, to interrogate the issues of social justice, young people’s opportunities and the impact on arts culture and heritage and to do that in radically different context for the museum and all activities we designed and delivered were free to attend. The outcome of the research highlights how it is often underestimated how important culture and social spaces are and the importance of co-operation, of cultural heritage and living heritage. We have witnessed first hand how inviting people to this space has empowered individuals, and brought people together, visiting the museum or passing by the museum. We had a blend of museum and non museum attendees – and shifted the parameters for engagement and of the physical blueprint of the architectural space. It was evidence that our approach increased individuals wellbeing which is an important pathway to learning, of providing the time and space to invite other to feeling that they have an important part to play in museum culture, that it somehow connects and belongs to them, that they have agency, and that their voice matters – sometimes even before the individual might know themselves just how important they are or how to use it. This is all underpinned by Manzini who talks about using expert design process to trigger and support meaningful social change. Which we can see taking place through this project and through the creation of a unique codesigned structure and artist led practice. The residency provided an opportunity to really challenge the potential of codesigned practices – and how we think about cocreation and placemaking. Over 17 days, and 2547 people of which, 1 in 4 were new audience goer to the museum and 2 out of of 4 were engaging with shed for the first time as extended activities and enriching way for them to experience the museum environment and wanted more and over 6,000 people actively engaged with our social media activity and with 13.5thousand impressions. The research methodology created a community of practice which is centred on a set of conditions that in turn defines that community as being a sustainable, innovative, creating a co-designed process from which new solutions for museum engagement of how to turn museums inside out can be done and where new audiences and knowledge is created. Shed became an incubation museum space, a hub of activity and action by shifting and relocating the context for learning and engagement. We extended the learning environment into the city, this action that has taken place has opened up dialogues, created new museum artefacts, and through this - documentation has started to build the foundations for an exhibition at the museum in 2022 as part of the legacy building work and inform the museums thinking about the potential of courtyard as a space transform and externalise the museum content bringing history outside of the building, engage with new audiences, ask questions such as whose history gets told and how does a museum connect with its contemporary audiences and public who live and work alongside the museum. The impact that asking these questions is having on future programming and public engagement is evident and by placing the museum in to the public domain through the use of a reconfigurable shed as a methodology has extend the possibilities of how different lived experiences can redefine how we think about the role , place, and opened up discourse about the future ways of working and learning for the museum .Together, we have generated a really exciting body of work, exploring protest and justice and climate change – the new knowledges and artworks gathered from the public, are informing the next design of shed and the activity that will take place in it, when we return in spring 2022 and informing part of our work into how we redesign and reconsider the outcomes and processes of social innovation and civic practice.
  • All the Small Things exhibition

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09-10)
    All the Small Things is an exhibition of artworks, designs, films and music at Artcore's Derby City Centre gallery. The exhibition presents the exciting and diverse work produced by staff in the School of Arts at the University of Derby, and includes artefacts, videos, painting, drawing and photography, amongst others. The exhibition covers the range of disciplines represented and taught within the University's School of Arts portfolio - fine art, photography, design, film, media, performing arts, and therapeutic arts. The rules: objects and wall-based works should be no bigger than 6 inches x 6 inches x 6 inches; films no longer than 5 minutes duration. Curated by Angela Bartram.
  • Who are we, Where do we come from, Where are we going to? Writing Greek Cypriot Women's Art Histories in Contemporary Cyprus

    Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Bloomsbury, 2021-03-25)
    This chapter engages with material so far insufficiently examined in art history: the work of Greek Cypriot women artists. The work of these women artists has received little attention and has frequently been marginalised from official art histories. This chapter develops a framework to explain some of the processes and conditions that affected Greek Cypriot women artists’ lives and careers. It is based on research I carried out for my doctoral thesis at Loughborough University entitled Rethinking the History of Cypriot Art: Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Cyprus. In this chapter I begin with reviewing perspectives on writing Greek Cypriot women artists’ histories. I will address the socio-political conditions from which Greek Cypriot artists emerged and their problematic position, which has been associated with patriarchy and nationalism. This matter is explored by a number of contemporary Greek Cypriot feminists: patriarchal society and national politics left no space for women in Cyprus to struggle for women’s rights, to contest patriarchy or to gain public visibility.2Significant to my discussion is how the socio-political conditions affected Greek Cypriot women artists’ lives and careers. Within this context I will use interview material to refine our understanding of how women artists responded to these socio-political conditions. The works of Loukia Nicolaidou At the Fields (c.1933) and Rhea Bailey Memories of the Yard (1979) will be analysed – their work underlines discourses related to gender relations and socio-political conditions in contemporary Cyprus.
  • Reflections in Anticipation of Loss

