• Ricoeur and the negation of happiness

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Continuum Bloomsbury, 2013-10)
      Ricoeur lectured and wrote for over twenty years on negation ('Do I understand something better if I know what it is not, and what is not-ness?') and never published his extensive writings on this subject. Ricoeur concluded that there are multiple forms of negation; it can, for example, be the other person (Plato), the not knowable nature of our world (Kant), the included opposite (Hegel), apophatic spirituality (Plotinus on not being able to know God) and existential nothingness (Sartre). Ricoeur, working on Kant, Hegel and Sartre, decided that all these forms of negation are incompatible and also fatally flawed because they fail to resolve false binaries of negative: positive. Alison Scott-Baumann demonstrates how Ricoeur subsequently incorporated negation into his linguistic turn, using dialectics, metaphor, narrative, parable and translation in order to show how negation is in us, not outside us: language both creates and clarifies false binaries. He bestows upon negation a strong and central role in the human condition, and its inevitability is reflected in his writings, if we look carefully. Ricoeur and the Negation of Happiness draws on Ricoeur's published works, previously unavailable archival material and many other sources. Alison Scott-Baumann argues that thinking positively is necessary but not sufficient for aspiring to happiness - what is also required is affirmation of negative impulses: we know we are split by contradictions and still try to overcome them. She also demonstrates the urgency of analysing current socio-cultural debates about wellbeing, education and equality, which rest insecurely upon our loose use of the negative as a category mistake.
    • Learning from experience leading to engagement: for a Europe of religion and belief diversity

      Weller, Paul; Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (CEJI, 2012-10-18)
    • How to build bridges between universities and Muslim colleges in Britain with partnerships and curricula

      Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Higher Education Academy (HEA) Islamic Studies Network (ISN), 2012-07-04)
      Within Britain there are demands for better, more inclusive understanding of Islam and the West. Internationally there are major changes afoot in the Arab world and it is likely that these changes will have a significant impact on British Muslims, who hold loyalties to the umma (the world wide Muslim community) as well as their allegiances to Britain. It is difficult to predict what form this impact will take, but all the more necessary to ensure that proper channels for inter-community and interfaith dialogue and debate are open. Over the last five years we have worked on three approaches to improving practical understanding in British higher education between Islamic and secular cultures; first, looking at partnerships between Muslim colleges and mainstream universities (Mukadam et al 2010); secondly, working with Muslim women to develop modules that can be taught within mainstream courses (Cheruvallil-Contractor and Scott-Baumann 2011) and thirdly, investigating the health of Arabic teaching in Britain (Scott-Baumann and Cheruvallil-Contractor 2012).
    • Muslim women in Britain: demystifying the Muslimah

      Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby, Centre for Society, Religion & Belief (Routledge, 2012-07)
      Perceptions of Muslim women in Western society have been shaped by historical and sociological conditions such as colonialism, patriarchy and Orientalism. In Muslim Women in Britain, Sariya Contractor seeks to reinstate the Muslimah as a storyteller who tells her own story. An exploration of the lives of British Muslim women, this book examines issues of femininity, Britishness, inter-communal relations and social cohesion. Presenting the reader with incisive narratives of Muslim women on familiar topics such as the hijab, Muslim women in the media and feminist debate, particularly in a Western context, Sariya Contractor makes a valuable contribution to the existing literature on Islamic studies, social anthropology, feminist philosophy and social cohesion. Presenting a complex and nuanced retelling of Muslim women’s realities as explored through their own voices, stories and experiences; this book will be of interest to scholars and students of Islamic studies, Women’s studies, Social Anthropology and Sociology seeking a fresh perspective on Muslim women in Britain.
    • Arabic language and Islamic Studies: who studies Arabic and how can these skills be used at university and beyond?

