• “I smoked them out”: Perspectives on the emergence of folk opera or ‘musical plays’ in Uganda.

      Kasule, Sam; University of Derby (Boydell and Brewer, 2020-11-20)
      Music is often cited as a central artistic mode in African theatre and performance practices. However, little attention has been paid to music theatre on the continent in general, and to opera in particular, with the exceptions of a few noted genres, such as Concert Party or the Yoruba "folk opera" of the 1960s, and the emerging research on opera culture in South Africa. This volume of African Theatre highlights the diversity across the continent from a variety of perspectives - including those of genre, media, and historiography. Above all, it raises questions and encourages debate: What does "opera" mean in African and African diasporic contexts? What are its practices and legacies - colonial, postcolonial and decolonial; what is its relation to the intersectionalities of race and class? How do opera and music theatre reflect, change or obscure social, political and economic realities? How are they connected to educational and cultural institutions, and non-profit organisations? And why is opera contradictorily, at various times, perceived as both "grand" and "elitist, "folk" and "quotidian", "Eurocentric" and "indigenous"? Contributors also address aesthetic transformation processes, the porousness of genre boundaries and the role of space and place, with examples ranging from Egypt to South Africa, from Uganda to West Africa and the USA. The playscript in this volume is We Take Care of Our Own by Zainabu Jallo GUEST EDITORS: Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo & Hilde Roos Series Editors: Yvette Hutchison, Reader, Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, University of Warwick; Chukwuma Okoye, Reader in African Theatre & Performance University of Ibadan; Jane Plastow, Professor of African Theatre, University of Leeds.
    • Creating community resilience: theatre for young audiences and the mental health crisis

      Hunt, Ava; Braverman, Danny; University of Derby; Goldsmiths University (National Drama Publications, 2020-04)
      The authors explore the assertion that TYA in schools can play a significant role in addressing the mental health crisis affecting young people in the UK, with implications globally. There is growing consensus that the current mental health crisis is impacting on attainment. However, government remains reluctant to recognise the value of arts education in schools, as narrow instrumentalism continues to feed the ‘exam factory’. This paper proposes not just a reinvigoration of professional TYA in schools, but also a framework to evaluate ‘quality’. Braverman’s Dialogue Across Difference, inspired by the work of Jill Dolan (2008)/Victor Turner (2011), uses the exemplar of Theatre Centre UK. David Johnston’s (Artistic Director 1977-1986), leadership is placed within this framework to explore Hunt’s practice-as-research project Journeys of Destiny (2019). The authors reframe the notion of ‘resilience’ as a community-social paradigm in contrast to an individualistic-medical model.
    • East African theatres and performances

      Kasule, Samuel; Osita, Okagbue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020)
      The focus of the book is primarily performance and its dialectical relationship with culture and society in East African theatre practices and traditions. A secondary interest pursued in the book is a broader exploration and articulation of the concept of performance, much in the same way that Schechner (2002: 34) proposes it to encompass a myriad of human activities that are perceived to be “restored behaviour” or “twice behaved behaviours”. The book explores the relationship between dance, dialogue, music, recitation, song, and the theatrical performance as inscribed in various indigenous concepts. It further centres on the insights into the nature of theatre and/or performance as a cultural practice and an art form, and theatre’s relationship to culture and identity. It examines indigenous performance processes and structures that include staging techniques, proxemic principles, design and its realisation, performer-spectator relationship, the non-professionalism of the different categories of performers and theatre makers in East Africa. The study takes account of the mix of representational and presentational modes of performance, aligned to predominantly non-script-based theatre practices, which sharply contrast with the often highly stylized forms of many Asian performance traditions as well as the often realistic modes of performance of some other non-African traditions. By examining both the indigenous performance forms and practices and the ways in which their work is conceptualized, developed, and staged, this study demonstrates the potential influence of African thought and aesthetics on aspects of global contemporary theatre and performance.
    • Shaping public opinion in a time of colonial conflict: media allegations of the use of torture by the French army in the first Vietnam war

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (2019-10)
      This article is set against the broader background of editorial comment and eye-witness reportage in the French printed media on France's war of decolonisation in Indochina and Algeria between 1946 and 1962. It focuses on one particular aspect of this period, namely the allegations of misconduct by the French army during this conflict, which is also known as the First Vietnam War (1946 - 1954) as part of the Vietnamese liberation struggle against French colonial mastery. At the heart of this analysis lies the way in which the conflict was represented in three key journals in France at the time. The journals, 'Les Temps modernes', 'Temoignage Chretien' and 'Esprit', all still publishing, were vociferous in their criticism of the general conduct of the war, whilst 'Les Temps modernes' and 'Temoignage Chretien' laid particular emphasis on the use of repressive measures by members of the French Expeditionary Forces against the indigenous population of Vietnam, before 1950.
    • 'Civis Indianus Sum': ambedkar on democracy and territory during linguistic reorganisation (and partition).