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09-08)
    There is a shadow that quietly, but progressively creeps upon us with advancing age, a sense of being unheard and increasingly cloaked with invisibility. Solitude and loneliness, which is so often a consequence for the elderly, has a deteriorating effect on health, which often goes unrepresented, unacknowledged, and not discussed. A domestic companion offers appeasement, and a dog gains significance where there is no other human present. The lightning talk focuses on the reflective and poignant stories of the anticipated loss of a pet dog told by participants in my artistic research project, Dogs and the Elderly. The project, made with participants from the Alzheimer’s Society’s ‘Memory Cafes’ in Nottingham and Lincolnshire, connects with those held in a companionable embrace with dogs. It offers personal and pertinent stories of the significance of end of live interspecies relationships to be told; it provides the opportunity for others to listen and hear those intimacies and understand the positive value such inter-species relationships bring. The conference presentation addresses and discuss the importance of domestic end of life human-dog relationships, and the anticipation and fear of loss to come. A video, containing the words spoken by participants, will play throughout to illustrate their sentiments.
  • Beyond theoretical: integrating a live project brief into an interior design module

    Jones, Rhiannon; Slabbert, Barend; McMahon, Daithi; Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07-20)
  • Creative and artistic place-making: creating a museology of Civic Dialogues during a pandemic

    Jones, Rhiannon; University of Rome; University of Derby (Cumulus, 2021-06-11)
    Dr Jones chair of the Contemporary Art Working Group will discuss examples of how artists, educators and researchers are creating Design Culture(s) within Contemporary Art practice and research. It will consider this in relation to the Cumulus Community, so extending the debate on current issues, practices and research shared live at the Cumulus 2021 conference. To facilitate this, there will be a project presentation on Creative and artistic place-making: creating a museology of Civic Dialogues during a pandemic. Dr Jones invited Andrea Hadley-Johnson, Artistic Programme Manager, National Justice Museum, UK to co-present and share examples of methodologies engaged and devised through a co-creative and place-making model for the generation of public practice. This will be followed by an open platform for discussion. We will share ideas or acts of resilience, adaption and invention within Contemporary Art locating examples within a globalised frame of reference. The working group invited participation from academics, located internationally, whose practice and/or research challenges notions of civic resilience, design cultures, current cultural, social, and economic challenges in art and design.
  • Derby Voice: Creative Place-Making

    Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; University of Western Australia (Common Ground Research Networks, 2021-06-16)
    The artistic research project Derby Voice engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education. The methodology used S.H.E.D to create a co-designed site-specific installation at Derby Cathedral. It provided young people with opportunities to create work for a public context, to talk about their city and issues exacerbated by the COVID pandemic in the UK; such as BLM, education reform, employment, mental health and well-being. The research identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact on financial or family support. Derby Voice highlights the value of devising an artistic and dialogic methodology. The research’s impact is noted within UK contemporary social contexts. It enhanced wellbeing, widened access and increased cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. It shifted thinking about formal education settings and redefined the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for change. The research highlights the benefits of temporal installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, public and policy-makers to engage directly with youth voice, through creative place-making by young people. It provided essential life skills resulting in social mobility and widening access to the arts. It disseminated both the design and impact of the research, proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower young people. The research actively contributed to the cultural offer in Derby and impacts of socially-engaged art.
  • OneConversation with S.H.E.D: Designing in Dialogue

    Jones, Rhiannon; Slabbert, Barend; University of Derby (2021-04-22)
    This research workshop will provide an opportunity to find out more about S.H.E.D. Together, we will discuss what a bespoke configuration would look like, where it would be placed and what you want to see happen in it, to best serve you and your community. We will do this through discussion and watch as your design comes to life on screen in 3D animation, placing co-creation at the heart of what we do, to support the shedding of preconceptions about people and place.
  • Pre-conference keynote discussion for CHEAD

