• Nothing but the Truth, take two: fighting for the reader in the Tlatelolco 1968 discourse

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2012-04)
      The hypothesis put forward in this project is that there are two mechanisms of creating a collective memory of the event: one is hegemonic (dominated by state discourses and, potentially, academic studies of the shooting), and the other is posthegemonic (dominated by literary and popular discourses). We also posit that neither mechanism produces or even aims to produce an accurate representation of the event; instead, the two systems control cognitive and affective domains in collective conscience. The present paper will compare the way the two mechanisms are used in the contemporary analyses of the Tlatelolco massacre. The two works in question are Roberto Blanco Moheno, Tlatelolco: historia de una infamia (1969), and Guillermo Balám, Tlatelolco: Reflexiones de un testigo (1969). I aim to determine whether the two authors, apparently representing the opposing camps in the Tlatelolco discourse, approach the representation of the massacre from two divergent perspectives or whether their texts are characterised by the unity of the mechanisms involved in creating a memory of the event in the collective conscience.
    • The Orrery/The Orrery: between image and object

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2012)
    • Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2020-12-18)
      Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of the Irish diaspora who emigrated to Derby in the 1950s and 60s primarily. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project acts as a recognition of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It also offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and Britain.
    • Pax: variations

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2000)
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    • Photocinema:the creative edges of photography and film

      Campbell, Neil; Cramerotti, Alfredo; University of Derby (Intellect Books, 2013)
      Taking as its starting point the notion of photocinema—or the interplay of the still and moving image—the photographs, interviews, and critical essays in this volume explore the ways in which the two media converge and diverge, expanding the boundaries of each in interesting and unexpected ways. The book’s innovative approach to film and photography produces a hybrid “third space,” where the whole becomes much more than the sum of its individual parts, encouraging viewers to expand their perceptions to begin to understand the bigger picture. Photocinema represents a nuanced theoretical and practical exploration of the experimental cinematic techniques exemplified by artists like Wim Wenders and Hollis Frampton. In addition to new critical essays by Victor Burgin and David Campany, the book includes interviews with Martin Parr, Hannah Starkey, and Aaron Schuman and a portfolio of photographs from various new and established artists.
    • The Playwrights’ Register

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Yr Academi Gymreig, 1984)
    • Poland translated: post-Communist writing in Poland: a survey

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Springer Verlag, 2010)
    • The Politics of literature: Poland 1945-89

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (University of Wales Press, 1989)
      This study explores the relationship between literature and politics. It asks what literature can tell us about politics, and it does so by exploring Polish literary-political culture in the years 1945-89. During these years the Communist Party, for all its opposite intent, preserved the power of the word and the moral and political position of writers at a time when in western Europe and America writers were no longer taken very seriously as political commentators. This was a period when writers in Poland occupied a position of great moral authority. Many believed that, in spite of Soviet power, an independent Polish socialism was a possibility, and that even if they were not able to shake off the power of Moscow they might still be able to turn communism into a force for good.
    • Politics, modernism, and Bob Dylan's search for a Usable Past in the Rolling Thunder Revue

      David Holloway; University of Derby (Symbiosis, 2016-04)
      This essay considers how Bob Dylan's use of modernist style, from Cubism to Brecht's "Epic Theatre", informs his 1975 tour, The Rolling Thunder Revue.
    • Postwestern Literature and Criticism.

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press., 2016-03)
      This chapter surveys the concept of postwestern literature and examines it through a close reading of examples such as Cormac McCarthy, Willy Vlautin, Karen Tei Yamashita and John Williams.
    • The production and reproduction of inequality in the UK in times of austerity

      Nunn, Alex; University of Derby (SpringerPalgrave Macmillan, 2016-11-29)
      Inequality appears to be back on the intellectual and political agenda. This paper provides a commentary on this renewed interest, drawing on an empirical discussion of inequality in the UK. The paper argues that inequality should be seen as produced in the inherently unequal social relations of production, drawing attention to the role of social struggle in shaping dynamics of inequality. However, inequality is not just produced in dynamic class struggle in the formal economy, but also through the social reproduction of labour power on a day-to-day and inter-generational basis. As such, inequalities of household resources at any point in time may be reproductive of greater future inequality. It is argued that inequality has risen in the UK over recent decades because of changes in the social relations of production in the formal economy and social reproduction in the domestic sector, both of which have witnessed significant state interventions that have increased structural inequalities. It is argued that, absent of significant change, the underpinning structural dynamics in the UK will lead to further increases in inequality over the short and longer-term. Given this, we might expect to see an already emergent ‘New Politics of Inequality’ intensifying in the coming decades.
    • The question of space interrogating the spatial turn between disciplines

      Crouch, David; Nieuwenhuis, Marijn; Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017-10)
      The spatial turn has been deeply influential across the humanities and social sciences for several decades. Yet despite this long term influence most volumes focus mainly on geography and tend to take a Eurocentric approach to the topic. The Question of Space takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding how the spatial turn has affected a wide range of disciplines. By connecting developments across radically different fields the volume bridges the very borders that separate the academic space. From new geographies through performance, using the internet, politics and the arts, the distinctive chapters undertake conversations that often surprisingly converge in approach, questions and insights. Together the chapters transcend longstanding disciplinary boundaries to build a constructive dialogue around the question of space.
    • The rhizomatic West: representing the American West in a transnational, global Media Age

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska PressOutsider, 2008)
    • Rory Williams: The boy who waited.

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland Press, 2016)
      This chapter considers the character of Rory Williams as a companion of the Doctor within the television series Doctor Who. The chapter considers issues of gender and masculinity within science fiction.
    • S/Z/COOPER/COOPER: Barthes with Twin Peaks: The Return

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Cardiff University, 2020-11-12)
    • "The Seam of Something Else Unnamed": Sebastian Barry's Days Without End

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-07-21)
      This essay examines Sebastian Barry's Days Without End as a novel that examines and critiques conventions of the American West through its consideration of alternative communities of sexuality. Using theoretical frames drawn from performativity studies, it explores how terrible prejudices of race, gender and sexuality can be challenged.
    • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
      This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
    • Shaping public opinion in a time of colonial conflict: media allegations of the use of torture by the French army in the first Vietnam war

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (2019-10)
      This article is set against the broader background of editorial comment and eye-witness reportage in the French printed media on France's war of decolonisation in Indochina and Algeria between 1946 and 1962. It focuses on one particular aspect of this period, namely the allegations of misconduct by the French army during this conflict, which is also known as the First Vietnam War (1946 - 1954) as part of the Vietnamese liberation struggle against French colonial mastery. At the heart of this analysis lies the way in which the conflict was represented in three key journals in France at the time. The journals, 'Les Temps modernes', 'Temoignage Chretien' and 'Esprit', all still publishing, were vociferous in their criticism of the general conduct of the war, whilst 'Les Temps modernes' and 'Temoignage Chretien' laid particular emphasis on the use of repressive measures by members of the French Expeditionary Forces against the indigenous population of Vietnam, before 1950.
    • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
      This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.
    • Solaris - Lem/Tarkovsky/Soderbergh: adaptations in space

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Gylphi, 2013)