• Ambiguity, uncertainty and new realities: perspectives of creative value, utility and authenticity

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (KIE, Knowledge, Innovation & Enterprise, 2015)
      The concept of creativity is synonymous with the formulation of value judgements. Related primarily to the experience of new and unfamiliar ideas, creativity is a subject directly connected to conceptions of adjustment, re-calibration, measurement and evaluation. Albeit a subjective term open to considerable flexibility of interpretation, creativity has nevertheless become a capacity and commodity of notionally high social and economic value. Consequently, creativity has never been subject to greater scrutiny and judgement and understanding of creative value subject to greater discussion and evaluation. Exploring aspects of creativity associated with ambiguity and uncertainty through the discourse of authenticity and aesthetics, this chapter positions analysis in the narratives of insight and imagination, the romanticism of discovery and talent, and debates about the increasing virtualisation of creative practice and emerging prospect of artificial creativity. Investigating the potential for what might be described as authentic creativity, notions of forgery and fakery, serendipity, accidental discovery, and the dynamics of positive and negative creative conditions, provide a basis for focused consideration of the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of creative activity and the various ways these relate to the determination of value in the ‘what’ of creative outcomes. Exploring first the nature of creative value and closely related definitions of creativity, consideration is then given to the temporal and cultural dynamics of creative value judgements before focusing more specifically on contexts of creativity and areas of creative ambiguity. Introducing a series of illustrative case studies, discussion focuses on the parameters of creative value judgements to underpin a tentative definition of creative authenticity. Conclusions highlight a range of possible perspectives related to the subjective nature of creativity and definitions of creative value. Creativity and creative value can be determined simply according to the scale of impact on human well-being, progress, fulfilment, security, or other suitable value indicator, the quality of lived human experience, the intrinsic qualities of the object, artefact or activity, or combination of all three. Given the inherent diversity and instability of creation and reception contexts, the search for any form objective measure of creative value may be a fruitless one. However, it is in the very subjectivity of creative experience that creative authenticity is most visible.
    • Between possibilities and places: cognitive metaphor, creativity, art and education

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE, 2013-09-10)
    • Conformity, deformity and reformity

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (West East Institute, 2015)
      In any given field of artistic practice, practitioners position themselves—or find themselves positioned—according to interests and allegiances with specific movements, genres, and traditions. Selecting particular frameworks through which to approach the development of new ideas, patterns and expressions, balance is invariably maintained between the desire to contribute towards and connect with a particular set of domain conventions, whilst at the same time developing distinction and recognition as a creative individual. Creativity through the constraints of artistic domain, discipline and style provides a basis for consideration of notions of originality in the context of activity primarily associated with reconfiguration, manipulation and reorganisation of existing elements and ideas. Drawing from postmodern and post-structuralist perspectives in the analysis of modern hybrid art forms and the emergence of virtual creative environments, the transition from traditional artistic practice and notions of craft and creation, to creative spaces in which elements are manipulated, mutated, combined and distorted with often frivolous or subversive intent are considered. This paper presents an educational and musically focused perspective of the relationship between the individual and domain-based creative practice. Drawing primarily from musical and audio-visual examples with particular interest in creative disruption of pre-existing elements, creative strategies of appropriation and recycling are explored in the context of music composition and production. Conclusions focus on the interpretation of creativity as essentially a process of recombination and manipulation and highlight how the relationship between artist and field of practice creates unique creative spaces through which new ideas emerge.
    • Conformity, deformity and reformity

