• Marion Adnams: A singular woman

      Forde, Teresa; Wood, Val; Bamford, Lucy; University of Derby; Derby Museums and Art Gallery (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 02/12/2017)
      Retrospective of Marion Adnams' work: Marion Elizabeth Adnams was born in Derby in 1898 where she remained, for the most part, until her death, aged ninety-six. During the course of her long life, she forged a reputation as a painter of deeply distinctive and dream-like visions inspired by the Surrealist movement. Adnams exhibited almost continuously in London and regional art galleries from the late 1930s and examples of her work can be found in many public collections, alongside that of her friends and contemporaries Evelyn Gibbs and Eileen Agar. Despite this, her work is largely forgotten today. This important exhibition brings together the full and diverse range of her art for the first time in almost fifty years in a bid to recapture the legacy of this most remarkable artist. This exhibition was made possible with support from Art Fund. This exhibition was curated in partnership with Val Wood, independent researcher, and Teresa Forde, Senior Lecturer in Film and Media at the University of Derby.
    • The Orrery/The Orrery: between image and object

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2012)
    • Rory Williams: The boy who waited.

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland Press, 2016)
      This chapter considers the character of Rory Williams as a companion of the Doctor within the television series Doctor Who. The chapter considers issues of gender and masculinity within science fiction.
    • Solaris - Lem/Tarkovsky/Soderbergh: adaptations in space

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Gylphi, 2013)
    • Strange days: might as well face it you're addicted

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Cambria Press, 2012)
    • The sunshine soundtrack as aural attraction

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Routledge, 2011)
      Abstract The relationship between image track and soundtrack within film has generally privileged the moving image. Early cinema and contemporary special effects cinema have both been described as a ‘cinema of attractions’ due to the emphasis upon special effects and computer-generated imagery. Within science fiction the importance of image has been emphasised as a way of conveying alien environments and new technology. Drawing on the work of writers on sound such as Chion and Sonnenschein, on Mikhail Bakhtin's notion of the chronotope and the idea of the sublime, this paper explores the ways in which soundtrack fulfils the role of ‘aural attraction’ as an alternative way of understanding the function of sound within science fiction film. Sunshine is a British science fiction film which charts the journey of a crew travelling into the sun in order to save the earth. The soundtrack is a collaboration between Underworld and John Murphy and it draws upon ambient and dance music in order to convey the atmosphere of fear, hope and the sublime when facing the sun. In evoking the space mission the soundtrack blends sound effects and musical score to provide an evocative aural composition which accentuates, extends and replaces the visual image within the film.
    • Television dramas as memory screens

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2011)
      Abstract: Within this article I am focus upon the construction of both social and personal memories within the television drama, drawing upon Landsberg’s notion of prosthetic memory and King’s identification of ‘afterwardsness’ as ways of comprehending the construction of memory and the past within texts. The examples are The Long Walk to Finchley (Tony Saint, BBC 4, 2008) and Life on Mars (2007-8). Both dramas share a number of concerns yet each has a very different context within British television. The relationship between viewers’ adopting memories from the dramas and incorporating these into their own sets of memories, including my own memories of the dramas is considered. Equally, the negotiation of the media and public discourses as memory screens with which we interact is a primary concern.
    • You anorak!: the Doctor Who experience and experiencing Doctor Who

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013)