• Lived places of anarchy: Colin Ward’s social anarchy in action

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)
    • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

      Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
      The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.
    • Space, living, atmospheres, affectivities

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017-10)
    • The question of space interrogating the spatial turn between disciplines

      Crouch, David; Nieuwenhuis, Marijn; Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017-10)
      The spatial turn has been deeply influential across the humanities and social sciences for several decades. Yet despite this long term influence most volumes focus mainly on geography and tend to take a Eurocentric approach to the topic. The Question of Space takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding how the spatial turn has affected a wide range of disciplines. By connecting developments across radically different fields the volume bridges the very borders that separate the academic space. From new geographies through performance, using the internet, politics and the arts, the distinctive chapters undertake conversations that often surprisingly converge in approach, questions and insights. Together the chapters transcend longstanding disciplinary boundaries to build a constructive dialogue around the question of space.
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2017-07-19)
      Key debates in the domain of ‘Theory on Theory’ have this year focused upon the legacies of the theorists grouped together under the name ‘poststructuralism’, often drawing on material made available in recent decades by Barthes, Foucault and Deleuze which adds new facets to critical understanding of their work. Reflecting on their contributions, it appears that individual theorists can illuminate or extend each other’s oeuvres: Foucault in particular has attracted considerable attention in this vein in 2016, with books appearing which respectively place his ideas alongside those of Marx, Derrida and Deleuze. His lectures on ‘governmentality’, meanwhile, have prompted some to claim that his account of neoliberalism therein demonstrated a ‘quiet appreciation’ of it (Peter Fleming, The Mythology of Work: How Capitalism Persists Despite Itself (Pluto Press [2015]), p. 45). Turning to Barthes, we find re-evaluations...
    • The IMF and a new global politics of inequality?

      Nunn, Alex; White, Paul; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University (Australian Political Economy Movement, 2017-01)
      This paper addresses a simple, and largely empirical, research question: is the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) recent high level commitment to reducing inequality translated into concrete action in its dealings with member states? Addressing this research question is significant in several respects. First, the high level rhetorical commitment to reduce inequality might be seen as paradoxical because the IMF, alongside other institutions of global economic management, has long been criticised for its role in promoting economic reform in member countries, partly on the basis that this increases inequality (Peet et al. 2009; Kentikelenis et al. 2016: 550-1). It is therefore important to assess the extent to which recent pronouncements on inequality by the Fund suggest a change in emphasis or a genuine institutional commitment. Second, addressing the question contributes to a contemporary academic literature on more technical aspects of how we should understand and interpret IMF policy advice and conditionality. This literature currently focusses on a range of aspects of IMF policy advice, but does not address the recent interest of the Fund in inequality. The paper addresses this lacuna.
    • 'Walking into the world of the western': David Michod's The Rover as Australian Post-Western.

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Wroclaw University, Poland, 2017)
      Examines David Michod's Australian film The Rover as a post-western, showing how it both uses and re-interprets the tropes of the western for a new age. In particular, it explores the global themes of the film and its transnational concerns with ecology, power and identity.
    • The production and reproduction of inequality in the UK in times of austerity

      Nunn, Alex; University of Derby (SpringerPalgrave Macmillan, 2016-11-29)
      Inequality appears to be back on the intellectual and political agenda. This paper provides a commentary on this renewed interest, drawing on an empirical discussion of inequality in the UK. The paper argues that inequality should be seen as produced in the inherently unequal social relations of production, drawing attention to the role of social struggle in shaping dynamics of inequality. However, inequality is not just produced in dynamic class struggle in the formal economy, but also through the social reproduction of labour power on a day-to-day and inter-generational basis. As such, inequalities of household resources at any point in time may be reproductive of greater future inequality. It is argued that inequality has risen in the UK over recent decades because of changes in the social relations of production in the formal economy and social reproduction in the domestic sector, both of which have witnessed significant state interventions that have increased structural inequalities. It is argued that, absent of significant change, the underpinning structural dynamics in the UK will lead to further increases in inequality over the short and longer-term. Given this, we might expect to see an already emergent ‘New Politics of Inequality’ intensifying in the coming decades.
    • Disciplinary social policy and the failing promise of the new middle classes: the troubled families programme

      Tepe-Belfrage, Daniela; Nunn, Alex; University of Derby; University of Liverpool (Cambridge University Press, 2016-10-17)
      This article looks at the promise of the ‘New Middle Class’ (NMC) inherent in the neoliberal ideological ideal of individualising societal responsibility for well-being and success. The article points to how this promise enables a discourse and practice of welfare reform and a disciplining of life styles particularly targeting the very poor in society. Women and some ethnic minorities are particularly prone to poverty and then therefore also discipline. The article then provides a case study of the Troubled Families Programme (TFP) and shows how the programme and the way it is constructed and managed partly undermines the provision of the material needs to alleviate people from poverty and re-produces discourses of poor lifestyle and parenting choices as sources of poverty, thereby undermining the ‘middle-class’ promise.
    • Politics, modernism, and Bob Dylan's search for a Usable Past in the Rolling Thunder Revue

      David Holloway; University of Derby (Symbiosis, 2016-04)
      This essay considers how Bob Dylan's use of modernist style, from Cubism to Brecht's "Epic Theatre", informs his 1975 tour, The Rolling Thunder Revue.
    • Affective landscapes in literature, art, and everyday life: memory, place and the senses.

