• Flirting with space: journeys and creativity

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2010)
      The idea of ‘flirting’ with space is central to this book. Space is conceptualized as being in constant flux as we make our way through contexts in our daily lives, considered in relation to encounters with complexities and flows of materiality. Through considerations of dynamic processes of contemporary life-spaces, the book engages the inter-relations of space and journeys, and how creativity happens in those inter-relations. Unravelled through wide-ranging investigations, this book builds new critical syntheses of the intertwining of space and life: the mundane and exotic, ‘lay’ and ‘artistic’. The book creates a fascinating and original view of our interaction with space.
    • Flirting with space: thinking landscape relationally

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2013-04-26)
      For over a decade landscape has been exemplary of the critical debates between representational and so-called non-representational theories affecting cultural geographies. At the same time discussions concerning mobility contest the familiar emphasis upon the habitual and situated character of landscape and its role in the work of representations. This article offers a contribution to the growing awareness of a need to try and engage these debates surrounding landscape across geographical, anthropological, cultural and art theory amongst others. It considers different debates on landscape through the notion of spacing particularly in terms of how we understand artwork and representation, insistently in comparison with wider kinds of practice. Landscape is considered as the expressive-poetics of spacing in a way that makes possible a dynamic relationality between representations and practices both situated and mobile. Keywords art practice, landscape, performativity, poetics, spacing
    • From Blood Simple to True Grit: A Conversation about the Coen Brothers’ Cinematic West

      Campbell, Neil; Kollin, Susan; Mitchell, Lee Clark; Tatum, Stephen; University of Derby (2013)
      A roundtable discussion of the Coen brothers western films in which I discuss The Big Lebowski as a postwestern
    • Gardens and gardening

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2009)
      The garden has been an informing metaphor for geographical thought for sometime and as an affective material object and gardening as a process in the figuring and refiguring of space. It has represented an ideal environment and culture, a rather pre-cultural, pre-human state in a number of world religions, and continues to reappear in contemporary geographical discussions of the sacred. These leitmotifs of human geography are significantly theorized through ideology, discourse, and power, where ‘the garden’ becomes iconic. Signifying identity as well as status, cultural capital and social difference, as well as social/cultural relations, the garden and ways of gardening emerge as expression. A more complex conceptualization of the garden and gardening emerge in debates concerning consumption, commodification, and identity. In recent decades, the garden as artifact has been increasingly transformed to gardening as practice and as significant in developing critical conceptual approaches to a range of ‘new’ cultural geographies. These shifts and developments accompany the increasing geographical interest in process, practice, and performance. The ‘nature’ dimensions relating to, and perhaps informed by, gardens and gardening emerge in new ways in terms of the conceptualizations of nature where significance and meaning may emerge through practice, and in relation to the nonhuman; and debates concerning the ethical and moral in human geography, including shifting symbolism of the garden and of gardening in relation to war and peace. These developments in human geographies have been enmeshed with wider humanities and social science thinking and beyond these, from art theory and social anthropology to environmental debate.
    • Gdansk: national identity in the Polish German Borderlands

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Pluto Press, 1989)
      A study of National Identity in the Polish-German Borderlands
    • The Great War and British identity

      Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
      In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.
    • A 'History of the Present': reflections on the representation of History in peace and conflict research in Hudson, Robert, C. and Heintze, Hans - Joachim (eds), Different approaches to peace and conflict research

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University of Deusto Press, Bilbao, Spain, 2008)
      For Hudson, history of the present is, at its simplest level, history without hindsight but with insight, and it is this that makes it different from other forms of history, and necessitates also that the historian of the present borrows methodologies, ideologies and practice from other academic disciplines. The historian of the present is an interdisciplinarian. Being a historian of the presnt often entails fieldwork and conducting interviews rather than working in the 'dusty' archives normally associated with the work of the more conventional historian. Indeed, to some extent the historian of the present works very much more like an anthropologist, or even like a journalist, rather than the so-called 'traditional' historian. The historian of the presnt should have a deep knowledge of the culture of the area that they are researching and representing. This involves insight, and this insight is given more credibility if the historian knows the language(s) of the area concerned and has mastered, or at least engaged in other disciplines, such as literature, or anthropology, politics and languages.
    • Holy cards & bubble gum.

