• Holy cards & bubble gum.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (2013-04)
      The hagiography represents the edited versions of a life, and presents us only with those things we are supposed to know. Those details glimpsed behind the official version of a life are often the most interesting. Just as Vasari listened to gossip to produce his Lives of the Artists, we have this urge to listen in, to discover the alternative lives behind the official versions. The Lives of the Saints offer endless possibilities to re-imagine and to reposition current needs behind those paragons of virtue. In this workshop I will flip over the Holy Cards to reveal a different set of circumstances beneath the saint’s day. Every day has its saint, every place has its patron, and every occupation has its guardian.. Some of the stories will be genuine, others invented, but it is not always easy to tell which are the real and which are the impossible saints.
    • How can a war be holy? Weimar attitudes towards Eastern spirituality

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
    • “I smoked them out”: Perspectives on the emergence of folk opera or ‘musical plays’ in Uganda.

      Kasule, Sam; University of Derby (Boydell and Brewer, 2020-11-20)
      Music is often cited as a central artistic mode in African theatre and performance practices. However, little attention has been paid to music theatre on the continent in general, and to opera in particular, with the exceptions of a few noted genres, such as Concert Party or the Yoruba "folk opera" of the 1960s, and the emerging research on opera culture in South Africa. This volume of African Theatre highlights the diversity across the continent from a variety of perspectives - including those of genre, media, and historiography. Above all, it raises questions and encourages debate: What does "opera" mean in African and African diasporic contexts? What are its practices and legacies - colonial, postcolonial and decolonial; what is its relation to the intersectionalities of race and class? How do opera and music theatre reflect, change or obscure social, political and economic realities? How are they connected to educational and cultural institutions, and non-profit organisations? And why is opera contradictorily, at various times, perceived as both "grand" and "elitist, "folk" and "quotidian", "Eurocentric" and "indigenous"? Contributors also address aesthetic transformation processes, the porousness of genre boundaries and the role of space and place, with examples ranging from Egypt to South Africa, from Uganda to West Africa and the USA. The playscript in this volume is We Take Care of Our Own by Zainabu Jallo GUEST EDITORS: Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo & Hilde Roos Series Editors: Yvette Hutchison, Reader, Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, University of Warwick; Chukwuma Okoye, Reader in African Theatre & Performance University of Ibadan; Jane Plastow, Professor of African Theatre, University of Leeds.
    • The IMF and a new global politics of inequality?

      Nunn, Alex; White, Paul; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University (Australian Political Economy Movement, 2017-01)
      This paper addresses a simple, and largely empirical, research question: is the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) recent high level commitment to reducing inequality translated into concrete action in its dealings with member states? Addressing this research question is significant in several respects. First, the high level rhetorical commitment to reduce inequality might be seen as paradoxical because the IMF, alongside other institutions of global economic management, has long been criticised for its role in promoting economic reform in member countries, partly on the basis that this increases inequality (Peet et al. 2009; Kentikelenis et al. 2016: 550-1). It is therefore important to assess the extent to which recent pronouncements on inequality by the Fund suggest a change in emphasis or a genuine institutional commitment. Second, addressing the question contributes to a contemporary academic literature on more technical aspects of how we should understand and interpret IMF policy advice and conditionality. This literature currently focusses on a range of aspects of IMF policy advice, but does not address the recent interest of the Fund in inequality. The paper addresses this lacuna.
    • Informant disavowal and the interpretation of storytelling revival

      Heywood, Simon; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2004)
      The scholarship of traditional arts revivals is often ironic. Revivalists’ activity has been understood as a rational, politically nostalgic, and symbolic re-enactment of a fictional past. In this, scholars have underestimated the significance of disavowal; that is, informants’ neutral or negative responses to analytical methods and conclusions. Interviews with English storytelling revivalists reveal a coherent and significant consensus of disavowal, showing their primary concern to be not with nostalgic self-rationalisation, but with basic practical issues of artistic and sociable interaction. Storytelling revival involves nostalgic displays that are actually fragmentary, superficial, and subordinate to practical concerns. This suggests that revivalists are seeking not to symbolise an imagined past for political purposes, but to familiarise recently appropriated performance genres for artistic purposes. This conclusion is hypothetically applicable to the uses of nostalgic rationalisation within other revival movements.
    • Jan Kochanowski: Polish poet

      Tighe, Carl (2012-09)
    • KssssS

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2004)
      a novel
    • Landscape, land and identity: a performative consideration

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2012)
      This chapter considers ideas of land and identity processes through an original consideration of landscape. Following Taussig's argument that cultural meaning and identification are less constituted in institutionalised and ritualised signification than emergent in the performance of life, attention focuses upon the performative character of landscape and its relationality with land and identity.... Making land significant in life is considered through landscape in the notion of spacing. The notion of an everyday, gentle politics is introduced to the constitution of identities and feeling of land. Identities and values concerning land are produced relationally in the energy cracks between performativity and institutions, as the several investigations upon which this chapter draws testify.
    • Lived places of anarchy: Colin Ward’s social anarchy in action

