• Affective landscapes in literature, art, and everyday life: memory, place and the senses.

      Christine Berberich,; Neil Campbel; Robert Hudson; University of Derby (Ashgate., 2016-03-09)
      Bringing together a diverse group of scholars representing the fields of cultural and literary studies, cultural politics and history, creative writing and photography, this collection examines the different ways in which human beings respond to, debate and interact with landscape. How do we feel, sense, know, cherish, memorise, imagine, dream, desire or even fear landscape? What are the specific qualities of experience that we can locate in the spaces in and through which we live? While the essays most often begin with the broadly literary - the memoir, the travelogue, the novel, poetry - the contributors approach the topic in diverse and innovative ways. The collection is divided into five sections: ’Peripheral Cultures’, dealing with dislocation and imagined landscapes'; ’Memory and Mobility’, concerning the road as the scene of trauma and movement; ’Suburbs and Estates’, contrasting American and English spaces; ’Literature and Place’, foregrounding the fluidity of the fictional and the real and the human and nonhuman; and finally, ’Sensescapes’, tracing the sensory response to landscape. Taken together, the essays interrogate important issues about how we live now and might live in the future.
    • Alternative schooling

      Flower, Annie; Cottle, Vanessa; University of Derby (Pearson Education Limited, 2011)
      This chapter provides you with a general introduction to approaches to education and school curricula by considering examples of schools from Europe and the USA, which have a role in providing alternative curricula to the English National Curriculum and also considers educational policy.
    • Amongst Barbarian: Ovid, the Classics and creative writing

      McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Routledge, 2010-09)
      Despite still being viewed as a non-legitimate subject, Creative Writing has injected life into areas once considered essential to an education, but now under threat in many universities. At degree level it has created an opportunity to re-engage with the classics by its insistence on its own history, while its non-traditional methodologies provide a different way for students to engage with early texts. Ovid's Metamorphoses lends itself to Creative Writing development. Such students, who are used to engaging with a subject practically, will have been equipped with the tools necessary to work with this. Their creative mindset allows the main work of reinterpretation necessary for the study of such early stories. The study for clues which point towards earlier methods (repetition, formal patterns, framework structures) which occur in such primary literature allows students to realise the evolution of a story, and understand that this is never a static process, but one of continuous engagement which the Metamorphoses above all others, seems to welcome.
    • 'An Asseblage of Habits' : D.J. Waldie and Neil Campbell - A Suburban Conversation

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (2011)
      I edited this special edition on western suburbia, selected the images and interviewed the writer D.J. Waldie for the journal.
    • "An assemblage of habits": D. J. Waldie and Neil Campbell—a suburban conversation

      Waldie, D. J.; Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (Utah State, 2011)
    • The British Arboretum: Trees, Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (Pickering and Chatto, 2011)
      This study explores the science and culture of nineteenth-century British arboretums, or tree collections. The development of arboretums was fostered by a variety of factors, each of which is explored in detail: global trade and exploration, the popularity of collecting, the significance to the British economy and society, developments in Enlightenment science, changes in landscape gardening aesthetics and agricultural and horticultural improvement.Arboretums were idealized as microcosms of nature, miniature encapsulations of the globe and as living museums. This book critically examines different kinds of arboretum in order to understand the changing practical, scientific, aesthetic and pedagogical principles that underpinned their design, display and the way in which they were viewed. It is the first study of its kind and fills a gap in the literature on Victorian science and culture.
    • British invasion: The crosscurrents of musical influence

      Philo, Simon; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014-11)
      Before The Beatles landed on American shores in February 1964 only two British acts had topped the Billboard singles chart. In the first quarter of 1964, however, the Beatles alone accounted for sixty percent of all recorded music sold in the United States; in 1964 and 1965 British acts occupied the number one position for 52 of the 104 weeks; and from 1964 through to 1970, the Rolling Stones, Herman’s Hermits, the Dave Clark Five, the Animals, the Kinks, the Hollies, the Yardbirds and the Who placed more than one hundred and thirty songs on the American Top Forty. In The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence, Simon Philo illustrates how this remarkable event in cultural history disrupted and even reversed pop culture’s flow of influence, goods, and ideas—orchestrating a dramatic turn-around in the commercial fortunes of British pop in North America that turned the 1960s into “The Sixties.” Focusing on key works and performers, The British Invasion tracks the journey of this musical phenomenon from peripheral irrelevance through exotic novelty into the heart of mainstream rock. Throughout, Philo explores how and why British music from the period came to achieve such unprecedented heights of commercial, artistic, and cultural dominance. The British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence will appeal to fans, students and scholars of popular music history—indeed anyone interested in understanding the fascinating relationship between popular music and culture.
    • Burning Worm