      Christine Berberich,; Neil Campbel; Robert Hudson; University of Derby (Ashgate., 2016-03-09)
      Bringing together a diverse group of scholars representing the fields of cultural and literary studies, cultural politics and history, creative writing and photography, this collection examines the different ways in which human beings respond to, debate and interact with landscape. How do we feel, sense, know, cherish, memorise, imagine, dream, desire or even fear landscape? What are the specific qualities of experience that we can locate in the spaces in and through which we live? While the essays most often begin with the broadly literary - the memoir, the travelogue, the novel, poetry - the contributors approach the topic in diverse and innovative ways. The collection is divided into five sections: ’Peripheral Cultures’, dealing with dislocation and imagined landscapes'; ’Memory and Mobility’, concerning the road as the scene of trauma and movement; ’Suburbs and Estates’, contrasting American and English spaces; ’Literature and Place’, foregrounding the fluidity of the fictional and the real and the human and nonhuman; and finally, ’Sensescapes’, tracing the sensory response to landscape. Taken together, the essays interrogate important issues about how we live now and might live in the future.
    • Postwestern Literature and Criticism.

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press., 2016-03)
      This chapter surveys the concept of postwestern literature and examines it through a close reading of examples such as Cormac McCarthy, Willy Vlautin, Karen Tei Yamashita and John Williams.
    • Rory Williams: The boy who waited.

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland Press, 2016)
      This chapter considers the character of Rory Williams as a companion of the Doctor within the television series Doctor Who. The chapter considers issues of gender and masculinity within science fiction.
    • Eleventh annual international academic conference on European integration borders: Imagined or real

      Hudson, Robert; University of Derby (2016)
      This volume is made up of selection of peer-reviewed chapters originally presented at the 11th international conference entitled: “Borders: Imagined or Real” which was held in Skopje on 21 May 2016. The main goal of the conference had been to provide an in-depth examination of the concepts of borders which over the years have been shown to have a strong presence and impact upon European societies, particularly with regard to their development and growth. Certainly, from a European Union perspective it cannot be denied that cross-border cooperation is one of the key phenomena that both characterizes and influences the current process of European integration. As such the conference sought to raise an awareness of the importance of the study of borders, and whether or not they are driven by territoriality or by government policy, through an investigation of their dynamic structures and elements. The conference also sought to explore new and alternative scenarios in the shaping and visualization of borders set against the concept of European integration from a critical and forward-looking perspective.
    • Not sucking in the seventies: The Rolling Stones and the myth of decline

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-10-29)
      This article reappraises the Stones’ “lost years.” However, in covering their reputation-imperiling half-decade between 1973 and 1978, it reaches back to the band’s fabled 1960s heyday and forward to its “revival” in order to identify continuities in practice and performance to counter the critical orthodoxy. Through the ’70s, the Rolling Stones released eight studio albums and one live set and toured almost annually; and, while their growing number of critics were keen to charge them with treason, their growing number of fans were evidently untroubled by the band’s often-cited crimes against the “ideology of rock.” I am not simply proposing, though, that healthy sales should be mobilized to bust the myth of decline. For, if not always “ahead of the game,” the Stones had a creatively meaningful relationship with some of the decade’s key musical developments—glam, disco, punk, and reggae. So, far from standing still artistically, gazing glassily at their elegantly wasted navels, stupefied by narcotics and cocooned by their bank balances, the Rolling Stones did some of their best work in this period—from the glam-ballad “Angie” through the funky dread of “Finger Print File” to the lo-fi energy of “Respectable.”
    • Citizenship, Reservations and the Regional Alternative in the All-India Services, ca. 1928–1950

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-04-08)
      This paper unearths an alternative paradigm through which to consider the discussions and debates between members of the Indian public, government bureaucrats and Congress Party politicians about the rights and interests of Indian citizens both before and immediately after India's Independence in 1947. It argues that much of the recent historical work on citizenship during this period has been preoccupied with issues of nationality and religious community as a result of the fallout from Partition. However, the demands and deliberations over the introduction of provincial forms of affirmative action in the all-India services at this time are indicative of a different narrative. First, many provincial representations of ‘minority’ rights often took into account differences of caste and language instead. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the term minority was employed not only to describe demographic minority status, but also to define under-represented groups in the all-India services. In doing so, these different provincial policies prioritised particular local rights to representation, in which citizenship was expressed through a regional idiom.
    • A utilitarian antagonist: the zombie in popular video games

