• Colour, health and wellbeing: the hidden qualities and properties of natural dyes

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (JAIC, 2013-07-31)
      Is it feasible that the chemicals present in the natural dyes and colours of both plants and insects, which in the past have been exploited for their colour, could exhibit other properties that in the future will be understood and exploited for the health and wellbeing of mankind? Historically many dye plants were once regarded to possess ‘magical properties’ with the power to heal and to keep evil away [1]. Today many of these plants that can be used for dye extraction are classified as medicinal and in recent studies have been shown to process remarkable anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-viral activity [2]. The cosmetic industry now employs many natural dyes due to the fact they will cause fewer side affects than the employment of synthetic dyestuffs but they can also provide extra properties such as UV protection, skin moisturising and anti-aging [3,4]. In the context of these facts, this paper asks the question: What possibilities exist within the chemical nature of certain natural dyes to help with healing and well-being and if in the future we will be wearing clothes dyed with such colours from nature that we will be able to enhance our well being as well as be fashionable?.
    • The creative use of salt shrinking and de-gumming of silk as a patterning technique

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby, Faculty of Art, Design & Technology (Kasetsart University Press, 2013-10)
      By employing finishing techniques to silk fabric alongside a shibori or resist process, areas of different densities can be formed within the cloth; creating textured, puckered and distorted effects. One process: salt shrinking is unknown in the western world but has evolved over the centuries within Japan. It is a tradition originally used for finishing silk crepe, where by soaking the fabric in seawater the silk fibres contracted to create more density. The effects tended to be unstable so today; calcium chloride or calcium nitrate solutions are now employed. A second process relies upon sericin or the silk gum present within a silk fibre to create texture. During the manufacturing the sericin is left on in order to protect the fibre but is then removed during scouring in order to create a soft lustrous fabric. With both processes if silk fabrics are patterned with shibori techniques, prior to the salt treatment or scouring, the resulting fabrics will contain, areas of different densities and texture with visible contrast occurring between the areas protected by the resists and those that were affected by the finishing. The textures that are produced are said to be almost permanent, but break down with severe washing.
    • The creative use of salt shrinking and de-gumming of silk as a patterning technique

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby, Faculty of Art, Design & Technology (Kasetsart University PressBangkok, Thailand, 2013-10)
      By employing finishing techniques to silk fabric alongside a shibori or resist process, areas of different densities can be formed within the cloth; creating textured, puckered and distorted effects. One process: salt shrinking is unknown in the western world but has evolved over the centuries within Japan. It is a tradition originally used for finishing silk crepe, where by soaking the fabric in seawater the silk fibres contracted to create more density. The effects tended to be unstable so today; calcium chloride or calcium nitrate solutions are now employed. A second process relies upon sericin or the silk gum present within a silk fibre to create texture. During the manufacturing the sericin is left on in order to protect the fibre but is then removed during scouring in order to create a soft lustrous fabric. With both processes if silk fabrics are patterned with shibori techniques, prior to the salt treatment or scouring, the resulting fabrics will contain, areas of different densities and texture with visible contrast occurring between the areas protected by the resists and those that were affected by the finishing. The textures that are produced are said to be almost permanent, but break down with severe washing.
    • Cyanotype and Anthotype: Eco-patterning with mineral and natural dyes

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (International Textile and Clothing Congress ITCC, 2015-11-04)
      The paper outlines collaborative research between two different disciplines: That of textile design and early colouration methods with historical photographic imaging techniques. The project considers the symbiotic relationship between natural plant extracts with ‘Anthotypes’ and raised colours specifically ‘Prussian Blue’ with ‘Cyanotypes’. The aim of which, is to consider the question: Could this kind of photographic image making be applied as a future, sustainable method of design generation, colouration and patterning of fabric for fashion and interiors? Looking at the substantive and the fugitive properties of the colouration materials along side different light wavelengths and analysing the success or failure of using Anthotypes and Cyanotype as an alternative sustainable surface design process can be attained: A form of Eco-patterning that relies upon light and natural substances/dyes not synthetic dyes as the colouring medium
    • Fabric dyeing and printing

