• The Europe of tomorrow: creative, digital, integrated

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College Skopje, 2014-05-15)
      How can investment in the cultural and creative sectors sustain development and social cohesion? How can ICTs contribute to a growth in productivity, jobs and competitiveness, whilst improving social inclusion and helping to reduce the negative impact on the environment? Can regional and cross-border co-operation foster better integration and good neighbourhood relations? This said, is Europe lurching out of economic crisis into a new Cold War, given the wider implications of the Ukrainian crisis to European security? In the wake of the European financial crisis, how should we deal with the political and social dangers to European integration of a dramatic growth in youth employment and the rise of right wig extremism? How can we foster a European education? These are some of the important questions addressed in this book which seeks to critically address the opportunities for building a stronger European Union - one that relies on creativity, innovation and digital technologies whilst strengthening its basic values of freedom and society.
    • Creating community resilience: theatre for young audiences and the mental health crisis

      Hunt, Ava; Braverman, Danny; University of Derby; Goldsmiths University (National Drama Publications, 2020-04)
      The authors explore the assertion that TYA in schools can play a significant role in addressing the mental health crisis affecting young people in the UK, with implications globally. There is growing consensus that the current mental health crisis is impacting on attainment. However, government remains reluctant to recognise the value of arts education in schools, as narrow instrumentalism continues to feed the ‘exam factory’. This paper proposes not just a reinvigoration of professional TYA in schools, but also a framework to evaluate ‘quality’. Braverman’s Dialogue Across Difference, inspired by the work of Jill Dolan (2008)/Victor Turner (2011), uses the exemplar of Theatre Centre UK. David Johnston’s (Artistic Director 1977-1986), leadership is placed within this framework to explore Hunt’s practice-as-research project Journeys of Destiny (2019). The authors reframe the notion of ‘resilience’ as a community-social paradigm in contrast to an individualistic-medical model.
    • Shaping public opinion in a time of colonial conflict: media allegations of the use of torture by the French army in the first Vietnam war

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (2019-10)
      This article is set against the broader background of editorial comment and eye-witness reportage in the French printed media on France's war of decolonisation in Indochina and Algeria between 1946 and 1962. It focuses on one particular aspect of this period, namely the allegations of misconduct by the French army during this conflict, which is also known as the First Vietnam War (1946 - 1954) as part of the Vietnamese liberation struggle against French colonial mastery. At the heart of this analysis lies the way in which the conflict was represented in three key journals in France at the time. The journals, 'Les Temps modernes', 'Temoignage Chretien' and 'Esprit', all still publishing, were vociferous in their criticism of the general conduct of the war, whilst 'Les Temps modernes' and 'Temoignage Chretien' laid particular emphasis on the use of repressive measures by members of the French Expeditionary Forces against the indigenous population of Vietnam, before 1950.
    • Thirteenth annual international academic conference on European Integration Europe and the Balkans

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, 2018-05-17)
      How is the Berlin Process helping the Balkan States in their aspirations towards full European Union integration? What lessons can successful East European EU member states give to the six aspirant Western Balkan states; and , how can we use perichoresis in reconsidering Balkanism? These are just some of the questions addressed in this volume, which also includes chapters on the growth of Russian soft power in the Balkans, the impact of the emigration of skilled workers from the Balkans on the regional economy and aspirations for EU integration, and how over-long periods of transition have fed into Euro-scepticism.
    • What west? Worlding the western in Hernan Diaz's in the distance

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2019)
      The essay examines Hernan Diaz's novel In the Distance as an example of "worlding", showing how it interrupts conventions of the western to explore a postexceptionalist view of the West as a space of difference in which worlds collide.
    • “I smoked them out”: Perspectives on the emergence of folk opera or ‘musical plays’ in Uganda.

