The ethos of the ICR Research Centre has been firmly grounded in its commitment to the symbiotic and seamless inter-relationship of research, scholarship, teaching and learning.

Recent Submissions

  • The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

    McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J.; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2020)
    Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
  • Mapping McCarthy in the age of neoconservatism, or the politics of affect in The Road

    Holloway, David; University of Derby (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2019-04-30)
    This article reads McCarthy's The Road through the prism of post-9/11 neoconservatism, and argues that readers predisposed toward neoconservative positions on the War on Terror can find their politics validated and reinforced in McCarthy's prose.
  • Politics, modernism, and Bob Dylan's search for a Usable Past in the Rolling Thunder Revue

    David Holloway; University of Derby (Symbiosis, 2016-04)
    This essay considers how Bob Dylan's use of modernist style, from Cubism to Brecht's "Epic Theatre", informs his 1975 tour, The Rolling Thunder Revue.
  • Cultural and historical geographies of the arboretum

    Elliott, Paul; Watkins, Charles; Daniels, Stephen; University of Derby; university of Nottingham (Garden History Society (Gardens Trust), 2007)
    Arboretums were innovative and important developments in British, and ultimately global, landscape gardening during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Inspired by British and European traditions of landscape gardening, horticulture, agricultural improvement and botany, they were imbued with symbolism and meaning according to the circumstances of their creation, character and usage. For some nineteenth-century landscape gardeners and horticulturists, they offered global excursions in microcosm providing rational recreation, aesthetic enjoyment and botanical experimentation. Their systematic planting promoted an image of rational, objective science and appropriate behavioural responses, helping to differentiate and shape Victorian middle-class identity. However, the complex relationships between designs, management, botanical displays, organic agencies and consumption ensured contested and contingent responses and appropriations.
  • 'An Asseblage of Habits' : D.J. Waldie and Neil Campbell - A Suburban Conversation

    Neil Campbell; University of Derby (2011)
    I edited this special edition on western suburbia, selected the images and interviewed the writer D.J. Waldie for the journal.
  • The British Arboretum: Trees, Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century

    Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (Pickering and Chatto, 2011)
    This study explores the science and culture of nineteenth-century British arboretums, or tree collections. The development of arboretums was fostered by a variety of factors, each of which is explored in detail: global trade and exploration, the popularity of collecting, the significance to the British economy and society, developments in Enlightenment science, changes in landscape gardening aesthetics and agricultural and horticultural improvement.Arboretums were idealized as microcosms of nature, miniature encapsulations of the globe and as living museums. This book critically examines different kinds of arboretum in order to understand the changing practical, scientific, aesthetic and pedagogical principles that underpinned their design, display and the way in which they were viewed. It is the first study of its kind and fills a gap in the literature on Victorian science and culture.
  • The Derby Philosophers: Science and Culture in British Urban Society, 1700-1850

    Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (Manchester University Press, 2009)
    The Derby Philosophers focuses upon the activities of a group of Midland intellectuals that included the evolutionist and physician Erasmus Darwin, Rev. Thomas Gisborne the evangelical philosopher and poet, Robert Bage the novelist, Charles Sylvester the chemist and engineer, William George and his son Herbert Spencer, the internationally renowned evolutionist philosopher who coined the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’, and members of the Wedgwood and Strutt families. The book explores how, inspired by science and through educational activities, publications and institutions including the famous Derbyshire General Infirmary (1810) and Derby Arboretum (1840), the Derby philosophers strove to promote social, political and urban improvements with national and international consequences. Much more than a parochial history of one intellectual group or town, this book examines science, politics and culture during one of the most turbulent periods of British history, an age of political and industrial revolutions in which the Derby philosophers were closely involved.
  • Enlightenment, Modernity and Science: Geographies of Scientific Culture and Improvement in Georgian England