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (Knowledge, Innovation & Enterprise, 2015)
      In any given field of artistic practice, practitioners position themselves—or find themselves positioned—according to interests and allegiances with spe- cific movements, genres, and traditions. Selecting particular frameworks through which to approach the development of new ideas, patterns and ex- pressions, balance is invariably maintained between the desire to contribute towards and connect with a particular set of domain conventions, whilst at the same time developing distinction and recognition as a creative individual. Creativity through the constraints of artistic domain, discipline and style pro- vides a basis for consideration of notions of originality in the context of activ- ity primarily associated with reconfiguration, manipulation and reorganisation of existing elements and ideas. Drawing from postmodern and post- structuralist perspectives in the analysis of modern hybrid art forms and the emergence of virtual creative environments, the transition from traditional artistic practice and notions of craft and creation, to creative spaces in which elements are manipulated, mutated, combined and distorted with often frivo- lous or subversive intent are considered. This chapter presents an educational and musically focused perspective of the relationship between the individual and domain-based creative practice. Drawing primarily from musical and audio-visual examples with particular interest in creative disruption of pre-existing elements, creative strategies of appropriation and recycling are explored in the context of music composition and production. Conclusions focus on the interpretation of creativity as essen- tially a process of recombination and manipulation and highlight how the relationship between artist and field of practice creates unique creative spaces through which new ideas emerge.
    • Creative dynamics: artistic production as a model of creative interaction

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (Knowledge, Innovation & Enterprise, 2014)
      Defining creativity in musical terms and the extent to which theories of crea- tivity may reflect and inform creative practice within a UK university arts-based college is at the heart of this chapter. Creative thinking in music, particularly with reference to com- mercial application is where the investigation begins; models of collaborative interaction, which is a fundamental preoccupation for undergraduate popular music students, are re- viewed and evaluated highlighting the boundaries within which composers are required to work to attain commercial authenticity. Beyond this, the development of an applicable creativity toolkit is discussed which has the potential to challenge aesthetic sensibilities al- lowing students to transcend the boundaries of the familiar and explore domains less famil- iar. The chapter concludes by validating the benefits of collaborative creative activities par- ticularly with reference to multi-modal interaction and the role of technology.
    • Extending realities: creativity, artistry and technology

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (KIE, 2013-09-10)
    • Making projects sing: a musical perspective of project management

      Wilson, Chris; Sivaraman, R; Brown, Michael; McCormack, Danny; Business Expert Press (Business Expert Press, 2016)
      This book explores project management (PM) from a musical perspective. Seeking ways of understanding PM in musical ways, distinctive approaches to the management of risk, experimentation, the conception and practice of teams, and the realization of imagination, are explored to highlight both the synergies and distinctions between musical practice and project management in the wider corporate and industrial sectors. The intention being to surface insights of value, capable of adaptation and practical application in a range of contexts, a series of conceptual models and thinking exercises are presented, each designed to structure a more musical approach to project management and capable of application at every scale of project management, and every possible project management environment. The contention of this book is that music provides an interesting context through which to consider project management practice, and therefore a unique opportunity to approach project management from both a different viewpoint and a different mindset. Music is a vibrant field of activity incorporating distinctive approaches to the development and maintenance of expertise, the transfer of knowledge, and the realization of remarkable cultural creativity. Synergies between musical practice and the wider project management profession are many and varied, and more musical approaches to project management may not only be possible, but may also be an engaging means of developing creativity in project outcomes.
    • Sound, space, image and music: hybridity in creative process through technology, interactivity and collaboration

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Intellect, 2012-05-22)
      This article explores the dynamic interaction of sound and image creativity through technology. Focusing on the potential significance of the blurring of boundaries between the visual and the auditory in artistic perception and creative procedure, and more fluid approaches to collaboration and artistic interaction through technology and virtual environments, issues are explored through the development and exhibition of original artwork. Developing mixed-media outcomes, reflections of particular aspects of human interaction with physical spaces emerged as a persistent theme in collaborative work, technology providing an adaptable mechanism and medium of craft, as well as an influence on perspective and artistic perception. This article develops a contextual evaluation of the project, whilst focusing on the implications of technology for artistic practice and higher education. With an emphasis on the development and understanding of musical creativity, the virtualization of compositional process and potential for enrichment of pedagogy and artistry are considered.