• Cultural and historical geographies of the arboretum

      Elliott, Paul; Watkins, Charles; Daniels, Stephen; University of Derby; university of Nottingham (Garden History Society (Gardens Trust), 2007)
      Arboretums were innovative and important developments in British, and ultimately global, landscape gardening during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Inspired by British and European traditions of landscape gardening, horticulture, agricultural improvement and botany, they were imbued with symbolism and meaning according to the circumstances of their creation, character and usage. For some nineteenth-century landscape gardeners and horticulturists, they offered global excursions in microcosm providing rational recreation, aesthetic enjoyment and botanical experimentation. Their systematic planting promoted an image of rational, objective science and appropriate behavioural responses, helping to differentiate and shape Victorian middle-class identity. However, the complex relationships between designs, management, botanical displays, organic agencies and consumption ensured contested and contingent responses and appropriations.
    • Delivering drama: drama in education practitioner Ava Hunt on what it's like to work in a war-torn region

      Hunt, Ava (Arts Industry, 2008-10-24)
      An account of the challenges of introducing drama skills to English teachers in Sri Lanka, against complex social issues of a war torn country.
    • The Derby Philosophers: Science and Culture in British Urban Society, 1700-1850

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (Manchester University Press, 2009)
      The Derby Philosophers focuses upon the activities of a group of Midland intellectuals that included the evolutionist and physician Erasmus Darwin, Rev. Thomas Gisborne the evangelical philosopher and poet, Robert Bage the novelist, Charles Sylvester the chemist and engineer, William George and his son Herbert Spencer, the internationally renowned evolutionist philosopher who coined the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’, and members of the Wedgwood and Strutt families. The book explores how, inspired by science and through educational activities, publications and institutions including the famous Derbyshire General Infirmary (1810) and Derby Arboretum (1840), the Derby philosophers strove to promote social, political and urban improvements with national and international consequences. Much more than a parochial history of one intellectual group or town, this book examines science, politics and culture during one of the most turbulent periods of British history, an age of political and industrial revolutions in which the Derby philosophers were closely involved.
    • Disciplinary social policy and the failing promise of the new middle classes: the troubled families programme

      Tepe-Belfrage, Daniela; Nunn, Alex; University of Derby; University of Liverpool (Cambridge University Press, 2016-10-17)
      This article looks at the promise of the ‘New Middle Class’ (NMC) inherent in the neoliberal ideological ideal of individualising societal responsibility for well-being and success. The article points to how this promise enables a discourse and practice of welfare reform and a disciplining of life styles particularly targeting the very poor in society. Women and some ethnic minorities are particularly prone to poverty and then therefore also discipline. The article then provides a case study of the Troubled Families Programme (TFP) and shows how the programme and the way it is constructed and managed partly undermines the provision of the material needs to alleviate people from poverty and re-produces discourses of poor lifestyle and parenting choices as sources of poverty, thereby undermining the ‘middle-class’ promise.
    • ‘Don’t Talk into my Talk’:oral narratives, cultural identity & popular performance in Colonial Uganda

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (James Currey, 2010-11-18)
      Performance in colonial Uganda was dominated by dance and song, although individual technical mastery of dance, song, and instrumentation was a prerogative of the professional performers and court musicians who played at the royal courts, beer parties, and market places. There are limited written materials available on indigenous performances of the colonial period in Buganda. However, the existence of a corpus of archival Luganda musical recordings, going back to the 1930s, and oral narratives of aged people, gives us an insight into performance activities of this period. Old musical recordings help us to understand various forms of performance about which we know little, and contribute to aspects of performance that have shaped contemporary Ugandan theatre. The essay identifies popular performances a form existing before colonisation, how these were ‘documented’ and what has survived. It examines how the texts, impacted on by complex colonial and missionary systems reveal syncretised popular performance infrastructures. Finally, it explores the notion of the body as a “memory” reflecting on selected Ugandan indigenous aesthetics of performance.
    • Drama in coalfields and paddyfields