      Kasule, Sam; University of Derby (Boydell and Brewer, 2020-11-20)
      Music is often cited as a central artistic mode in African theatre and performance practices. However, little attention has been paid to music theatre on the continent in general, and to opera in particular, with the exceptions of a few noted genres, such as Concert Party or the Yoruba "folk opera" of the 1960s, and the emerging research on opera culture in South Africa. This volume of African Theatre highlights the diversity across the continent from a variety of perspectives - including those of genre, media, and historiography. Above all, it raises questions and encourages debate: What does "opera" mean in African and African diasporic contexts? What are its practices and legacies - colonial, postcolonial and decolonial; what is its relation to the intersectionalities of race and class? How do opera and music theatre reflect, change or obscure social, political and economic realities? How are they connected to educational and cultural institutions, and non-profit organisations? And why is opera contradictorily, at various times, perceived as both "grand" and "elitist, "folk" and "quotidian", "Eurocentric" and "indigenous"? Contributors also address aesthetic transformation processes, the porousness of genre boundaries and the role of space and place, with examples ranging from Egypt to South Africa, from Uganda to West Africa and the USA. The playscript in this volume is We Take Care of Our Own by Zainabu Jallo GUEST EDITORS: Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo & Hilde Roos Series Editors: Yvette Hutchison, Reader, Department of Theatre & Performance Studies, University of Warwick; Chukwuma Okoye, Reader in African Theatre & Performance University of Ibadan; Jane Plastow, Professor of African Theatre, University of Leeds.
    • Informant disavowal and the interpretation of storytelling revival

      Heywood, Simon; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2004)
      The scholarship of traditional arts revivals is often ironic. Revivalists’ activity has been understood as a rational, politically nostalgic, and symbolic re-enactment of a fictional past. In this, scholars have underestimated the significance of disavowal; that is, informants’ neutral or negative responses to analytical methods and conclusions. Interviews with English storytelling revivalists reveal a coherent and significant consensus of disavowal, showing their primary concern to be not with nostalgic self-rationalisation, but with basic practical issues of artistic and sociable interaction. Storytelling revival involves nostalgic displays that are actually fragmentary, superficial, and subordinate to practical concerns. This suggests that revivalists are seeking not to symbolise an imagined past for political purposes, but to familiarise recently appropriated performance genres for artistic purposes. This conclusion is hypothetically applicable to the uses of nostalgic rationalisation within other revival movements.
    • The Great War and British identity

      Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
      In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.
    • “Another story for another time": The many-strandedness of a Jewish woman's storytelling tradition

      Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Wayne State University Press, 2018-05-20)
      This article is a cursory outline description of the Marks-Khymberg family tradition of Anglo-Dutch Jewish oral narrative, in its context, culminating in a preliminary analysis of one sub-cycle of tales drawn from the family repertoire.
    • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

      Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
      The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.
    • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
      This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.
    • Archbishop Thomson's visitation returns for the diocese of York, 1865

      Larsen, Ruth M.; Royle, Edward; University of York (Borthwick Institute, 2006)
      In 1865 archbishop William Thomson conducted his first visitation of his diocese - an opportunity for him to get to know his diocese and to find out what the challenges for his episcopate were. In advance of his tour, the clergy and churchwardens of the diocese were sent a list of questions to answer about their churches and the parishes they served. This provided an opportunity for local people to have their say about their parishes. Questions were asked about the clergy who served the parish, about where they lived, and what other churches they served. There were also questions about the frequency of services, how often a sermon was preached, how often there were communion services and what proportion of the parish came to church. Thomson also asked a number of questions about education in the parish, with specific enquiries about how many children and adults attended schools, both daily and Sunday schools. The 654 responses to these questions from the parish clergy, known as visitation returns, form the basis of this edition. These returns are the first set to have survived for a visitation of York diocese since archbishop Drummond's visitation of 1764 (also published by the Borthwick). In Drummond's returns we caught the mid 18th century church on the eve of great social changes. In Thomson's returns we get a chance to see the Anglican church in the early morning of its response to these continuing challenges. Royle and Larsen introduce the returns with a discussion of the nature of this visitation and explore what they can tell us about Yorkshire parish life between the mid 18th century and the 19th century. There is a useful appendix giving data about each parish, the size of population, the patron of the church, the value of the living and the existence of parsonage houses.
    • East African theatres and performances

      Kasule, Samuel; Osita, Okagbue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020)
      The focus of the book is primarily performance and its dialectical relationship with culture and society in East African theatre practices and traditions. A secondary interest pursued in the book is a broader exploration and articulation of the concept of performance, much in the same way that Schechner (2002: 34) proposes it to encompass a myriad of human activities that are perceived to be “restored behaviour” or “twice behaved behaviours”. The book explores the relationship between dance, dialogue, music, recitation, song, and the theatrical performance as inscribed in various indigenous concepts. It further centres on the insights into the nature of theatre and/or performance as a cultural practice and an art form, and theatre’s relationship to culture and identity. It examines indigenous performance processes and structures that include staging techniques, proxemic principles, design and its realisation, performer-spectator relationship, the non-professionalism of the different categories of performers and theatre makers in East Africa. The study takes account of the mix of representational and presentational modes of performance, aligned to predominantly non-script-based theatre practices, which sharply contrast with the often highly stylized forms of many Asian performance traditions as well as the often realistic modes of performance of some other non-African traditions. By examining both the indigenous performance forms and practices and the ways in which their work is conceptualized, developed, and staged, this study demonstrates the potential influence of African thought and aesthetics on aspects of global contemporary theatre and performance.
    • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

      Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
      This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
    • Politics, modernism, and Bob Dylan's search for a Usable Past in the Rolling Thunder Revue

      David Holloway; University of Derby (Symbiosis, 2016-04)
      This essay considers how Bob Dylan's use of modernist style, from Cubism to Brecht's "Epic Theatre", informs his 1975 tour, The Rolling Thunder Revue.
    • Cultural and historical geographies of the arboretum

      Elliott, Paul; Watkins, Charles; Daniels, Stephen; University of Derby; university of Nottingham (Garden History Society (Gardens Trust), 2007)
      Arboretums were innovative and important developments in British, and ultimately global, landscape gardening during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Inspired by British and European traditions of landscape gardening, horticulture, agricultural improvement and botany, they were imbued with symbolism and meaning according to the circumstances of their creation, character and usage. For some nineteenth-century landscape gardeners and horticulturists, they offered global excursions in microcosm providing rational recreation, aesthetic enjoyment and botanical experimentation. Their systematic planting promoted an image of rational, objective science and appropriate behavioural responses, helping to differentiate and shape Victorian middle-class identity. However, the complex relationships between designs, management, botanical displays, organic agencies and consumption ensured contested and contingent responses and appropriations.
    • 'An Asseblage of Habits' : D.J. Waldie and Neil Campbell - A Suburban Conversation

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (2011)
      I edited this special edition on western suburbia, selected the images and interviewed the writer D.J. Waldie for the journal.
    • The British Arboretum: Trees, Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (Pickering and Chatto, 2011)
      This study explores the science and culture of nineteenth-century British arboretums, or tree collections. The development of arboretums was fostered by a variety of factors, each of which is explored in detail: global trade and exploration, the popularity of collecting, the significance to the British economy and society, developments in Enlightenment science, changes in landscape gardening aesthetics and agricultural and horticultural improvement.Arboretums were idealized as microcosms of nature, miniature encapsulations of the globe and as living museums. This book critically examines different kinds of arboretum in order to understand the changing practical, scientific, aesthetic and pedagogical principles that underpinned their design, display and the way in which they were viewed. It is the first study of its kind and fills a gap in the literature on Victorian science and culture.
    • The Derby Philosophers: Science and Culture in British Urban Society, 1700-1850

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (Manchester University Press, 2009)
      The Derby Philosophers focuses upon the activities of a group of Midland intellectuals that included the evolutionist and physician Erasmus Darwin, Rev. Thomas Gisborne the evangelical philosopher and poet, Robert Bage the novelist, Charles Sylvester the chemist and engineer, William George and his son Herbert Spencer, the internationally renowned evolutionist philosopher who coined the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’, and members of the Wedgwood and Strutt families. The book explores how, inspired by science and through educational activities, publications and institutions including the famous Derbyshire General Infirmary (1810) and Derby Arboretum (1840), the Derby philosophers strove to promote social, political and urban improvements with national and international consequences. Much more than a parochial history of one intellectual group or town, this book examines science, politics and culture during one of the most turbulent periods of British history, an age of political and industrial revolutions in which the Derby philosophers were closely involved.
    • Enlightenment, Modernity and Science: Geographies of Scientific Culture and Improvement in Georgian England

      Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (I. B. Tauris, 2010)
      Scientific culture was one of the defining characteristics of the English Enlightenment. The latest discoveries were debated in homes, institutions and towns around the country. But how did the dissemination of scientific knowledge vary with geographical location? What were the differing influences in town and country and from region to region? Enlightenment, Modernity and Science provides the first full length study of the geographies of Georgian scientific culture in England. The author takes the reader on a tour of the principal arenas in which scientific ideas were disseminated, including home, town and countryside, to show how cultures of science and knowledge varied across the Georgian landscape. Taking in key figures such as Erasmus Darwin, Abraham Bennett, and Joseph Priestley along the way, it is a work that sheds important light on the complex geographies of Georgian English scientific culture.