• Jan Kochanowski: Polish poet

      Tighe, Carl (2012-09)
    • KssssS

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2004)
      a novel
    • Landscape, land and identity: a performative consideration

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2012)
      This chapter considers ideas of land and identity processes through an original consideration of landscape. Following Taussig's argument that cultural meaning and identification are less constituted in institutionalised and ritualised signification than emergent in the performance of life, attention focuses upon the performative character of landscape and its relationality with land and identity.... Making land significant in life is considered through landscape in the notion of spacing. The notion of an everyday, gentle politics is introduced to the constitution of identities and feeling of land. Identities and values concerning land are produced relationally in the energy cracks between performativity and institutions, as the several investigations upon which this chapter draws testify.
    • Lived places of anarchy: Colin Ward’s social anarchy in action

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)
    • Making meaning and meaning making: memory, postmemory and narrative in Holocaust literature

      Flower, Annie; University of Derby (2013)
      This paper explores links between narration and memory in Holocaust literature and examines ways in which individuals construct memory and postmemory. Based on the premise that ‘All authors mediate reality through their writing...’ and taking into consideration that what we remember and how we remember is likely to have a significant impact on the narratives that we construct, this article considers the reliability of memory. It argues that whilst there is, at times, a blurring of boundaries between fact and fiction in Holocaust literature, this has little or no impact on the validity and authenticity of the narratives. In an attempt to address these issues more fully, this paper explores the notions of making meaning and meaning making, whilst considering the effects of positionality, time and trauma on memory. Key texts referred to in this discussion include Night (1958) by Elie Wiesel, All Rivers Run to the Sea (1996) by Elie Wiesel, In My Brother’s Shadow (2005) by Uwe Timm and The Dark Room (2001) by Rachel Seiffert. These texts have been chosen in order to highlight the subjectivity of memory and postmemory and to demonstrate the role that narrative plays in their construction and representation.
    • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

      Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
      This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
    • Marion Adnams: A singular woman

      Forde, Teresa; Wood, Val; Bamford, Lucy; University of Derby; Derby Museums and Art Gallery (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 02/12/2017)
      Retrospective of Marion Adnams' work: Marion Elizabeth Adnams was born in Derby in 1898 where she remained, for the most part, until her death, aged ninety-six. During the course of her long life, she forged a reputation as a painter of deeply distinctive and dream-like visions inspired by the Surrealist movement. Adnams exhibited almost continuously in London and regional art galleries from the late 1930s and examples of her work can be found in many public collections, alongside that of her friends and contemporaries Evelyn Gibbs and Eileen Agar. Despite this, her work is largely forgotten today. This important exhibition brings together the full and diverse range of her art for the first time in almost fifty years in a bid to recapture the legacy of this most remarkable artist. This exhibition was made possible with support from Art Fund. This exhibition was curated in partnership with Val Wood, independent researcher, and Teresa Forde, Senior Lecturer in Film and Media at the University of Derby.
    • The media, ethnicity and religion as determinants of failed republics in Nigeria

      Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby; Benson Idahosa University (Delmas Communications Ltd, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria, 2010-10)
      This paper analyses the covert influence of ethnicity and religion on the media and voting in Nigerian elections and demonstrates how previous Nigerian republics have been hindered because of the impact of ethnic disservice and election crises, thereby providing opportunities for the military to topple each of those failed civilian administrations. Unfortunately, the press could not play a meaningful role in the 1964/65 election crises because the leaders of the factional groups in those conflicts were equally the owners of the early newspapers. So, they simply converted their papers into channels for fighting wars of personal vendetta. In fact, ethnic rivalry and religious intolerance are today the two major sources of conflict in Nigerian politics. For these reasons the paper advises the media to avoid playing the role of an advocate in the support of individuals and governmental agencies as well as ethnic nationality whose aims and objectives are inimical to the national interest and religious tolerance among the Nigerian public.
    • A New Gentleness: Affective Ficto-Regionality