      Hunt, Ava (2008-09)
      Drawing on a range of different drama practitioners Ava Hunt reflects on her experience and challenges of delivering drama in Sri Lanka
    • Druids Hill

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Five Leaves, 2008)
      A novel
    • East African theatres and performances

      Kasule, Samuel; Osita, Okagbue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020)
      The focus of the book is primarily performance and its dialectical relationship with culture and society in East African theatre practices and traditions. A secondary interest pursued in the book is a broader exploration and articulation of the concept of performance, much in the same way that Schechner (2002: 34) proposes it to encompass a myriad of human activities that are perceived to be “restored behaviour” or “twice behaved behaviours”. The book explores the relationship between dance, dialogue, music, recitation, song, and the theatrical performance as inscribed in various indigenous concepts. It further centres on the insights into the nature of theatre and/or performance as a cultural practice and an art form, and theatre’s relationship to culture and identity. It examines indigenous performance processes and structures that include staging techniques, proxemic principles, design and its realisation, performer-spectator relationship, the non-professionalism of the different categories of performers and theatre makers in East Africa. The study takes account of the mix of representational and presentational modes of performance, aligned to predominantly non-script-based theatre practices, which sharply contrast with the often highly stylized forms of many Asian performance traditions as well as the often realistic modes of performance of some other non-African traditions. By examining both the indigenous performance forms and practices and the ways in which their work is conceptualized, developed, and staged, this study demonstrates the potential influence of African thought and aesthetics on aspects of global contemporary theatre and performance.
    • The echo of Tlatelolco in contemporary Mexican protest poetry

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2005)
      The shooting of a student demonstration in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in the Tlatelolco district of Mexico City on 2 October 1968 has been the subject of many literary works, among which the Tlatelolco poetry addresses not only the event itself but also the aftermath of the massacre. Both approaches examine the relationship between the ‘yo’/‘nosotros’ and ‘ellos’ constructs, focusing on the ‘nosotros’ construct as the result of this interaction. The following analysis of this process is based on the theory of self and Other, especially René Girard's theory of the mimetics of violence and the process of scapegoating as a basis for the relationship between the individual and society within the context of a violent conflict.
    • Eleventh annual international academic conference on European integration borders: Imagined or real

      Hudson, Robert; University of Derby (2016)
      This volume is made up of selection of peer-reviewed chapters originally presented at the 11th international conference entitled: “Borders: Imagined or Real” which was held in Skopje on 21 May 2016. The main goal of the conference had been to provide an in-depth examination of the concepts of borders which over the years have been shown to have a strong presence and impact upon European societies, particularly with regard to their development and growth. Certainly, from a European Union perspective it cannot be denied that cross-border cooperation is one of the key phenomena that both characterizes and influences the current process of European integration. As such the conference sought to raise an awareness of the importance of the study of borders, and whether or not they are driven by territoriality or by government policy, through an investigation of their dynamic structures and elements. The conference also sought to explore new and alternative scenarios in the shaping and visualization of borders set against the concept of European integration from a critical and forward-looking perspective.
    • Enlightenment, Modernity and Science: Geographies of Scientific Culture and Improvement in Georgian England

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (I. B. Tauris, 2010)
      Scientific culture was one of the defining characteristics of the English Enlightenment. The latest discoveries were debated in homes, institutions and towns around the country. But how did the dissemination of scientific knowledge vary with geographical location? What were the differing influences in town and country and from region to region? Enlightenment, Modernity and Science provides the first full length study of the geographies of Georgian scientific culture in England. The author takes the reader on a tour of the principal arenas in which scientific ideas were disseminated, including home, town and countryside, to show how cultures of science and knowledge varied across the Georgian landscape. Taking in key figures such as Erasmus Darwin, Abraham Bennett, and Joseph Priestley along the way, it is a work that sheds important light on the complex geographies of Georgian English scientific culture.
    • The Europe of tomorrow: creative, digital, integrated

