• S/Z/COOPER/COOPER: Barthes with Twin Peaks: The Return

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Cardiff University, 2020-11-12)
    • "The Seam of Something Else Unnamed": Sebastian Barry's Days Without End

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-07-21)
      This essay examines Sebastian Barry's Days Without End as a novel that examines and critiques conventions of the American West through its consideration of alternative communities of sexuality. Using theoretical frames drawn from performativity studies, it explores how terrible prejudices of race, gender and sexuality can be challenged.
    • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
      This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
    • Shaping public opinion in a time of colonial conflict: media allegations of the use of torture by the French army in the first Vietnam war

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (2019-10)
      This article is set against the broader background of editorial comment and eye-witness reportage in the French printed media on France's war of decolonisation in Indochina and Algeria between 1946 and 1962. It focuses on one particular aspect of this period, namely the allegations of misconduct by the French army during this conflict, which is also known as the First Vietnam War (1946 - 1954) as part of the Vietnamese liberation struggle against French colonial mastery. At the heart of this analysis lies the way in which the conflict was represented in three key journals in France at the time. The journals, 'Les Temps modernes', 'Temoignage Chretien' and 'Esprit', all still publishing, were vociferous in their criticism of the general conduct of the war, whilst 'Les Temps modernes' and 'Temoignage Chretien' laid particular emphasis on the use of repressive measures by members of the French Expeditionary Forces against the indigenous population of Vietnam, before 1950.
    • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
      This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.
    • Solaris - Lem/Tarkovsky/Soderbergh: adaptations in space

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Gylphi, 2013)
    • Space, living, atmospheres, affectivities

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017-10)
    • Strange days: might as well face it you're addicted

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Cambria Press, 2012)
    • The sunshine soundtrack as aural attraction

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Routledge, 2011)
      Abstract The relationship between image track and soundtrack within film has generally privileged the moving image. Early cinema and contemporary special effects cinema have both been described as a ‘cinema of attractions’ due to the emphasis upon special effects and computer-generated imagery. Within science fiction the importance of image has been emphasised as a way of conveying alien environments and new technology. Drawing on the work of writers on sound such as Chion and Sonnenschein, on Mikhail Bakhtin's notion of the chronotope and the idea of the sublime, this paper explores the ways in which soundtrack fulfils the role of ‘aural attraction’ as an alternative way of understanding the function of sound within science fiction film. Sunshine is a British science fiction film which charts the journey of a crew travelling into the sun in order to save the earth. The soundtrack is a collaboration between Underworld and John Murphy and it draws upon ambient and dance music in order to convey the atmosphere of fear, hope and the sublime when facing the sun. In evoking the space mission the soundtrack blends sound effects and musical score to provide an evocative aural composition which accentuates, extends and replaces the visual image within the film.
    • A synthesis of the role of media reports and elections in Nigerian democracy

      Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (Faculty of Social Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria., 2011)
      This paper examines the interplay between the media and the elections in Nigeria, and discusses some of the relevant communication models that could assist the media in effectively reporting future elections in the country. This study has employed a historical approach, and argues that since Nigeria attained its political independence in 1960; conducting free and fair elections has been the major political problem in the country. The paper observed that the June 12 1993 Presidential Elections resulted in a stalemate, while the 2007 Elections were flawed with cases of electoral irregularities. Many of the results of the elections that were approved earlier by the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) were later cancelled by the Nigerian Judiciary, a confirmation that the elections were rigged as confirmed by most of the internal and the external observers that monitored the elections. As a part of the solutions to the problem of elections in Nigeria, this paper recommends the establishment of an Inter-Party Central Committee (ICPP), made up of the national executives of the registered political parties, to work in collaboration with the media as the committee supports the electoral commission to conduct free and fair elections in the country.
    • Television dramas as memory screens

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2011)
      Abstract: Within this article I am focus upon the construction of both social and personal memories within the television drama, drawing upon Landsberg’s notion of prosthetic memory and King’s identification of ‘afterwardsness’ as ways of comprehending the construction of memory and the past within texts. The examples are The Long Walk to Finchley (Tony Saint, BBC 4, 2008) and Life on Mars (2007-8). Both dramas share a number of concerns yet each has a very different context within British television. The relationship between viewers’ adopting memories from the dramas and incorporating these into their own sets of memories, including my own memories of the dramas is considered. Equally, the negotiation of the media and public discourses as memory screens with which we interact is a primary concern.
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2017-07-19)
      Key debates in the domain of ‘Theory on Theory’ have this year focused upon the legacies of the theorists grouped together under the name ‘poststructuralism’, often drawing on material made available in recent decades by Barthes, Foucault and Deleuze which adds new facets to critical understanding of their work. Reflecting on their contributions, it appears that individual theorists can illuminate or extend each other’s oeuvres: Foucault in particular has attracted considerable attention in this vein in 2016, with books appearing which respectively place his ideas alongside those of Marx, Derrida and Deleuze. His lectures on ‘governmentality’, meanwhile, have prompted some to claim that his account of neoliberalism therein demonstrated a ‘quiet appreciation’ of it (Peter Fleming, The Mythology of Work: How Capitalism Persists Despite Itself (Pluto Press [2015]), p. 45). Turning to Barthes, we find re-evaluations...
    • 'They got to go': SKA versus America