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)
    • Making meaning and meaning making: memory, postmemory and narrative in Holocaust literature

      Flower, Annie; University of Derby (2013)
      This paper explores links between narration and memory in Holocaust literature and examines ways in which individuals construct memory and postmemory. Based on the premise that ‘All authors mediate reality through their writing...’ and taking into consideration that what we remember and how we remember is likely to have a significant impact on the narratives that we construct, this article considers the reliability of memory. It argues that whilst there is, at times, a blurring of boundaries between fact and fiction in Holocaust literature, this has little or no impact on the validity and authenticity of the narratives. In an attempt to address these issues more fully, this paper explores the notions of making meaning and meaning making, whilst considering the effects of positionality, time and trauma on memory. Key texts referred to in this discussion include Night (1958) by Elie Wiesel, All Rivers Run to the Sea (1996) by Elie Wiesel, In My Brother’s Shadow (2005) by Uwe Timm and The Dark Room (2001) by Rachel Seiffert. These texts have been chosen in order to highlight the subjectivity of memory and postmemory and to demonstrate the role that narrative plays in their construction and representation.
    • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

      Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
      This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
    • Marion Adnams: A singular woman

      Forde, Teresa; Wood, Val; Bamford, Lucy; University of Derby; Derby Museums and Art Gallery (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 02/12/2017)
      Retrospective of Marion Adnams' work: Marion Elizabeth Adnams was born in Derby in 1898 where she remained, for the most part, until her death, aged ninety-six. During the course of her long life, she forged a reputation as a painter of deeply distinctive and dream-like visions inspired by the Surrealist movement. Adnams exhibited almost continuously in London and regional art galleries from the late 1930s and examples of her work can be found in many public collections, alongside that of her friends and contemporaries Evelyn Gibbs and Eileen Agar. Despite this, her work is largely forgotten today. This important exhibition brings together the full and diverse range of her art for the first time in almost fifty years in a bid to recapture the legacy of this most remarkable artist. This exhibition was made possible with support from Art Fund. This exhibition was curated in partnership with Val Wood, independent researcher, and Teresa Forde, Senior Lecturer in Film and Media at the University of Derby.
    • The media, ethnicity and religion as determinants of failed republics in Nigeria

      Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby; Benson Idahosa University (Delmas Communications Ltd, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria, 2010-10)
      This paper analyses the covert influence of ethnicity and religion on the media and voting in Nigerian elections and demonstrates how previous Nigerian republics have been hindered because of the impact of ethnic disservice and election crises, thereby providing opportunities for the military to topple each of those failed civilian administrations. Unfortunately, the press could not play a meaningful role in the 1964/65 election crises because the leaders of the factional groups in those conflicts were equally the owners of the early newspapers. So, they simply converted their papers into channels for fighting wars of personal vendetta. In fact, ethnic rivalry and religious intolerance are today the two major sources of conflict in Nigerian politics. For these reasons the paper advises the media to avoid playing the role of an advocate in the support of individuals and governmental agencies as well as ethnic nationality whose aims and objectives are inimical to the national interest and religious tolerance among the Nigerian public.
    • A New Gentleness: Affective Ficto-Regionality

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-11-01)
      Using affective critical regionality to enable a re-valuing of the local as a powerful means to appreciate the everyday and the overlooked as vital elements within a more inclusive understanding of how we live.
    • New Media and the Arab Spring of 2011

      Hudson, Robert Charles; Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby (Delmas Communications Ltd, 2012-09-07)
    • Not sucking in the seventies: The Rolling Stones and the myth of decline

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-10-29)
      This article reappraises the Stones’ “lost years.” However, in covering their reputation-imperiling half-decade between 1973 and 1978, it reaches back to the band’s fabled 1960s heyday and forward to its “revival” in order to identify continuities in practice and performance to counter the critical orthodoxy. Through the ’70s, the Rolling Stones released eight studio albums and one live set and toured almost annually; and, while their growing number of critics were keen to charge them with treason, their growing number of fans were evidently untroubled by the band’s often-cited crimes against the “ideology of rock.” I am not simply proposing, though, that healthy sales should be mobilized to bust the myth of decline. For, if not always “ahead of the game,” the Stones had a creatively meaningful relationship with some of the decade’s key musical developments—glam, disco, punk, and reggae. So, far from standing still artistically, gazing glassily at their elegantly wasted navels, stupefied by narcotics and cocooned by their bank balances, the Rolling Stones did some of their best work in this period—from the glam-ballad “Angie” through the funky dread of “Finger Print File” to the lo-fi energy of “Respectable.”