The ethos of the ICR Research Centre has been firmly grounded in its commitment to the symbiotic and seamless inter-relationship of research, scholarship, teaching and learning.

Recent Submissions

  • The Great War and British identity

    Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
    In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.
  • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

    Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
    The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.
  • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

    Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
    This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.
  • Archbishop Thomson's visitation returns for the diocese of York, 1865

    Larsen, Ruth M.; Royle, Edward; University of York (Borthwick Institute, 2006)
    In 1865 archbishop William Thomson conducted his first visitation of his diocese - an opportunity for him to get to know his diocese and to find out what the challenges for his episcopate were. In advance of his tour, the clergy and churchwardens of the diocese were sent a list of questions to answer about their churches and the parishes they served. This provided an opportunity for local people to have their say about their parishes. Questions were asked about the clergy who served the parish, about where they lived, and what other churches they served. There were also questions about the frequency of services, how often a sermon was preached, how often there were communion services and what proportion of the parish came to church. Thomson also asked a number of questions about education in the parish, with specific enquiries about how many children and adults attended schools, both daily and Sunday schools. The 654 responses to these questions from the parish clergy, known as visitation returns, form the basis of this edition. These returns are the first set to have survived for a visitation of York diocese since archbishop Drummond's visitation of 1764 (also published by the Borthwick). In Drummond's returns we caught the mid 18th century church on the eve of great social changes. In Thomson's returns we get a chance to see the Anglican church in the early morning of its response to these continuing challenges. Royle and Larsen introduce the returns with a discussion of the nature of this visitation and explore what they can tell us about Yorkshire parish life between the mid 18th century and the 19th century. There is a useful appendix giving data about each parish, the size of population, the patron of the church, the value of the living and the existence of parsonage houses.
  • “Another story for another time": The many-strandedness of a Jewish woman's storytelling tradition

    Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Wayne State University Press, 2018-05-20)
    This article is a cursory outline description of the Marks-Khymberg family tradition of Anglo-Dutch Jewish oral narrative, in its context, culminating in a preliminary analysis of one sub-cycle of tales drawn from the family repertoire.
  • East African theatres and performances

    Kasule, Samuel; Osita, Okagbue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020)
    The focus of the book is primarily performance and its dialectical relationship with culture and society in East African theatre practices and traditions. A secondary interest pursued in the book is a broader exploration and articulation of the concept of performance, much in the same way that Schechner (2002: 34) proposes it to encompass a myriad of human activities that are perceived to be “restored behaviour” or “twice behaved behaviours”. The book explores the relationship between dance, dialogue, music, recitation, song, and the theatrical performance as inscribed in various indigenous concepts. It further centres on the insights into the nature of theatre and/or performance as a cultural practice and an art form, and theatre’s relationship to culture and identity. It examines indigenous performance processes and structures that include staging techniques, proxemic principles, design and its realisation, performer-spectator relationship, the non-professionalism of the different categories of performers and theatre makers in East Africa. The study takes account of the mix of representational and presentational modes of performance, aligned to predominantly non-script-based theatre practices, which sharply contrast with the often highly stylized forms of many Asian performance traditions as well as the often realistic modes of performance of some other non-African traditions. By examining both the indigenous performance forms and practices and the ways in which their work is conceptualized, developed, and staged, this study demonstrates the potential influence of African thought and aesthetics on aspects of global contemporary theatre and performance.
  • The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

    McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J.; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2019-11-06)
    Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
  • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

    Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
    This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
  • Politics, modernism, and Bob Dylan's search for a Usable Past in the Rolling Thunder Revue

    David Holloway; University of Derby (Symbiosis, 2016-04)
    This essay considers how Bob Dylan's use of modernist style, from Cubism to Brecht's "Epic Theatre", informs his 1975 tour, The Rolling Thunder Revue.
  • Cultural and historical geographies of the arboretum

    Elliott, Paul; Watkins, Charles; Daniels, Stephen; University of Derby; university of Nottingham (Garden History Society (Gardens Trust), 2007)
    Arboretums were innovative and important developments in British, and ultimately global, landscape gardening during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Inspired by British and European traditions of landscape gardening, horticulture, agricultural improvement and botany, they were imbued with symbolism and meaning according to the circumstances of their creation, character and usage. For some nineteenth-century landscape gardeners and horticulturists, they offered global excursions in microcosm providing rational recreation, aesthetic enjoyment and botanical experimentation. Their systematic planting promoted an image of rational, objective science and appropriate behavioural responses, helping to differentiate and shape Victorian middle-class identity. However, the complex relationships between designs, management, botanical displays, organic agencies and consumption ensured contested and contingent responses and appropriations.
  • 'An Asseblage of Habits' : D.J. Waldie and Neil Campbell - A Suburban Conversation

    Neil Campbell; University of Derby (2011)
    I edited this special edition on western suburbia, selected the images and interviewed the writer D.J. Waldie for the journal.
  • The British Arboretum: Trees, Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century

    Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (Pickering and Chatto, 2011)
    This study explores the science and culture of nineteenth-century British arboretums, or tree collections. The development of arboretums was fostered by a variety of factors, each of which is explored in detail: global trade and exploration, the popularity of collecting, the significance to the British economy and society, developments in Enlightenment science, changes in landscape gardening aesthetics and agricultural and horticultural improvement.Arboretums were idealized as microcosms of nature, miniature encapsulations of the globe and as living museums. This book critically examines different kinds of arboretum in order to understand the changing practical, scientific, aesthetic and pedagogical principles that underpinned their design, display and the way in which they were viewed. It is the first study of its kind and fills a gap in the literature on Victorian science and culture.
  • The Derby Philosophers: Science and Culture in British Urban Society, 1700-1850

    Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (Manchester University Press, 2009)
    The Derby Philosophers focuses upon the activities of a group of Midland intellectuals that included the evolutionist and physician Erasmus Darwin, Rev. Thomas Gisborne the evangelical philosopher and poet, Robert Bage the novelist, Charles Sylvester the chemist and engineer, William George and his son Herbert Spencer, the internationally renowned evolutionist philosopher who coined the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’, and members of the Wedgwood and Strutt families. The book explores how, inspired by science and through educational activities, publications and institutions including the famous Derbyshire General Infirmary (1810) and Derby Arboretum (1840), the Derby philosophers strove to promote social, political and urban improvements with national and international consequences. Much more than a parochial history of one intellectual group or town, this book examines science, politics and culture during one of the most turbulent periods of British history, an age of political and industrial revolutions in which the Derby philosophers were closely involved.
  • Enlightenment, Modernity and Science: Geographies of Scientific Culture and Improvement in Georgian England

    Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (I. B. Tauris, 2010)
    Scientific culture was one of the defining characteristics of the English Enlightenment. The latest discoveries were debated in homes, institutions and towns around the country. But how did the dissemination of scientific knowledge vary with geographical location? What were the differing influences in town and country and from region to region? Enlightenment, Modernity and Science provides the first full length study of the geographies of Georgian scientific culture in England. The author takes the reader on a tour of the principal arenas in which scientific ideas were disseminated, including home, town and countryside, to show how cultures of science and knowledge varied across the Georgian landscape. Taking in key figures such as Erasmus Darwin, Abraham Bennett, and Joseph Priestley along the way, it is a work that sheds important light on the complex geographies of Georgian English scientific culture.
  • From Blood Simple to True Grit: A Conversation about the Coen Brothers’ Cinematic West

    Campbell, Neil; Kollin, Susan; Mitchell, Lee Clark; Tatum, Stephen; University of Derby (2013)
    A roundtable discussion of the Coen brothers western films in which I discuss The Big Lebowski as a postwestern
  • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

    Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
    This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
  • 'Civis Indianus Sum': ambedkar on democracy and territory during linguistic reorganisation (and partition).

    Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press., 2019-08-13)
    This article considers Ambedkar’s ideas about the implementation of democracy in India, in the context of the linguistic reorganisation of provincial administrative boundaries. In doing so, it looks to emphasise the importance of territorial configurations to Dalit politics during this period, and in particular the consequences of ‘provincialisation’, which has received little attention within the existing literature. Rethinking space by redrawing administrative territory provided Ambedkar with one potential avenue through which to escape the strictures of Dalits’ minority status. In this vision, linguistic reorganisation (and partition) were harbingers of greater democratisation and potential palliatives to the threat of Hindu majority rule at the centre. In turn, however, Ambedkar simultaneously came to perceive the creation of these new administrative spaces as marking a new form of provincial majoritarianism, despite his best efforts to form alliances with those making such demands. In this sense, the article also seeks to address some of the shared processes behind linguistic reorganisation and partition, as two related forms of territorial redrawing. In the face of these demands, and the failures of both commensuration and coalition politics, Ambedkar turned to the idea of separate settlements for Dalits, whereby they might themselves come to constitute a majority. Whilst such a novel attempt at separation and resettlement was not ultimately realised, its emergence within Ambedkar’s thought at this time points towards its significance in any history of caste and untouchability in twentieth-century South Asia.
  • 'Walking into the world of the western': David Michod's The Rover as Australian Post-Western.

    Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Wroclaw University, Poland, 2017)
    Examines David Michod's Australian film The Rover as a post-western, showing how it both uses and re-interprets the tropes of the western for a new age. In particular, it explores the global themes of the film and its transnational concerns with ecology, power and identity.
  • Affective landscapes in literature, art, and everyday life: memory, place and the senses.

    Christine Berberich,; Neil Campbel; Robert Hudson; University of Derby (Ashgate., 2016-03-09)
    Bringing together a diverse group of scholars representing the fields of cultural and literary studies, cultural politics and history, creative writing and photography, this collection examines the different ways in which human beings respond to, debate and interact with landscape. How do we feel, sense, know, cherish, memorise, imagine, dream, desire or even fear landscape? What are the specific qualities of experience that we can locate in the spaces in and through which we live? While the essays most often begin with the broadly literary - the memoir, the travelogue, the novel, poetry - the contributors approach the topic in diverse and innovative ways. The collection is divided into five sections: ’Peripheral Cultures’, dealing with dislocation and imagined landscapes'; ’Memory and Mobility’, concerning the road as the scene of trauma and movement; ’Suburbs and Estates’, contrasting American and English spaces; ’Literature and Place’, foregrounding the fluidity of the fictional and the real and the human and nonhuman; and finally, ’Sensescapes’, tracing the sensory response to landscape. Taken together, the essays interrogate important issues about how we live now and might live in the future.
  • Postwestern Literature and Criticism.

    Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press., 2016-03)
    This chapter surveys the concept of postwestern literature and examines it through a close reading of examples such as Cormac McCarthy, Willy Vlautin, Karen Tei Yamashita and John Williams.

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