      Wells, Kate (Conran Octopus Limited, 2000)
      Fabric Dyeing and Printing guides the reader through the choice of fabric types, the range of dye recipes and the profusion of traditional and new techniques. Exploring the patterning options with the help of detailed step-by-step photography, this book enables the reader to choose and work through any one of the over 30 techniques including: Preparing natural dyes; to printing with foils; hand-block printing to screen printing and the use of resist techniques. In addition, the work of contemporary designers such as Georgina von Eztdorf, Timney Fowler, Cressida Bell, and Janet Stoyle, is highlighted to demonstrate how techniques can be combined and interpreted.
    • ‘Invent-re-invent Itajime: digital board clamping’

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby, Faculty of Art, Design & Technology (Kasetsart University, 2013-10)
      Across the world the ancient technique of board clamping, as a patterning technique for silk fabric has been constantly invented and reinvented, but over the last few centuries it use has declined to almost extinction. The history and origins of the technique is an enigma as there are examples in Japan that date from the 8th Century but subsequent examples are very scarce until a re-appearance of the technique in Japan in the 19th Century. Today with the advances in laser cutting and CNC woodworking there is scope for its reinvention and a revival. These machines can be employed to replace the woodcarvers’ skill that was once needed for the creation of matching wooded plates, whereas the process of coloration returns back to the hand of the dyer. It is a case of technology meets hand, to create uniquely patterned one-off fabrics. Pairs of precision cut clamping boards made to fit perfectly together unite with the dyeing process creating a randomness that allows variability and creativity within the technique, imparting a uniqueness within the final silk fabrics produced.
    • More than Nature's colours

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (2013-07)
      Is it feasible that the chemicals present in the natural dyes and colours of both plants and insect, which in the past have been exploited for their colour, could exhibit other properties that in the future will be understood and exploited for the health and wellbeing of mankind? In this paper, I will discuss this and other questions as to the possibilities that may exist within the chemical nature of certain natural dyes to help with healing and well-being and if in the future we will be wearing clothes dyed with such colours from nature that we will be able to enhance our well being as well as being fashionable? Historically many dye plants were once regarded to possess ‘magical properties’ with the power to heal and to keep evil away. Today many of these plants that can be used for dye extraction are classified as medicinal and in recent studies have been shown to process remarkable anti-microbial activity. The cosmetic industry now employs many natural dyes due to the fact they will cause fewer side affects than the employment of synthetic dye stuffs and but they also provide extra properties such as UV protection and anti-aging. Chengaiah et al (2010:1).
    • More than Nature's colours

      Wells, Kate (2013-07)
      Is it feasible that the chemicals present in the natural dyes and colours of both plants and insect, which in the past have been exploited for their colour, could exhibit other properties that in the future will be understood and exploited for the health and wellbeing of mankind? In this paper, I will discuss this and other questions as to the possibilities that may exist within the chemical nature of certain natural dyes to help with healing and well-being and if in the future we will be wearing clothes dyed with such colours from nature that we will be able to enhance our well being as well as being fashionable? Historically many dye plants were once regarded to possess ‘magical properties’ with the power to heal and to keep evil away. Today many of these plants that can be used for dye extraction are classified as medicinal and in recent studies have been shown to process remarkable anti-microbial activity. The cosmetic industry now employs many natural dyes due to the fact they will cause fewer side affects than the employment of synthetic dye stuffs and but they also provide extra properties such as UV protection and anti-aging. Chengaiah et al (2010:1).
    • The Observatory’ Issue One ‘BEIGE’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2009-09)
      This is issue one of ‘The Observatory’ is an ongoing research project, exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Observatory’ Issue Three ‘TANGERINE’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2011-11)
      This is issue three of ‘The Observatory’, which is an ongoing research project exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Observatory’ Issue Two ‘VERMILION’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2010-10)
      This is issue two of ‘The Observatory’, which is an ongoing research project exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Dyers' craft: resist patterned textiles

      Hann, Michael; Wells, Kate (The University Gallery, Leeds, 2000-07)