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press., 2019-08-13)
      This article considers Ambedkar’s ideas about the implementation of democracy in India, in the context of the linguistic reorganisation of provincial administrative boundaries. In doing so, it looks to emphasise the importance of territorial configurations to Dalit politics during this period, and in particular the consequences of ‘provincialisation’, which has received little attention within the existing literature. Rethinking space by redrawing administrative territory provided Ambedkar with one potential avenue through which to escape the strictures of Dalits’ minority status. In this vision, linguistic reorganisation (and partition) were harbingers of greater democratisation and potential palliatives to the threat of Hindu majority rule at the centre. In turn, however, Ambedkar simultaneously came to perceive the creation of these new administrative spaces as marking a new form of provincial majoritarianism, despite his best efforts to form alliances with those making such demands. In this sense, the article also seeks to address some of the shared processes behind linguistic reorganisation and partition, as two related forms of territorial redrawing. In the face of these demands, and the failures of both commensuration and coalition politics, Ambedkar turned to the idea of separate settlements for Dalits, whereby they might themselves come to constitute a majority. Whilst such a novel attempt at separation and resettlement was not ultimately realised, its emergence within Ambedkar’s thought at this time points towards its significance in any history of caste and untouchability in twentieth-century South Asia.
    • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

      Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
      This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
    • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
      This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
    • What west? Worlding the western in Hernan Diaz's in the distance

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2019)
      The essay examines Hernan Diaz's novel In the Distance as an example of "worlding", showing how it interrupts conventions of the western to explore a postexceptionalist view of the West as a space of difference in which worlds collide.
    • Creating Suburbia: the gardenesque, place, association and the rustic tradition; the landscape gardening philosophy and practices of Edward Kemp (1817–91)

      Elliott, Paul; University of Derby (The Gardens Trust, 2018-11-26)
      This paper focuses on the intellectual context for Edward Kemp’s work, his books and their impact, by employing various examples from specific commissions with which he was engaged, including Grosvenor Park, Chester. It evaluates the design influences that informed his approach to landscape gardening and assesses the extent to which his published output and public and private commissions influenced the philosophy and practices of landscape gardening from the late 1840s to the end of his active career.
    • A New Gentleness: Effective Ficto-Regionality

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-11-01)
      Using affective critical regionality to enable a re-valuing of the local as a powerful means to appreciate the everyday and the overlooked as vital elements within a more inclusive understanding of how we live.
    • Walukagga the Black Smith

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Wavah Books Ltd, 2018-08)
      Walukagga (The Blacksmith) is the story of the Baganda in Uganda and their Chief whose tyrannical rule is brought to an end by a madman's wisdom. the story restores the power into the hands of the people. In the play, Walukagga challenges the growing threat of institutionalised extortion.
    • "The Seam of Something Else Unnamed": Sebastian Barry's Days Without End

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-07-21)
      This essay examines Sebastian Barry's Days Without End as a novel that examines and critiques conventions of the American West through its consideration of alternative communities of sexuality. Using theoretical frames drawn from performativity studies, it explores how terrible prejudices of race, gender and sexuality can be challenged.
    • The Great War and British identity

      Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
      In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.
    • “Another story for another time": The many-strandedness of a Jewish woman's storytelling tradition

      Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Wayne State University Press, 2018-05-20)
      This article is a cursory outline description of the Marks-Khymberg family tradition of Anglo-Dutch Jewish oral narrative, in its context, culminating in a preliminary analysis of one sub-cycle of tales drawn from the family repertoire.
    • Thirteenth annual international academic conference on European Integration Europe and the Balkans

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, 2018-05-17)
      How is the Berlin Process helping the Balkan States in their aspirations towards full European Union integration? What lessons can successful East European EU member states give to the six aspirant Western Balkan states; and , how can we use perichoresis in reconsidering Balkanism? These are just some of the questions addressed in this volume, which also includes chapters on the growth of Russian soft power in the Balkans, the impact of the emigration of skilled workers from the Balkans on the regional economy and aspirations for EU integration, and how over-long periods of transition have fed into Euro-scepticism.
    • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
      This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.
    • Citizenship, community and democracy in India: from Bombay to Maharashtra, c. 1930 to 1960.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Routledge, 2018-02-05)
      This book delivers ground-breaking perspectives upon nascent conceptions and workings of citizenship and democracy during the colonial/postcolonial transition. It examines how processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years contributed to demands and concerns and offers a broadened and imaginative outlook on India’s partition. Drawing upon a novel body of archival research, the book ultimately suggests Pakistan might also be considered as just one paradigmatic example of a range of coterminous calls for regional autonomy and statehood, informed by a majoritarian democratic logic that had an extensive contemporary circulation. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of South Asian history in general and the Partition in particular as well as to those interested in British colonialism and postcolonial studies.
    • Under the Western Sky: Essays on the Fiction and Music of Willy Vlautin

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nevada Press, 2018)
      The first original collection of essays examining the work of Willy Vlautin as both musician and novelist, placing it within the contexts of western studies and wider theoretical frames such as critical regionalism, affect theory and cultural studies.
    • Lived places of anarchy: Colin Ward’s social anarchy in action

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)
    • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

      Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
      The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.