• The echo of Tlatelolco in contemporary Mexican protest poetry

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2005)
      The shooting of a student demonstration in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in the Tlatelolco district of Mexico City on 2 October 1968 has been the subject of many literary works, among which the Tlatelolco poetry addresses not only the event itself but also the aftermath of the massacre. Both approaches examine the relationship between the ‘yo’/‘nosotros’ and ‘ellos’ constructs, focusing on the ‘nosotros’ construct as the result of this interaction. The following analysis of this process is based on the theory of self and Other, especially René Girard's theory of the mimetics of violence and the process of scapegoating as a basis for the relationship between the individual and society within the context of a violent conflict.
    • Nothing but the Truth, take two: fighting for the reader in the Tlatelolco 1968 discourse

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2012-04)
      The hypothesis put forward in this project is that there are two mechanisms of creating a collective memory of the event: one is hegemonic (dominated by state discourses and, potentially, academic studies of the shooting), and the other is posthegemonic (dominated by literary and popular discourses). We also posit that neither mechanism produces or even aims to produce an accurate representation of the event; instead, the two systems control cognitive and affective domains in collective conscience. The present paper will compare the way the two mechanisms are used in the contemporary analyses of the Tlatelolco massacre. The two works in question are Roberto Blanco Moheno, Tlatelolco: historia de una infamia (1969), and Guillermo Balám, Tlatelolco: Reflexiones de un testigo (1969). I aim to determine whether the two authors, apparently representing the opposing camps in the Tlatelolco discourse, approach the representation of the massacre from two divergent perspectives or whether their texts are characterised by the unity of the mechanisms involved in creating a memory of the event in the collective conscience.
    • Transitory literature or 'Brave New Text'? a comparative analysis of José Agustín's work

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2007)
      This paper presents an aspect of an ongoing research project on the changing nature of the text in the works of the Onda literary movement in Mexico in the mid to late 1960s. The works analysed in this article are the stories 'La tumba' (1963) and '¿Cuál es la onda?' (1968) by José Agustín. The aim of the paper is to examine the triad of the creation/destruction/recreation of the text by identifying the changing roles played by the narrator(s) and the dissolution of the protagonists. The analysis also addresses multiple transcultural influences on the two texts and determines whether the conflicting combination thereof leads to the complete destruction of the text or the appearance of a new narrative form.
    • Under my (editorial) thumb: hegemonic masculinity and text ownership in the works of the Mexican Onda

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2010)
      Connell and Messerschmidt's article 'Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept' (2005) re-evaluates the popular term to produce 'a more complex model of gender hierarchy' (829). The notion of hierarchy influenced by power redistribution is the foundation of the present study of the works of the Mexican Onda movement. Instead of adopting an expected gender perspective, this article presents a study of text ownership based upon a narratological interpretation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a mechanism of controlling the text. The analysis will examine the power struggle between the first-person narrator and editor with a view to determining the effect this struggle has on character (re)creation. The study will employ Ricoeur's interpretation of non-linear narrative, and various studies of transculturation and its effect on the interpretations of literary texts. The texts analysed in this article include the story La tumba (1964) by José Agustín, Gustavo Sainz's novel Obsesivos días circulares (1969), and Parménides García Saldaña's short story 'Goodbye Belinda' from the collection El rey criollo (1971).