• East African theatres and performances

      Kasule, Samuel; Osita, Okagbue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020)
      The focus of the book is primarily performance and its dialectical relationship with culture and society in East African theatre practices and traditions. A secondary interest pursued in the book is a broader exploration and articulation of the concept of performance, much in the same way that Schechner (2002: 34) proposes it to encompass a myriad of human activities that are perceived to be “restored behaviour” or “twice behaved behaviours”. The book explores the relationship between dance, dialogue, music, recitation, song, and the theatrical performance as inscribed in various indigenous concepts. It further centres on the insights into the nature of theatre and/or performance as a cultural practice and an art form, and theatre’s relationship to culture and identity. It examines indigenous performance processes and structures that include staging techniques, proxemic principles, design and its realisation, performer-spectator relationship, the non-professionalism of the different categories of performers and theatre makers in East Africa. The study takes account of the mix of representational and presentational modes of performance, aligned to predominantly non-script-based theatre practices, which sharply contrast with the often highly stylized forms of many Asian performance traditions as well as the often realistic modes of performance of some other non-African traditions. By examining both the indigenous performance forms and practices and the ways in which their work is conceptualized, developed, and staged, this study demonstrates the potential influence of African thought and aesthetics on aspects of global contemporary theatre and performance.
    • The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

      McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J.; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2019-11-06)
      Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
    • 'Civis Indianus Sum': ambedkar on democracy and territory during linguistic reorganisation (and partition).

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press., 2019-08-13)
      This article considers Ambedkar’s ideas about the implementation of democracy in India, in the context of the linguistic reorganisation of provincial administrative boundaries. In doing so, it looks to emphasise the importance of territorial configurations to Dalit politics during this period, and in particular the consequences of ‘provincialisation’, which has received little attention within the existing literature. Rethinking space by redrawing administrative territory provided Ambedkar with one potential avenue through which to escape the strictures of Dalits’ minority status. In this vision, linguistic reorganisation (and partition) were harbingers of greater democratisation and potential palliatives to the threat of Hindu majority rule at the centre. In turn, however, Ambedkar simultaneously came to perceive the creation of these new administrative spaces as marking a new form of provincial majoritarianism, despite his best efforts to form alliances with those making such demands. In this sense, the article also seeks to address some of the shared processes behind linguistic reorganisation and partition, as two related forms of territorial redrawing. In the face of these demands, and the failures of both commensuration and coalition politics, Ambedkar turned to the idea of separate settlements for Dalits, whereby they might themselves come to constitute a majority. Whilst such a novel attempt at separation and resettlement was not ultimately realised, its emergence within Ambedkar’s thought at this time points towards its significance in any history of caste and untouchability in twentieth-century South Asia.
    • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

      Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
      This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
    • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
      This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
    • Creating Suburbia: the gardenesque, place, association and the rustic tradition; the landscape gardening philosophy and practices of Edward Kemp (1817–91)

      Elliott, Paul; University of Derby (The Gardens Trust, 2018-11-26)
      This paper focuses on the intellectual context for Edward Kemp’s work, his books and their impact, by employing various examples from specific commissions with which he was engaged, including Grosvenor Park, Chester. It evaluates the design influences that informed his approach to landscape gardening and assesses the extent to which his published output and public and private commissions influenced the philosophy and practices of landscape gardening from the late 1840s to the end of his active career.
    • A New Gentleness: Effective Ficto-Regionality

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-11-01)
      Using affective critical regionality to enable a re-valuing of the local as a powerful means to appreciate the everyday and the overlooked as vital elements within a more inclusive understanding of how we live.
    • Walukagga the Black Smith

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Wavah Books Ltd, 2018-08)
      Walukagga (The Blacksmith) is the story of the Baganda in Uganda and their Chief whose tyrannical rule is brought to an end by a madman's wisdom. the story restores the power into the hands of the people. In the play, Walukagga challenges the growing threat of institutionalised extortion.
    • "The Seam of Something Else Unnamed": Sebastian Barry's Days Without End

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-07-21)
      This essay examines Sebastian Barry's Days Without End as a novel that examines and critiques conventions of the American West through its consideration of alternative communities of sexuality. Using theoretical frames drawn from performativity studies, it explores how terrible prejudices of race, gender and sexuality can be challenged.
    • The Great War and British identity

      Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
      In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.
    • “Another story for another time": The many-strandedness of a Jewish woman's storytelling tradition

      Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Wayne State University Press, 2018-05-20)
      This article is a cursory outline description of the Marks-Khymberg family tradition of Anglo-Dutch Jewish oral narrative, in its context, culminating in a preliminary analysis of one sub-cycle of tales drawn from the family repertoire.
    • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
      This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.
    • Citizenship, community and democracy in India: from Bombay to Maharashtra, c. 1930 to 1960.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Routledge, 2018-02-05)
      This book delivers ground-breaking perspectives upon nascent conceptions and workings of citizenship and democracy during the colonial/postcolonial transition. It examines how processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years contributed to demands and concerns and offers a broadened and imaginative outlook on India’s partition. Drawing upon a novel body of archival research, the book ultimately suggests Pakistan might also be considered as just one paradigmatic example of a range of coterminous calls for regional autonomy and statehood, informed by a majoritarian democratic logic that had an extensive contemporary circulation. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of South Asian history in general and the Partition in particular as well as to those interested in British colonialism and postcolonial studies.
    • Under the Western Sky: Essays on the Fiction and Music of Willy Vlautin

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nevada Press, 2018)
      The first original collection of essays examining the work of Willy Vlautin as both musician and novelist, placing it within the contexts of western studies and wider theoretical frames such as critical regionalism, affect theory and cultural studies.
    • Lived places of anarchy: Colin Ward’s social anarchy in action

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)
    • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

      Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
      The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.
    • Space, living, atmospheres, affectivities

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017-10)
    • The question of space interrogating the spatial turn between disciplines

      Crouch, David; Nieuwenhuis, Marijn; Crouch, David; University of Derby (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017-10)
      The spatial turn has been deeply influential across the humanities and social sciences for several decades. Yet despite this long term influence most volumes focus mainly on geography and tend to take a Eurocentric approach to the topic. The Question of Space takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding how the spatial turn has affected a wide range of disciplines. By connecting developments across radically different fields the volume bridges the very borders that separate the academic space. From new geographies through performance, using the internet, politics and the arts, the distinctive chapters undertake conversations that often surprisingly converge in approach, questions and insights. Together the chapters transcend longstanding disciplinary boundaries to build a constructive dialogue around the question of space.
    • Theory on theory.

      Sims, Robin; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2017-07-19)
      Key debates in the domain of ‘Theory on Theory’ have this year focused upon the legacies of the theorists grouped together under the name ‘poststructuralism’, often drawing on material made available in recent decades by Barthes, Foucault and Deleuze which adds new facets to critical understanding of their work. Reflecting on their contributions, it appears that individual theorists can illuminate or extend each other’s oeuvres: Foucault in particular has attracted considerable attention in this vein in 2016, with books appearing which respectively place his ideas alongside those of Marx, Derrida and Deleuze. His lectures on ‘governmentality’, meanwhile, have prompted some to claim that his account of neoliberalism therein demonstrated a ‘quiet appreciation’ of it (Peter Fleming, The Mythology of Work: How Capitalism Persists Despite Itself (Pluto Press [2015]), p. 45). Turning to Barthes, we find re-evaluations...
    • The IMF and a new global politics of inequality?

      Nunn, Alex; White, Paul; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University (Australian Political Economy Movement, 2017-01)
      This paper addresses a simple, and largely empirical, research question: is the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) recent high level commitment to reducing inequality translated into concrete action in its dealings with member states? Addressing this research question is significant in several respects. First, the high level rhetorical commitment to reduce inequality might be seen as paradoxical because the IMF, alongside other institutions of global economic management, has long been criticised for its role in promoting economic reform in member countries, partly on the basis that this increases inequality (Peet et al. 2009; Kentikelenis et al. 2016: 550-1). It is therefore important to assess the extent to which recent pronouncements on inequality by the Fund suggest a change in emphasis or a genuine institutional commitment. Second, addressing the question contributes to a contemporary academic literature on more technical aspects of how we should understand and interpret IMF policy advice and conditionality. This literature currently focusses on a range of aspects of IMF policy advice, but does not address the recent interest of the Fund in inequality. The paper addresses this lacuna.