      Hunt, Nathan; The University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This article takes as its starting point the prevalence of the zombie in video games. I argue that, although the zombie games often superficially resemble filmic texts in their use of aesthetic and narrative, they must be understood, less as a set of conventions and thematic metaphors in the way that the zombie text has been read in film and television scholarship, and more as a utilisation of the zombie as a utilitarian antagonist that facilitates and permits the pleasures of violence and fantasy in video game play. Beginning with the Resident Evil and Left 4 Dead series of games I examine the way that games necessarily update the notion zombie as mass antagonist via the need to vary gameplay activity through different styles of adversary for players. At the same time I will demonstrate that, far from simply being the province of the survival horror genre, the zombie appears across an array of game forms, game cultures and game productions. The zombie highlights the participatory nature of game culture in the array of zombie 'mods' that users create to transform existing games into zombie based games, in particular in relation to titles such as the Call of Duty series. At the other end of the production spectrum the zombie features heavily in the little studied area of online flash games where the zombie can be found in a variety of game genres and forms. The zombie here often operates as a pastiche of popular zombie narratives in survival games (The Last Stand), parodic engagements with zombie conventions (Jetpacks and Zombies) or play with the notion of zombie pandemics (the Infectionator games). Here I situate the zombie game as a aesthetic genre that works to provide an easily understandable context for such interactive genres as survival horror, text adventures, shooting games, physics games and driving games, with the popularity of these enough to drive numerous dedicated hosting and link sites such as zombiegames.net. The pastiche element of these games extends into gamers social engagement with games. Online debates over the the appropriate actions or preparation for a zombie holocaust are commonplace on the internet in such spaces as Zombieresearch.net. Whilst many of these sites feature decidedly tongue in cheek engagement with the notion of the zombie apocalypse, the users of fora for games like Left 4 Dead and Dead Island tend to debate this directly in the terms of the games themselves, discussing their relative merits or realism. Some of these games also highlight the specific pleasures of identifying the zombie as protagonist of sorts. In discussing this I will return to online gaming and the Left 4 Dead games in which players may compete online as part of the zombie horde. Such games raise major questions for the issues of identification and immersion that are said to be at the centre of the game experience. I will also explore the parodic pleasures of many flash games that situate the player in the role of spreading zombie infections. Throughout this article I aim to demonstrate that the zombie in game culture is less a cultural metaphor than a combination of utilitarian antagonist and a persistent aesthetic; a means of providing style or pleasure to many games that relies on the intertextual and flexible nature of the zombie as popular cultural phenomenon.
    • The Ukrainian crisis, the Crimean referendum and security implications for the European Union

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, Skopje, 2014-12-01)
    • British invasion: The crosscurrents of musical influence

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-11)
      Before The Beatles landed on American shores in February 1964 only two British acts had topped the Billboard singles chart. In the first quarter of 1964, however, the Beatles alone accounted for sixty percent of all recorded music sold in the United States; in 1964 and 1965 British acts occupied the number one position for 52 of the 104 weeks; and from 1964 through to 1970, the Rolling Stones, Herman’s Hermits, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Kinks, the Hollies, the Yardbirds and the Who placed more than one hundred and thirty songs on the American Top Forty. In The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence, Simon Philo illustrates how this remarkable event in cultural history disrupted and even reversed pop culture’s flow of influence, goods, and ideas—orchestrating a dramatic turn-around in the commercial fortunes of British pop in North America that turned the 1960s into “The Sixties.” Focusing on key works and performers, The British Invasion tracks the journey of this musical phenomenon from peripheral irrelevance through exotic novelty into the heart of mainstream rock. Throughout, Philo explores how and why British music from the period came to achieve such unprecedented heights of commercial, artistic, and cultural dominance. The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence will appeal to fans, students and scholars of popular music history—indeed anyone interested in understanding the fascinating relationship between popular music and culture.
    • The Europe of tomorrow: creative, digital, integrated

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College Skopje, 2014-05-15)
      How can investment in the cultural and creative sectors sustain development and social cohesion? How can ICTs contribute to a growth in productivity, jobs and competitiveness, whilst improving social inclusion and helping to reduce the negative impact on the environment? Can regional and cross-border co-operation foster better integration and good neighbourhood relations? This said, is Europe lurching out of economic crisis into a new Cold War, given the wider implications of the Ukrainian crisis to European security? In the wake of the European financial crisis, how should we deal with the political and social dangers to European integration of a dramatic growth in youth employment and the rise of right wig extremism? How can we foster a European education? These are some of the important questions addressed in this book which seeks to critically address the opportunities for building a stronger European Union - one that relies on creativity, innovation and digital technologies whilst strengthening its basic values of freedom and society.