    Jones, Rhiannon; University of Derby (CHEAD, 2021-03-16)
    Chaired by Dr Rhiannon Jones, a virtual S.H.E.D was created to host a live digital conference session for delegates to attend a post keynote discussion. Reflecting on Baroness Benjamin’s incredible journey, her inspirational positivity and her passion for education as an agency for social justice. In the S.H.E.D were panelists, David McGravie,Head of School of Arts Deputy Dean College of Arts, Humanities and Education University of Derby Benita Odogwu-Atkinson, University of the Arts London,FACE: Fashion Academics Creating Equality Member and Kerry Gough Principal Lecturer at Nottingham Trent University, Learning and Teaching Manager. The S.H.E.D, is a flatpack, pop up and mobile arts venue & public space, designed for the facilitation of conversation. It has been designed for the shedding of preconceptions of people and place. This humble ‘garden shed’ can be transformed into a variety of bespoke environments, has 15 rubric configurations to instigate bespoke co-creative environments with others in order to deliver strategically designed activities. It has been designed in line with cultural and socio-civic research, its flexibility enables it to deliver strategically designed activities, while also providing an accessible and inclusive space that supports the needs and priorities of communities. For the post keynote discussion, a digital version was created, S.H.E.D was a vehicle for discovery and development. But we hope to retain its ethos, which, at the heart of the project is the desire to create positive civic impact, working towards greater social mobility by providing opportunities to access inspirational and educational content outside of formal organisational structures. And focuses on access and education for all through creative and cultural engagement. The Keynote speaker, Baroness Benjamin’s, provided an inspiring address on Childhood Lasts a Lifetime – which was used as both inspiration and provocation for the panel discussion. Reflections were given on Baroness Benjamin’s incredible journey, her inspirational positivity and her passion for education as an agency for social justice. This panel will focus on the fact that it will be a year since UK higher education was faced with an abrupt shift to response mode in the face of the COVID-19 crisis. The sector responded with agility, creativity and flexibility, with much to celebrate in how our community innovated so rapidly with many adaptions showing the way towards significant transformations for the longer-term. At the same time as the COVID 19 crisis, the Black Lives Matter movement resurged and mobilised action for change. The realisation that the ‘New Normal’ is one of inevitable constant change must also come with an understanding of uncertainty. We cannot go back to where we were, and we need to reframe what our future will be. The conference created a space to learn and reflect, and turned our thoughts to the renewal and reimagining of our role in a shifting, more sustainable, fairer and diverse future. The session was designed by Dr Rhiannon Jones, to facilitate and provoke discourse on some of the key themes and matters that are at the fore in art and design education and practice. To achieve this, a series of provocations were given, RJ provocation for the floor…..” What is the importance and contribution of arts and design? Is that students learn to think and act as artists, makers and designers, working creatively and intelligently. They develop an appreciation of and engagement in art, craft and design as critical consumers and audiences and an understanding of its role in the creative and cultural industries that shape and enrich their lives. RJ provocation for the floor…..” To be resilient, to have determination, to encourage creativity in everyone and access for everyone to education. To empower children/young people to ‘fix the world’ Would you agree…. RJ provocation for the floor…..”Key to overcoming some of the biggest issues facing modern Britain, the education sector must continue to reform. From determining the right balance between school autonomy and central oversight, to finding ways that education can provide a pathway for all children to achieve their potential, informed research and discussions are needed to make headway. Adult education and continuous skills development is also increasingly crucial as the labour market is transforming, meaning that education reform will be necessary across all age groups”. Do you agree with this? RJ provocation for the floor…..”Governments Social Mobility Report (published Feb 2021) “This is the Commission’s tenth year of influencing policy at the highest level and pushing for sustainable change in areas including early years childcare, housing, education and apprenticeships. We have made great strides but there is still a long way to go.” Sasha Morgan, Director of the Social Mobility Commission
  • S.H.E.D. – Design for Emergency

    Jones, Rhiannon; Barker, Victoria; Colombo, Sara; Ciuccarelli, Paolo; CHEAD (CHEAD, 2021-03-17)
    This presentation introduces the Design for Emergency research project, an open design platform launched in 2020 at the Center for Design (Northeastern University, Boston) to collaborate on design solutions and confront the COVID-19 emergency. Design for Emergency is led by Dr Sara Colombo and Prof Paolo Ciuccarelli and gathers a global team of researchers across 11 countries. They will discuss the first design activity built on results of an international survey and a design challenge in Brazil. As well as offering insights into how this research project reconfigures design needs and purpose, their introduction provides a refreshing take on a global understanding of the role that design challenges perform in order to build solutions that address the problems and challenges of the pandemic. Dr Rhiannon Jones and Dr Victoria Barker are the lead UK Research partners. Dr Rhiannon Jones and Dr Victoria Barker will share plans for the UK research for this project, building further survey insights and creating a S.H.E.D open design challenge for UK-based designers and artists to test out some of the internationally proposed designs generated as a result of this research initiative.
  • Be Your Dog (re-worked) at Mink Festival: A Zoo of the Pandemic