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (Higher Education Academy (HEA), 2012-03)
      This work was undertaken in 2011-12 as the result of successful competitive bidding for research funds from the subject centre for Languages, Linguistics and Area Studies (LLAS). Learning a modern foreign language in UK has declined, yet the learning of Arabic is rising. Furthermore HEFCE designates Arabic as a Strategically Important and Vulnerable Subject (SIVS). This is important as it implies greater resources and support for Arabic courses. Although Classical Arabic previously had a code, the SIVS status of Arabic has increased its visibility and has led to four new codes for Arabic Language Studies, Modern Standard Arabic and related subjects in HESA’s latest JACS 3 listing (September 2011). We hypothesised that there is more Arabic language interest and competence among Islamic Studies students than is currently apparent in the university sector and in the independent Muslim institution sector, and found persuasive evidence for our hypothesis: moreover, we found that if the Arabic experience is neither assessed nor accredited this may represent missed career opportunities for such students. We explored possible relationships between students’ prior Arabic competence and Arabic language courses at Islamic Studies and other departments within UK universities. This study recognises the significance of Arabic language studies that students undertake in Muslim institutions such as Darul Ulooms, Madaris (singular madrassa), Muslim schools and Muslim HE colleges. It suggests that collaborations between Muslim institutions and universities could lead to cross fertilisation of curricula and pedagogy and staff exchanges. Furthermore, recognising students’ prior learning of Arabic could be beneficial to students, who would have options to enhance their skills and career opportunities, and also to universities who would have access to an increased cohort of potential students.
    • ‘In confidence: Thai economic virility, internal angst, and The Market: so, what’s next then?’

      Faulkner, Frank; University of Derby, Society, Religion and Belief Research Group (Shinawatra International University Press, 2011-06)
      This paper will examine the concept of confidence as it relates to economics, and will also apply it to the Thai paradigm. The reasoning for taking this approach is to understand and rationalize Thai economic dynamism in a period of relative global economic austerity, and also in the context of domestic unease. With these issues discussed and established, the paper will then offer some analysis of the likely imputations for future socio-economic development.
    • 'Marginalisation or an opportunity for dialogue: exploring the Hijab as a discursive symbol of the identity of young Muslim women

      Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (Continuum Publishing Corporation, 2011-04-21)
      This volume is centred around the theme of veiling in Islam and provides multifarious aspects of the discussion regarding veiling of Muslim women, especially in the West. The issue of veiling has been intensively debated in Western society and has implications for religious liberty, inter-communal relationships and cultural interaction. Islam and the Veil seeks to generate open and objective discussion of this highly important, though controversial, subject, with contributions from distinguished scholars and academics, including female practitioners of Islam. This subject has inflamed passions and generated heated debate in the media in recent years, particularly in the West. This book aims to look at the historical background, theological and social factors underlying the veiling of women in Islam. Such discussion will provide the reader with a well-balanced and unbiased analysis of this important aspect of Islamic practice.
    • ‘Unveiling Orientalism in reverse’

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Continuum Bloomsbury, 2011)
      This volume is centred around the theme of veiling in Islam and provides multifarious aspects of the discussion regarding veiling of Muslim women, especially in the West. The issue of veiling has been intensively debated in Western society and has implications for religious liberty, inter-communal relationships and cultural interaction. Islam and the Veil seeks to generate open and objective discussion of this highly important, though controversial, subject, with contributions from distinguished scholars and academics, including female practitioners of Islam. This subject has inflamed passions and generated heated debate in the media in recent years, particularly in the West. This book aims to look at the historical background, theological and social factors underlying the veiling of women in Islam. Such discussion will provide the reader with a well-balanced and unbiased analysis of this important aspect of Islamic practice.
    • ‘Can I play with madness?'.The psychopathy of Evil, leadership, and political mis-management.

      Faulkner, Frank; University of Derby, Society, Religion and Belief Research Group (Rodopi Press, 2010-06)
      This paper will examine the psychopathy of evil as an aspect of political leadership, and noting Machiavelli’s treatment of the subject as it applies to leaders, often juxtaposed by Chomsky’s pronouncements. The rationale for this approach is within the observation that GW Bush and A Blair, as contemporary examples, have evaded prosecution for civilian deaths in Iraq, despite mounting evidence that they are directly responsible for the conduct of the Coalition military in that region. The above must be viewed in the context of opposition groups, such as Stop the War, The Lancet medical journal, Iraqbodycount.com, and Military Families Against the War, as supposed moral entrepreneurs and self-appointed ethical guardians, who consistently argue for an immediate withdrawal of troops amid mounting concern over non-combatant casualties. Moreover, evil as a concept in this scenario is apparently being ‘normalised’ in the media as an everyday or trivial event, often below celebrity indiscretions in news running orders. So, is this a deliberate ’downplaying’ of evil, or merely an acceptance of the banality of pernicious political leadership? This paper will unearth the facts versus the rhetoric, and come to a suitable judgement based on available evidence.
    • Ricoeur's translation model as a mutual labour of understanding

