• Evaluating the Legacy Careers Project.

      Marriott, John; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014-03-18)
      The Legacy Careers Project was a five day programme of career enrichment activities for schools in East London. The programme ran from June to December 2013 with students moving from Year 8 to Year 9. It provided information and activities to support students to better understand their future career options. The project takes its inspiration from the Olympic Games and is informed by the opportunities offered by Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. This paper sets out the findings of an evaluation of the project conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. The evaluation concludes that the project was successful. Evaluators noted the delivery of an effective and coherent career learning programme that aligned well with best practice in the sector. Key indicators of success are as follows: • Students who participated in the programme reported that they enjoyed the experience and found it useful; • A high level of learning could be observed throughout the programme; • Students reported that they had developed their skills and attributes through the programme; • There was evidence of greater purposefulness in thinking about their next career destination; • The programme exceeded the initial target of 200 participants by providing 770 students (year 8, moving to year 9) and an additional 70 team leaders (year 12) with career enrichment activities outside of the classroom; • There was a high level of positive engagement from the schools involved in the programme; and • The programme also provided opportunities for a group of sixth form team leaders. These students also reported improvements in their self-confidence (53%), leadership skills (47%) and other skills and attributes.
    • Evaluation of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber Inspiration activity and good practice guide

      Artess, Jane; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (2017-03)
      The research suggests that Careers Yorkshire and the Humber (CYH) is continuing to make good progress in its inspiration work and fulfilling the expectations that it set itself in its Inspiration plans. Whilst celebrating its continuing achievements CYH is set on a journey of improvement and is actively seeking to continue to work collaboratively with partners, to make the most of its networks, to continue to provide impartial, labour market information and to grow the infrastructure to meet the needs of young people and their parents and advisers for reliable career-related information and support activities. The context for CYH’s inspiration work during 2016-2017 has become more complex as more organisations and services become available. This presents challenges but also opportunities which CYH appear to have grasped with enthusiasm.
    • Evaluation of outreach interventions for under 16 year olds: Tools and guidance for higher education providers.

      Harrison, Neil; Vigurs, Katy; Crockford, Julian; McCaig Colin; Squire, Ruth; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (Office for Students (OfS), 2018-12-13)
      During 2017-18, OFFA commissioned research that aimed to understand the nature of outreach activities for under 16 year olds (which were funded through access and participation investment) and how these were evaluated. This document, developed from the research, is intended to act as a resource for pre-16 outreach practitioners and evaluators, drawing both on the data collected by this project and the wider literature around evaluation and outreach. It seeks to recognise the complexity of pre-16 outreach work and eschews a prescriptive approach in favour of establishing important principles and actions that are likely to underpin good practice. Our discussion is broadly positioned within a ‘social realist’ worldview (Archer, 2008; Pawson, 2013) that seeks to understand the fuzzy nature of the cause-and-effect relationships that exist within complex social fields, where individuals construct their own realities in reference to those around them. There is a particular focus on epistemology – the pathways to creating dependable, if contingent, knowledge – as a vehicle for making meaning from data that is usually incomplete, compromised or mediated through young people’s emergent constructions of their worlds. Fundamentally, outreach is predicated on the ability of practitioners to influence young people in a planned way, albeit that the plan will not always work for every young person in every cohort. An important element in this epistemology is that it is not concerned with finding single ‘solutions’ that exist outside time and context. Rather, it is concerned with understanding how young people are influenced by their life experiences – not ‘what works’, but what works in a given context and, importantly, why. It is only through understanding the latter element that practices can become robustly effective in the long-term and potentially transferable to other contexts. This is particularly appropriate to pre-16 outreach work due to the lengthy time lag between activity and application to higher education (HE).
    • Evaluation of premiership rugby’s HITZ learning academy programme

      Defeyter, Greta; Graham, Pamela; Atkins, Liz; Harvey-Golding, Louise; Crilley, E; Northumbria University (Premiership Rugby/Northumbria University, Healthy Living Lab, 2017-06)
      N/A
    • Evaluation of the careers leader training

      Williams, Joy; Akehurst, Georgie; Alexander, Kate; Pollard, Emma; Williams, Ceri; Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Employment Studies; University of Derby (Institute of Employment Studies, 2020-05)
      This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the careers leaders training programme which was funded by the Careers & Enterprise Company.
    • An evaluation of the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire collaborative outreach programme