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Mink Festival, 2021-01)
    Be Your Dog analyses the relationship that positions animal bodies as hierarchically other, by offering understanding of differing perspectives within domestic cohabiting pairs of inter-species companions. Developed with seven sets of established companions in workshops over two weekends at KARST, this inter-species ‘pack’ became co-performers in a concluding public event. All participants were positioned and were visible as artists and equals. This is a re-worked video taken from the footage of the public event.
  • ANTONYM: Life With and Without Animals: an online exhibition

    Bartram, Angela; Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2020-11)
    The online exhibition ANTONYM: Life With and Without Animals presents the work of eight artists from the UK, USA and Iceland at Artcore, Derby. Each makes artwork that engages with the more-than-human world, reflecting on contemporary threats to nonhuman life as well as on the pleasures of our relationships with other species. The exhibition coincides with the online conference Life With and Without Animals at the University of Derby, and is its companion exhibition. Like its companion, this exhibition was scheduled for physical delivery at Artcore, but due to the Covid-19 pandemic a decision was made to make this online. Both events were organised and curated by Steve Baker and Angela Bartram. The exhibition includes work by the following international artists: Andrea Roe and Cath Keay; Angela Bartram; Paula McCloskey and Sam Vardy; Johanna Hällsten; Julia Schlosser; Lee Deigaard; Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir and Mark Wilson; and Steve Baker.
  • Life with and without animals: the second (Un)common worlds conference

    Bartram, Angela; Baker, Steve; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-11)
    Keynote speakers: Dr. Susan McHugh, Professor of English, University of New England and Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson - Dr Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir, Professor of Fine Art, Iceland University of the Arts, Reykjavík, and, Dr Mark Wilson, Professor of Fine Art, Institute of the the Arts, University of Cumbria, UK. Following the first (Un)common Worlds conference in Turku, Finland in 2018, called Contesting the Limits of Human – Animal Communities, the animal research group within the Digital and Material Artistic Research Centre at the University of Derby presented the second, Life With and Without Animals, a one-day online animal studies conference in November 2020. When the term ‘animal studies’ was coined in the early 1990s it was initially envisaged rather narrowly as a subfield of the social sciences, but by the time of two large and ground-breaking international conferences in 2000 – Representing Animals in Milwaukee and Millennial Animals in Sheffield – it was clear that the arts and humanities were at least as important to this nascent field as the social sciences. Some of the concerns of those early conferences remain as important as ever: the avoidance of anthropocentrism, an attention to the lives and experience of nonhuman animals that does not reduce them to symbolic representations of human values, and a recognition of the contested but necessary role of animal advocacy within the field of animal studies. Other priorities have shifted, perhaps most importantly in recognition of the impact of climate change, environmental degradation and species extinctions, and the changes these have brought about to our understanding of, and engagement with the more-than-human world. This conference conveyed a sense of what the interdisciplinary field of animal studies looked like in 2020, and included contributions in support of this proposal. Originally planned as a three-day physical conference for July 2020, this was rescheduled and re-orientated for online delivery over a day in November 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. A recording of the day is attached to this record. Conference leads: Professor Steve Baker and Professor Angela Bartram.
  • A profound difference: InDialogue Symposium

    Harris, Philip; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-11-19)
    Young Europeans studying at the University of Derby were invited to be filmed and speaking of their attitudes towards the outcome of the EU referendum. They were given the choice to speak in their own language or in English. A stipulation was the time duration of sixteen seconds, imposed due to the limitations of the mechanism of the camera for the production of slow-motion footage. Each loop recycles over a period of approximately one minute. The employment of slow-motion transforms the rendering of the act of speaking into a dramatic performance, heightening the awareness of the viewer to the movements of the face, the intonation of words (e.g. as the lips purse to form the Br of Brexit) and the perceived quality of expression as the act of speaking slowly unfolds throughout the duration of the film as sixteen seconds is expanded into sixty. The division of the face into light and dark, the silence of the footage against the mechanical noise of the projector, the cyclical repetition of the footage, allude to the social polarisation caused by this political process and the sense alienation felt by many young Europeans who live, study and work here. The film is presented as an Installation of 16mm cine projectors with films on continuous loops.

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