      Scott-Baumann, Alison (Sage, 2010)
      Ricoeur has written about translation as an ethical paradigm. Translation from one language to another, and within one’s own language, provides both a metaphor and a real mechanism for explaining oneself to the other.Attempting and failing to achieve symmetry between two languages is a manifestation of the asymmetry inherent in human relationships. If actively pursued, translation can show us how to forgive other people for being different from us and thus serves as a paradigm for tolerance. In full acceptance that this will be impossible, Ricoeur uses the model of translation as a way of understanding European integration, with three aspects: translation, shared narrative and shared forgiveness of Europe’s history. These models provide a strong statement about tolerance and become even more significant through their conversation with the negativity that suffuses them. He draws on his knowledge of psychoanalysis to explain that the translator suffers through remembering and through mourning the loss of perfection; there must be acknowledgement of deficiency. This acceptance of imperfection and of limits to success is a key element in Ricoeur’s philosophy and is explored from the 1950s onwards in his study of negativity; denied by phenomenology and explored by Hegel. Negation is vital for understanding the world (this word means this, not that), but it can preclude us from access to meaning when it becomes negativity (this word has no meaning because it is different). Translation can provide the bridge to span the tension between the pathology of denial and different interpretations, and projection of evil into others, which I believe is at the heart of the perceived incompatibilities between Islam and the West. There is a political urgency to this enterprise, given the ‘othering’ of the Muslim world that has replaced the Cold War dichotomies between Communist as ‘other’ and the capitalist world. References to the Muslim as the current ‘other’ will be part of my discussion. As well as seeking to understand Ricoeur’s model of translation, we will examine whether his model works in a world where many speak no Arabic, Urdu or Farsi, or indeed whether it has any relevance for people who do not.
    • Ricoeur and the hermeneutics of suspicion

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Continuum Bloomsbury, 2009)
      Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005) was one of the most prolific and influential French philosophers of the Twentieth Century. In his enormous corpus of work he engaged with literature, history, historiography, politics, theology and ethics, while debating ‘truth’ and ethical solutions to life in the face of widespread and growing suspicion about whether such a search is either possible or worthwhile. In Ricoeur and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion, Alison Scott-Baumann takes a thematic approach that explores Ricoeur’s lifelong struggle to be both iconoclastic and yet hopeful, and avoid the slippery slope to relativism. Through an examination of the ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’, the book reveals strong continuities throughout his work, as well as significant discontinuities, such as the marked way in which he later distanced himself from the ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’ and his development of new devices in its place, while seeking a hermeneutics of recovery. Scott-Baumann offers a highly original analysis of the hermeneutics of suspicion that will be useful to the fields of philosophy, literature, theology and postmodern social theory.
    • The sociological implications for contemporary Buddhism in the UK: socially engaged Buddhism, a case study

      Henry, Philip M.; University of Derby (Dickinson Blogs, 2006)
      Buddhist Studies has, for well over a century, been seen by many in the academy as the domain of philologists and others whose skills are essentially in the translation and interpretation of texts derived from ancient languages like classical Chinese, Pāli, Sanskrit, and its hybrid variations, together with the commentarial tradition that developed alongside it. Only in the last thirty-five years has there been an increasing number of theses, journal articles, and other academic texts that have seriously addressed the developments of a Western Buddhism as opposed to Buddhism in the West. As Prebish (2002:66) attests, based on his own 1975 experience of teaching Buddhism in the United States, “Even a casual perusal of the most popular books used as texts in introductory courses on Buddhism at that time reveals that Western Buddhism was not included in the discipline called Buddhist Studies.” Fundamentally, this paper addresses Buddhist identity in contemporary settings, and asks what it means to be Buddhist in the West today. This is the overarching theme of my doctoral research into socially engaged Buddhism in the United Kingdom, which addresses the question of how socially engaged Buddhism challenges the notion of what it means to be Buddhist in the twenty-first century.