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2001)
      a novel
    • Citizenship, community and democracy in India: from Bombay to Maharashtra, c. 1930 to 1960.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Routledge, 2018-02-05)
      This book delivers ground-breaking perspectives upon nascent conceptions and workings of citizenship and democracy during the colonial/postcolonial transition. It examines how processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years contributed to demands and concerns and offers a broadened and imaginative outlook on India’s partition. Drawing upon a novel body of archival research, the book ultimately suggests Pakistan might also be considered as just one paradigmatic example of a range of coterminous calls for regional autonomy and statehood, informed by a majoritarian democratic logic that had an extensive contemporary circulation. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of South Asian history in general and the Partition in particular as well as to those interested in British colonialism and postcolonial studies.
    • Citizenship, Reservations and the Regional Alternative in the All-India Services, ca. 1928–1950

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-04-08)
      This paper unearths an alternative paradigm through which to consider the discussions and debates between members of the Indian public, government bureaucrats and Congress Party politicians about the rights and interests of Indian citizens both before and immediately after India's Independence in 1947. It argues that much of the recent historical work on citizenship during this period has been preoccupied with issues of nationality and religious community as a result of the fallout from Partition. However, the demands and deliberations over the introduction of provincial forms of affirmative action in the all-India services at this time are indicative of a different narrative. First, many provincial representations of ‘minority’ rights often took into account differences of caste and language instead. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the term minority was employed not only to describe demographic minority status, but also to define under-represented groups in the all-India services. In doing so, these different provincial policies prioritised particular local rights to representation, in which citizenship was expressed through a regional idiom.
    • 'Civis Indianus Sum': ambedkar on democracy and territory during linguistic reorganisation (and partition).

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press., 2019-08-13)
      This article considers Ambedkar’s ideas about the implementation of democracy in India, in the context of the linguistic reorganisation of provincial administrative boundaries. In doing so, it looks to emphasise the importance of territorial configurations to Dalit politics during this period, and in particular the consequences of ‘provincialisation’, which has received little attention within the existing literature. Rethinking space by redrawing administrative territory provided Ambedkar with one potential avenue through which to escape the strictures of Dalits’ minority status. In this vision, linguistic reorganisation (and partition) were harbingers of greater democratisation and potential palliatives to the threat of Hindu majority rule at the centre. In turn, however, Ambedkar simultaneously came to perceive the creation of these new administrative spaces as marking a new form of provincial majoritarianism, despite his best efforts to form alliances with those making such demands. In this sense, the article also seeks to address some of the shared processes behind linguistic reorganisation and partition, as two related forms of territorial redrawing. In the face of these demands, and the failures of both commensuration and coalition politics, Ambedkar turned to the idea of separate settlements for Dalits, whereby they might themselves come to constitute a majority. Whilst such a novel attempt at separation and resettlement was not ultimately realised, its emergence within Ambedkar’s thought at this time points towards its significance in any history of caste and untouchability in twentieth-century South Asia.
    • Clientelism, community and collaboration: loyalism in nineteenth-century colonial India.

      Godsmark, Oliver; Gould, William; Loughborough University; University of Leeds (Boydell and Brewer, 2014-05)
      Loyalism in Britain and Ireland, which was once seen as a crude reaction against radicalism or nationalism, stimulated by the elite and blindly followed by plebeians, has recently been shown by historians to have been, on the contrary, a politically multi-faceted, socially enabling phenomenon which did much to shape identity in the British Isles. This book takes further this revised picture by considering loyalism in the wider British World. It considers the overall nature of loyalism, exploring its development in England, Ireland and Scotland, and goes on to examine its manifestation in a range of British colonies and former colonies, including the United States, Canada, India, Australia and New Zealand. It shows that whilst eighteenth-century Anglo-centric loyalism had a core of common ideological assumptions, associational structures and ritual behaviour, loyalism manifested itself differently in different territories. This divergence is explored through a discussion of the role of loyal associations and military institutions, loyalism's cultural and ritual dimensions and its key role in the formation of political identities. Chronologically, the book covers a pivotal period, comprehending the American and French Revolutions, the 1798 Irish rebellion and Irish Union, the Canadian rebellions of 1837, and Fenianism and Home Rule campaigns throughout the British World.
    • The compass of possibilities: re-mapping the suburbs of Los Angeles in the writings of D.J. Waldie