    Elliott, Paul A.; University of Derby (I. B. Tauris, 2010)
    Scientific culture was one of the defining characteristics of the English Enlightenment. The latest discoveries were debated in homes, institutions and towns around the country. But how did the dissemination of scientific knowledge vary with geographical location? What were the differing influences in town and country and from region to region? Enlightenment, Modernity and Science provides the first full length study of the geographies of Georgian scientific culture in England. The author takes the reader on a tour of the principal arenas in which scientific ideas were disseminated, including home, town and countryside, to show how cultures of science and knowledge varied across the Georgian landscape. Taking in key figures such as Erasmus Darwin, Abraham Bennett, and Joseph Priestley along the way, it is a work that sheds important light on the complex geographies of Georgian English scientific culture.
  • From Blood Simple to True Grit: A Conversation about the Coen Brothers’ Cinematic West

    Campbell, Neil; Kollin, Susan; Mitchell, Lee Clark; Tatum, Stephen; University of Derby (2013)
    A roundtable discussion of the Coen brothers western films in which I discuss The Big Lebowski as a postwestern
  • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

    Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
    This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
  • 'Civis Indianus Sum': ambedkar on democracy and territory during linguistic reorganisation (and partition).

    Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press., 2019-08-13)
    This article considers Ambedkar’s ideas about the implementation of democracy in India, in the context of the linguistic reorganisation of provincial administrative boundaries. In doing so, it looks to emphasise the importance of territorial configurations to Dalit politics during this period, and in particular the consequences of ‘provincialisation’, which has received little attention within the existing literature. Rethinking space by redrawing administrative territory provided Ambedkar with one potential avenue through which to escape the strictures of Dalits’ minority status. In this vision, linguistic reorganisation (and partition) were harbingers of greater democratisation and potential palliatives to the threat of Hindu majority rule at the centre. In turn, however, Ambedkar simultaneously came to perceive the creation of these new administrative spaces as marking a new form of provincial majoritarianism, despite his best efforts to form alliances with those making such demands. In this sense, the article also seeks to address some of the shared processes behind linguistic reorganisation and partition, as two related forms of territorial redrawing. In the face of these demands, and the failures of both commensuration and coalition politics, Ambedkar turned to the idea of separate settlements for Dalits, whereby they might themselves come to constitute a majority. Whilst such a novel attempt at separation and resettlement was not ultimately realised, its emergence within Ambedkar’s thought at this time points towards its significance in any history of caste and untouchability in twentieth-century South Asia.
  • 'Walking into the world of the western': David Michod's The Rover as Australian Post-Western.

    Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Wroclaw University, Poland, 2017)
    Examines David Michod's Australian film The Rover as a post-western, showing how it both uses and re-interprets the tropes of the western for a new age. In particular, it explores the global themes of the film and its transnational concerns with ecology, power and identity.
  • Affective landscapes in literature, art, and everyday life: memory, place and the senses.

    Christine Berberich,; Neil Campbel; Robert Hudson; University of Derby (Ashgate., 2016-03-09)
    Bringing together a diverse group of scholars representing the fields of cultural and literary studies, cultural politics and history, creative writing and photography, this collection examines the different ways in which human beings respond to, debate and interact with landscape. How do we feel, sense, know, cherish, memorise, imagine, dream, desire or even fear landscape? What are the specific qualities of experience that we can locate in the spaces in and through which we live? While the essays most often begin with the broadly literary - the memoir, the travelogue, the novel, poetry - the contributors approach the topic in diverse and innovative ways. The collection is divided into five sections: ’Peripheral Cultures’, dealing with dislocation and imagined landscapes'; ’Memory and Mobility’, concerning the road as the scene of trauma and movement; ’Suburbs and Estates’, contrasting American and English spaces; ’Literature and Place’, foregrounding the fluidity of the fictional and the real and the human and nonhuman; and finally, ’Sensescapes’, tracing the sensory response to landscape. Taken together, the essays interrogate important issues about how we live now and might live in the future.
  • Postwestern Literature and Criticism.

    Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press., 2016-03)
    This chapter surveys the concept of postwestern literature and examines it through a close reading of examples such as Cormac McCarthy, Willy Vlautin, Karen Tei Yamashita and John Williams.
  • Clientelism, community and collaboration: loyalism in nineteenth-century colonial India.

    Godsmark, Oliver; Gould, William; Loughborough University; University of Leeds (Boydell and Brewer, 2014-05)
    Loyalism in Britain and Ireland, which was once seen as a crude reaction against radicalism or nationalism, stimulated by the elite and blindly followed by plebeians, has recently been shown by historians to have been, on the contrary, a politically multi-faceted, socially enabling phenomenon which did much to shape identity in the British Isles. This book takes further this revised picture by considering loyalism in the wider British World. It considers the overall nature of loyalism, exploring its development in England, Ireland and Scotland, and goes on to examine its manifestation in a range of British colonies and former colonies, including the United States, Canada, India, Australia and New Zealand. It shows that whilst eighteenth-century Anglo-centric loyalism had a core of common ideological assumptions, associational structures and ritual behaviour, loyalism manifested itself differently in different territories. This divergence is explored through a discussion of the role of loyal associations and military institutions, loyalism's cultural and ritual dimensions and its key role in the formation of political identities. Chronologically, the book covers a pivotal period, comprehending the American and French Revolutions, the 1798 Irish rebellion and Irish Union, the Canadian rebellions of 1837, and Fenianism and Home Rule campaigns throughout the British World.
  • Citizenship, Reservations and the Regional Alternative in the All-India Services, ca. 1928–1950

    Godsmark, Oliver; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2015-04-08)
    This paper unearths an alternative paradigm through which to consider the discussions and debates between members of the Indian public, government bureaucrats and Congress Party politicians about the rights and interests of Indian citizens both before and immediately after India's Independence in 1947. It argues that much of the recent historical work on citizenship during this period has been preoccupied with issues of nationality and religious community as a result of the fallout from Partition. However, the demands and deliberations over the introduction of provincial forms of affirmative action in the all-India services at this time are indicative of a different narrative. First, many provincial representations of ‘minority’ rights often took into account differences of caste and language instead. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the term minority was employed not only to describe demographic minority status, but also to define under-represented groups in the all-India services. In doing so, these different provincial policies prioritised particular local rights to representation, in which citizenship was expressed through a regional idiom.
  • Citizenship, community and democracy in India: from Bombay to Maharashtra, c. 1930 to 1960.

    Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Routledge, 2018-02-05)
    This book delivers ground-breaking perspectives upon nascent conceptions and workings of citizenship and democracy during the colonial/postcolonial transition. It examines how processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years contributed to demands and concerns and offers a broadened and imaginative outlook on India’s partition. Drawing upon a novel body of archival research, the book ultimately suggests Pakistan might also be considered as just one paradigmatic example of a range of coterminous calls for regional autonomy and statehood, informed by a majoritarian democratic logic that had an extensive contemporary circulation. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of South Asian history in general and the Partition in particular as well as to those interested in British colonialism and postcolonial studies.
  • Walukagga the Black Smith

    Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Wavah Books Ltd, 2018-08)
    Walukagga (The Blacksmith) is the story of the Baganda in Uganda and their Chief whose tyrannical rule is brought to an end by a madman's wisdom. the story restores the power into the hands of the people. In the play, Walukagga challenges the growing threat of institutionalised extortion.
  • Under the Western Sky: Essays on the Fiction and Music of Willy Vlautin

    Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nevada Press, 2018)
    The first original collection of essays examining the work of Willy Vlautin as both musician and novelist, placing it within the contexts of western studies and wider theoretical frames such as critical regionalism, affect theory and cultural studies.
  • A New Gentleness: Effective Ficto-Regionality

    Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-11-01)
    Using affective critical regionality to enable a re-valuing of the local as a powerful means to appreciate the everyday and the overlooked as vital elements within a more inclusive understanding of how we live.

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