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-11-01)
      Using affective critical regionality to enable a re-valuing of the local as a powerful means to appreciate the everyday and the overlooked as vital elements within a more inclusive understanding of how we live.
    • New Media and the Arab Spring of 2011

      Hudson, Robert Charles; Oboh, Godwin Ehiarekhian; University of Derby (Delmas Communications Ltd, 2012-09-07)
    • Not sucking in the seventies: The Rolling Stones and the myth of decline

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-10-29)
      This article reappraises the Stones’ “lost years.” However, in covering their reputation-imperiling half-decade between 1973 and 1978, it reaches back to the band’s fabled 1960s heyday and forward to its “revival” in order to identify continuities in practice and performance to counter the critical orthodoxy. Through the ’70s, the Rolling Stones released eight studio albums and one live set and toured almost annually; and, while their growing number of critics were keen to charge them with treason, their growing number of fans were evidently untroubled by the band’s often-cited crimes against the “ideology of rock.” I am not simply proposing, though, that healthy sales should be mobilized to bust the myth of decline. For, if not always “ahead of the game,” the Stones had a creatively meaningful relationship with some of the decade’s key musical developments—glam, disco, punk, and reggae. So, far from standing still artistically, gazing glassily at their elegantly wasted navels, stupefied by narcotics and cocooned by their bank balances, the Rolling Stones did some of their best work in this period—from the glam-ballad “Angie” through the funky dread of “Finger Print File” to the lo-fi energy of “Respectable.”
    • Nothing but the Truth, take two: fighting for the reader in the Tlatelolco 1968 discourse

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2012-04)
      The hypothesis put forward in this project is that there are two mechanisms of creating a collective memory of the event: one is hegemonic (dominated by state discourses and, potentially, academic studies of the shooting), and the other is posthegemonic (dominated by literary and popular discourses). We also posit that neither mechanism produces or even aims to produce an accurate representation of the event; instead, the two systems control cognitive and affective domains in collective conscience. The present paper will compare the way the two mechanisms are used in the contemporary analyses of the Tlatelolco massacre. The two works in question are Roberto Blanco Moheno, Tlatelolco: historia de una infamia (1969), and Guillermo Balám, Tlatelolco: Reflexiones de un testigo (1969). I aim to determine whether the two authors, apparently representing the opposing camps in the Tlatelolco discourse, approach the representation of the massacre from two divergent perspectives or whether their texts are characterised by the unity of the mechanisms involved in creating a memory of the event in the collective conscience.
    • The Orrery/The Orrery: between image and object

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2012)
    • Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2020-12-18)
      Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of the Irish diaspora who emigrated to Derby in the 1950s and 60s primarily. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project acts as a recognition of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It also offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and Britain.
    • Pax: variations

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2000)
      a novel
    • Photocinema:the creative edges of photography and film

      Campbell, Neil; Cramerotti, Alfredo; University of Derby (Intellect Books, 2013)
      Taking as its starting point the notion of photocinema—or the interplay of the still and moving image—the photographs, interviews, and critical essays in this volume explore the ways in which the two media converge and diverge, expanding the boundaries of each in interesting and unexpected ways. The book’s innovative approach to film and photography produces a hybrid “third space,” where the whole becomes much more than the sum of its individual parts, encouraging viewers to expand their perceptions to begin to understand the bigger picture. Photocinema represents a nuanced theoretical and practical exploration of the experimental cinematic techniques exemplified by artists like Wim Wenders and Hollis Frampton. In addition to new critical essays by Victor Burgin and David Campany, the book includes interviews with Martin Parr, Hannah Starkey, and Aaron Schuman and a portfolio of photographs from various new and established artists.
    • The Playwrights’ Register

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Yr Academi Gymreig, 1984)
    • Poland translated: post-Communist writing in Poland: a survey

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Springer Verlag, 2010)