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College Skopje, 2014-05-15)
      How can investment in the cultural and creative sectors sustain development and social cohesion? How can ICTs contribute to a growth in productivity, jobs and competitiveness, whilst improving social inclusion and helping to reduce the negative impact on the environment? Can regional and cross-border co-operation foster better integration and good neighbourhood relations? This said, is Europe lurching out of economic crisis into a new Cold War, given the wider implications of the Ukrainian crisis to European security? In the wake of the European financial crisis, how should we deal with the political and social dangers to European integration of a dramatic growth in youth employment and the rise of right wig extremism? How can we foster a European education? These are some of the important questions addressed in this book which seeks to critically address the opportunities for building a stronger European Union - one that relies on creativity, innovation and digital technologies whilst strengthening its basic values of freedom and society.
    • Flirting with space: journeys and creativity

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2010)
      The idea of ‘flirting’ with space is central to this book. Space is conceptualized as being in constant flux as we make our way through contexts in our daily lives, considered in relation to encounters with complexities and flows of materiality. Through considerations of dynamic processes of contemporary life-spaces, the book engages the inter-relations of space and journeys, and how creativity happens in those inter-relations. Unravelled through wide-ranging investigations, this book builds new critical syntheses of the intertwining of space and life: the mundane and exotic, ‘lay’ and ‘artistic’. The book creates a fascinating and original view of our interaction with space.
    • Flirting with space: thinking landscape relationally

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2013-04-26)
      For over a decade landscape has been exemplary of the critical debates between representational and so-called non-representational theories affecting cultural geographies. At the same time discussions concerning mobility contest the familiar emphasis upon the habitual and situated character of landscape and its role in the work of representations. This article offers a contribution to the growing awareness of a need to try and engage these debates surrounding landscape across geographical, anthropological, cultural and art theory amongst others. It considers different debates on landscape through the notion of spacing particularly in terms of how we understand artwork and representation, insistently in comparison with wider kinds of practice. Landscape is considered as the expressive-poetics of spacing in a way that makes possible a dynamic relationality between representations and practices both situated and mobile. Keywords art practice, landscape, performativity, poetics, spacing
    • From Blood Simple to True Grit: A Conversation about the Coen Brothers’ Cinematic West

      Campbell, Neil; Kollin, Susan; Mitchell, Lee Clark; Tatum, Stephen; University of Derby (2013)
      A roundtable discussion of the Coen brothers western films in which I discuss The Big Lebowski as a postwestern
    • Gardens and gardening

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2009)
      The garden has been an informing metaphor for geographical thought for sometime and as an affective material object and gardening as a process in the figuring and refiguring of space. It has represented an ideal environment and culture, a rather pre-cultural, pre-human state in a number of world religions, and continues to reappear in contemporary geographical discussions of the sacred. These leitmotifs of human geography are significantly theorized through ideology, discourse, and power, where ‘the garden’ becomes iconic. Signifying identity as well as status, cultural capital and social difference, as well as social/cultural relations, the garden and ways of gardening emerge as expression. A more complex conceptualization of the garden and gardening emerge in debates concerning consumption, commodification, and identity. In recent decades, the garden as artifact has been increasingly transformed to gardening as practice and as significant in developing critical conceptual approaches to a range of ‘new’ cultural geographies. These shifts and developments accompany the increasing geographical interest in process, practice, and performance. The ‘nature’ dimensions relating to, and perhaps informed by, gardens and gardening emerge in new ways in terms of the conceptualizations of nature where significance and meaning may emerge through practice, and in relation to the nonhuman; and debates concerning the ethical and moral in human geography, including shifting symbolism of the garden and of gardening in relation to war and peace. These developments in human geographies have been enmeshed with wider humanities and social science thinking and beyond these, from art theory and social anthropology to environmental debate.
    • Gdansk: national identity in the Polish German Borderlands

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Pluto Press, 1989)
      A study of National Identity in the Polish-German Borderlands
    • The Great War and British identity

      Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
      In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.