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (European Journal of American Studies, 2011-10)
      This article uses the works of the writer, memoirist, and Lakewood, California public official, D. J. Waldie to deepen our concept of “region” and to re-assess many of the stereotypical discourses associated with the American suburbs. In the fashionable parlance of Mike Davis’ City of Quartz, Los Angeles has become defined by its “suburban badlands”; however, Waldie‘s work takes a different view in which his suburban home in LA is the focus for a more complex, multi-faceted approach to post-war suburbia. Typified by his re-assessment of the suburban grid as a “compass of possibilities,” his writings encourage a more nuanced and layered view of the communities and cultures fostered in such places. His key work Holy Land is an argument about why a disregarded place, an ordinary place like suburbia, can in fact contain qualities of life that are profound and reassuring. Through examining his work in its cultural and theoretical context this article looks below the expected “grid” of suburbia to demonstrate the rich life beyond its apparent anonymity.
    • Conflict, identity and the role of the internet: the use of the internet by the Serbian intelligentsia in the 1999 conflict over Kosovo

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (Delta State University, 2010-04)
      This article investigates the role of the nature of electronic communications in what has been recognised as being the first Internet war. It builds upon Regis Debray's theory on the three stages of the intellectual (university, print media and television) by advocating that the Internet has become the fourth stage for the intellectual in speaking truth to power (Said).
    • Contexts, identities and consumption: Britain 1688-1815

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Continuum, 2009)
    • Creating Suburbia: the gardenesque, place, association and the rustic tradition; the landscape gardening philosophy and practices of Edward Kemp (1817–91)

      Elliott, Paul; University of Derby (The Gardens Trust, 2018-11-26)
      This paper focuses on the intellectual context for Edward Kemp’s work, his books and their impact, by employing various examples from specific commissions with which he was engaged, including Grosvenor Park, Chester. It evaluates the design influences that informed his approach to landscape gardening and assesses the extent to which his published output and public and private commissions influenced the philosophy and practices of landscape gardening from the late 1840s to the end of his active career.
    • Creativity, space and performance

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Routledge, 2010)
      Creativity appeals because it is vital. I examine ideas about the dynamics of creativity that embed it in everyday living; in things people do, how they get by, feel a sense of wonder and significance, and make or find becoming in their lives, personally and inter-subjectively. Creativity in everyday lief is a dynamic through which people live.
    • Cultural and historical geographies of the arboretum

      Elliott, Paul; Watkins, Charles; Daniels, Stephen; University of Derby; university of Nottingham (Garden History Society (Gardens Trust), 2007)
      Arboretums were innovative and important developments in British, and ultimately global, landscape gardening during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Inspired by British and European traditions of landscape gardening, horticulture, agricultural improvement and botany, they were imbued with symbolism and meaning according to the circumstances of their creation, character and usage. For some nineteenth-century landscape gardeners and horticulturists, they offered global excursions in microcosm providing rational recreation, aesthetic enjoyment and botanical experimentation. Their systematic planting promoted an image of rational, objective science and appropriate behavioural responses, helping to differentiate and shape Victorian middle-class identity. However, the complex relationships between designs, management, botanical displays, organic agencies and consumption ensured contested and contingent responses and appropriations.
    • Delivering drama: drama in education practitioner Ava Hunt on what it's like to work in a war-torn region

      Hunt, Ava (Arts Industry, 2008-10-24)
      An account of the challenges of introducing drama skills to English teachers in Sri Lanka, against complex social issues of a war torn country.
    • The Derby Philosophers: Science and Culture in British Urban Society, 1700-1850

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (Manchester University Press, 2009)
      The Derby Philosophers focuses upon the activities of a group of Midland intellectuals that included the evolutionist and physician Erasmus Darwin, Rev. Thomas Gisborne the evangelical philosopher and poet, Robert Bage the novelist, Charles Sylvester the chemist and engineer, William George and his son Herbert Spencer, the internationally renowned evolutionist philosopher who coined the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’, and members of the Wedgwood and Strutt families. The book explores how, inspired by science and through educational activities, publications and institutions including the famous Derbyshire General Infirmary (1810) and Derby Arboretum (1840), the Derby philosophers strove to promote social, political and urban improvements with national and international consequences. Much more than a parochial history of one intellectual group or town, this book examines science, politics and culture during one of the most turbulent periods of British history, an age of political and industrial revolutions in which the Derby philosophers were closely involved.