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014-01)
      Dynamics of Interconnections in Popular Culture(s) is an eclectic and free-ranging collection of articles grounded in a combination of the social sciences with the populist humanities. The collection is further unified by an approach that considers changes and linkages within and between cultural systems as evidenced through their respective popular cultures. The key underlying assumption is that our collective popular expressions create an arena of global cultural exchange, further precipitating new cultural adaptations, expressions, and connections. The volume is divided into two sections. The first consists of articles investigating theoretical and methodological approaches to the dynamics of history and cultural changes. These include cultural anthropology, history, economics, and sociology. The second section is made up of explorations into a myriad of cultural practices and expressions that exemplify not only the wide diversity of popular cultures and their workings, but also the interconnections between and within those cultural systems. A wide variety of specific case studies are presented to evidence and support the more general points made in the previous section. The collection demonstrates that the everyday lives of ordinary people, while varying from culture to culture, are unified through their expressions of shared humanity.
    • Thirteenth annual international academic conference on European Integration Europe and the Balkans

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, 2018-05-17)
      How is the Berlin Process helping the Balkan States in their aspirations towards full European Union integration? What lessons can successful East European EU member states give to the six aspirant Western Balkan states; and , how can we use perichoresis in reconsidering Balkanism? These are just some of the questions addressed in this volume, which also includes chapters on the growth of Russian soft power in the Balkans, the impact of the emigration of skilled workers from the Balkans on the regional economy and aspirations for EU integration, and how over-long periods of transition have fed into Euro-scepticism.
    • This Time and Now: identity & belonging in the Irish Diaspora: the Irish in Britain and second generational silence

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Rodopi Press, 2012)
      The Irish in Britain have only recently been granted ethnic status. This blind spot which existed towards the Irish community, even as highly visible negative assumptions about the Irish circulated, resulted in a strange invisibility which simultaneously derided as it denied Irish identity, and failed to acknowledge the Irish as an ethnic group. This has effected how the generation born from the 1950’s/60’s migration into England can both consider and describe their notion of identity. Silence, denial and over identification reveal how the sense of non belonging, or ‘otherness’ is a common touch stone, and identification as a constant outsider is a prominent note. Criticisms of national identity levelled against the second generation from within the community reveal attitudes about ownership of a ‘nationhood’ which is still contested ground. Identity displayed through those visible traditions which are frequently stronger in displaced communities can not be taken as the sole markers of national belonging as memories, silences and post memories impact on such constantly evolving groups as are created by emigration. Historic patterns and beliefs which are traceable through the images, stories and customs which were originally brought over create an image bank with which the generation born in England might consider and negotiate its relationship to nation and home. This paper asks whether the models this generation grew up with, and which have begun the journey from lived experience into literature and into folklore, can still have a relevant social function when we consider the idea of identity and belonging?
    • Tibet in the Western Imagination

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
      Neuhaus explores the roots of the long-standing European fascination with Tibet, from the Dalai Lama to the Abominable Snowman. Surveying a wide range of travel accounts, official documents, correspondence and fiction, he examines how different people thought about both Tibet and their home cultures.
    • Transitory literature or 'Brave New Text'? a comparative analysis of José Agustín's work

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2007)
      This paper presents an aspect of an ongoing research project on the changing nature of the text in the works of the Onda literary movement in Mexico in the mid to late 1960s. The works analysed in this article are the stories 'La tumba' (1963) and '¿Cuál es la onda?' (1968) by José Agustín. The aim of the paper is to examine the triad of the creation/destruction/recreation of the text by identifying the changing roles played by the narrator(s) and the dissolution of the protagonists. The analysis also addresses multiple transcultural influences on the two texts and determines whether the conflicting combination thereof leads to the complete destruction of the text or the appearance of a new narrative form.
    • The Ukrainian crisis, the Crimean referendum and security implications for the European Union

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, Skopje, 2014-12-01)
    • Under my (editorial) thumb: hegemonic masculinity and text ownership in the works of the Mexican Onda

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2010)
      Connell and Messerschmidt's article 'Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept' (2005) re-evaluates the popular term to produce 'a more complex model of gender hierarchy' (829). The notion of hierarchy influenced by power redistribution is the foundation of the present study of the works of the Mexican Onda movement. Instead of adopting an expected gender perspective, this article presents a study of text ownership based upon a narratological interpretation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a mechanism of controlling the text. The analysis will examine the power struggle between the first-person narrator and editor with a view to determining the effect this struggle has on character (re)creation. The study will employ Ricoeur's interpretation of non-linear narrative, and various studies of transculturation and its effect on the interpretations of literary texts. The texts analysed in this article include the story La tumba (1964) by José Agustín, Gustavo Sainz's novel Obsesivos días circulares (1969), and Parménides García Saldaña's short story 'Goodbye Belinda' from the collection El rey criollo (1971).
    • Under the Western Sky: Essays on the Fiction and Music of Willy Vlautin

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nevada Press, 2018)
      The first original collection of essays examining the work of Willy Vlautin as both musician and novelist, placing it within the contexts of western studies and wider theoretical frames such as critical regionalism, affect theory and cultural studies.