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (2013-04)
      The hagiography represents the edited versions of a life, and presents us only with those things we are supposed to know. Those details glimpsed behind the official version of a life are often the most interesting. Just as Vasari listened to gossip to produce his Lives of the Artists, we have this urge to listen in, to discover the alternative lives behind the official versions. The Lives of the Saints offer endless possibilities to re-imagine and to reposition current needs behind those paragons of virtue. In this workshop I will flip over the Holy Cards to reveal a different set of circumstances beneath the saint’s day. Every day has its saint, every place has its patron, and every occupation has its guardian.. Some of the stories will be genuine, others invented, but it is not always easy to tell which are the real and which are the impossible saints.
    • How can a war be holy? Weimar attitudes towards Eastern spirituality

      Neuhaus, Tom; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
    • “I smoked them out”: Perspectives on the emergence of folk opera or ‘musical plays’ in Uganda.

      Kasule, Sam; University of Derby (Boydell and Brewer, 2020-11-20)
      Music is often cited as a central artistic mode in African theatre and performance practices. However, little attention has been paid to music theatre on the continent in general, and to opera in particular, with the exceptions of a few noted genres, such as Concert Party or the Yoruba "folk opera" of the 1960s, and the emerging research on opera culture in South Africa. This volume of African Theatre highlights the diversity across the continent from a variety of perspectives - including those of genre, media, and historiography. Above all, it raises questions and encourages debate: What does "opera" mean in African and African diasporic contexts? What are its practices and legacies - colonial, postcolonial and decolonial; what is its relation to the intersectionalities of race and class? How do opera and music theatre reflect, change or obscure social, political and economic realities? How are they connected to educational and cultural institutions, and non-profit organisations? And why is opera contradictorily, at various times, perceived as both "grand" and "elitist, "folk" and "quotidian", "Eurocentric" and "indigenous"? Contributors also address aesthetic transformation processes, the porousness of genre boundaries and the role of space and place, with examples ranging from Egypt to South Africa, from Uganda to West Africa and the USA. The playscript in this volume is We Take Care of Our Own by Zainabu Jallo GUEST EDITORS: Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo & Hilde Roos Series Editors: Yvette Hutchison, Reader, Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, University of Warwick; Chukwuma Okoye, Reader in African Theatre & Performance University of Ibadan; Jane Plastow, Professor of African Theatre, University of Leeds.
    • The IMF and a new global politics of inequality?

      Nunn, Alex; White, Paul; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University (Australian Political Economy Movement, 2017-01)
      This paper addresses a simple, and largely empirical, research question: is the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) recent high level commitment to reducing inequality translated into concrete action in its dealings with member states? Addressing this research question is significant in several respects. First, the high level rhetorical commitment to reduce inequality might be seen as paradoxical because the IMF, alongside other institutions of global economic management, has long been criticised for its role in promoting economic reform in member countries, partly on the basis that this increases inequality (Peet et al. 2009; Kentikelenis et al. 2016: 550-1). It is therefore important to assess the extent to which recent pronouncements on inequality by the Fund suggest a change in emphasis or a genuine institutional commitment. Second, addressing the question contributes to a contemporary academic literature on more technical aspects of how we should understand and interpret IMF policy advice and conditionality. This literature currently focusses on a range of aspects of IMF policy advice, but does not address the recent interest of the Fund in inequality. The paper addresses this lacuna.
    • Informant disavowal and the interpretation of storytelling revival

      Heywood, Simon; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2004)
      The scholarship of traditional arts revivals is often ironic. Revivalists’ activity has been understood as a rational, politically nostalgic, and symbolic re-enactment of a fictional past. In this, scholars have underestimated the significance of disavowal; that is, informants’ neutral or negative responses to analytical methods and conclusions. Interviews with English storytelling revivalists reveal a coherent and significant consensus of disavowal, showing their primary concern to be not with nostalgic self-rationalisation, but with basic practical issues of artistic and sociable interaction. Storytelling revival involves nostalgic displays that are actually fragmentary, superficial, and subordinate to practical concerns. This suggests that revivalists are seeking not to symbolise an imagined past for political purposes, but to familiarise recently appropriated performance genres for artistic purposes. This conclusion is hypothetically applicable to the uses of nostalgic rationalisation within other revival movements.
    • Jan Kochanowski: Polish poet

      Tighe, Carl (2012-09)
    • KssssS

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2004)
      a novel
    • Landscape, land and identity: a performative consideration

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (2012)
      This chapter considers ideas of land and identity processes through an original consideration of landscape. Following Taussig's argument that cultural meaning and identification are less constituted in institutionalised and ritualised signification than emergent in the performance of life, attention focuses upon the performative character of landscape and its relationality with land and identity.... Making land significant in life is considered through landscape in the notion of spacing. The notion of an everyday, gentle politics is introduced to the constitution of identities and feeling of land. Identities and values concerning land are produced relationally in the energy cracks between performativity and institutions, as the several investigations upon which this chapter draws testify.
    • Lived places of anarchy: Colin Ward’s social anarchy in action

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)