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-05)
      In the East Midlands the NCOP consortia is the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme (DANCOP) which is a progression of NEMCON (North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network) and is comprised from several universities and colleges of further education. DANCOP’s initial two goals were: 1. Raise learners’ motivation to work hard and their understanding of the importance of education in their future: 2. Equip learners to plan for progression and make appropriate choices for post-16 study and HE. This report includes an extensive review of literature on widening access, collaboration and networks and details a formative and summative evaluation undertaken by The International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) using data collected from February 2017 to May 2019. It reports on the progress made by DANCOP up until April 2019 with respect to: 1. The development of the collaborative network 2. The extent to which schools and learners have been engaged 3. The perceived impact of activities on learners, feedback from learners, teachers and parents and distance travelled with respect to knowledge/attitudes/intentions pertaining to future options and in particular higher education 4. Innovations in collaborative working and widening access The evaluation has captured data from surveys, interviews and focus groups from DANCOP team members, management group members, learners, teaching and school staff, session deliverers and third party providers. KEY FINDINGS 1. The network is well established amongst the HEIs, external stakeholders and FE colleges 2. DANCOP has surpassed its targets with respect to school engagement and learner interactions 3. It took a long time to establish the central and hub teams and recruit college based roles, partly because of the policies and processes inherent in HEIs and FECs but also because of non-competitive salaries and short term contracts. 4. It took a long time to build awareness in schools and develop good working relationships so that activities could be delivered. In short term funded programmes this is a problem. 5. DANCOP could work more quickly if legal, recruitment and financial issues and executive sign off could be facilitated. 6. Collaborative work has been supported by: a. Representation of key partners across different management groups b. The structural and physical location of teams and individuals c. An agile Steering Group and inclusion of further education colleges through the IPG d. ‘Blended Professionals’ who have significant experience, knowledge and skills and are able to cross boundaries to get work done 7. Key innovations have been the IPG, a small but agile steering group and using funding for longer term resources such as skills study coaches in colleges and the STEM Centre. 8. With respect to activities, feedback has been almost entirely positive, and this includes learners, teachers, DANCOP staff funded roles and parents. This has been the case across the wide range of different activities which have been delivered, across year groups and across delivery teams. 9. Activity evaluations show participants report significant increases in knowledge about HE and confidence. 10. Comparisons of knowledge, attitudes and intentions between DANCOP and non DANCOP learners suggest there have been the desired changes in DANCOP learners. They have shown increased likelihood of attending FE and HE, increased sense of academic fit, increased confidence and increased knowledge of HE.
    • An evaluation of the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme: interim evaluation.

      Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-10-24)
      The Context The National Collaborative Outreach Programme (NCOP) was developed to support the Government in meeting three goals: 1. Double the proportion of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds in higher education (HE) by 2020 2. Increase by 20 per cent the number of pupils in HE from ethnic minority groups 3. Address the under-representation of young men from disadvantaged backgrounds in HE. In the East Midlands the NCOP consortia is the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme (DANCOP) which is a progression of NEMCON (North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network) and is comprised from several universities and colleges of further education. DANCOP’s initial two goals were: 1. Raise learners’ motivation to work hard and their understanding of the importance of education in their future: 2. Equip learners to plan for progression and make appropriate choices for post-16 study and HE. Aim/Methods This interim report includes an extensive review of literature on widening participation, collaboration and networks and details a formative evaluation undertaken by The International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) using data collected from February 2017 to March 2018. It reports on the progress made by DANCOP up until March 2018 with respect to: 1. The development of an effective collaborative network 2. The extent to which schools have been engaged 3. The nature of student feedback received so far and distance travelled with respect to knowledge/attitudes/intentions pertaining to future options and in particular higher education 4. Innovations in collaborative working and widening participation The formative evaluation has so far captured data from surveys, interviews and focus groups from DANCOP team members, management group members, students and third party providers. Key Findings 1. The network is well established amongst the HEIs, external stakeholders and some FE colleges 2. FE colleges are facing an unprecedented upheaval with significant changes to the sector, pressures on staff to meet targets, mergers and redundancies. In this difficult and uncertain climate some of the college partners have been unable to engage effectively in the partnership. 3. It has taken a long time to establish the central and hub teams, primarily because of the policies and processes inherent in HEIs and FECs. Additionally it takes a long time to build awareness in schools and develop good working relationships so that WP activities can be delivered. The project life span needs to be extended for its full potential to be realised and for impacts to be properly evaluated. 4. DANCOP could work more quickly if legal issues and executive sign off could be facilitated. Dealing with the implications of GDPR has taken a lot of capacity. 5. Collaborative work has been supported by: a. Representation of key partners across different management groups b. The structural and physical location of teams and individuals c. An agile Steering Group d. ‘Blended Professionals’ who have significant experience, knowledge and skills and are able to cross boundaries to get work done 6. DANCOP has been able to engage with a large number of learners although these have tended to be located in a small number of schools. At March 2018 the majority of interactions had been delivered through the third party provider IntoUniversity. Year 11 students were the year group who have had the most engagement with activities. 7. Innovative approaches to WP can be seen already but some may not be eligible for the funding or able to demonstrate specific impacts which may be at a cost to pupils. 8. Initial feedback, both quantitative and qualitative, from pupils indicates that activities are perceived positively. The activities, in the short term at least, have a favourable impact on levels of knowledge, confidence, intentions to attend and motivation to work hard Recommendations 1. That the lifespan of the initiative is increased significantly in order to meet targets and evaluate long term impact. 2. That NCOP provides legal advice and support regarding elements such as data sharing agreements. 3. That there is more efficacious system for executive sign off on contracts for projects. 4. That colleges and hubs consider how to integrate their team members both within the institution (i.e. located structurally and physically within appropriate departments) and with each other to facilitate support, communication and collaboration. 5. That DANCOP produces a shared calendar of events for hubs and central team members. There might also be an internal online forum for all partners and members of teams to access in order to share best practice, challenges and develop resolutions. The Final Report Will include data from more students, teaching and SLT staff, Governance Board members, all third party providers and follow ups with the DANCOP team. Additionally it will include analyses of the CFE survey data from October 2017 and September 2018 to examine shift in knowledge, attitudes and intentions over time. Finally it will include case studies on innovative widening participation activities
    • An evaluation of the INSPiRED teenager framework

      Clark, Lewis; Parry, Caroline; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2019-10-01)
      Teenagers frequently struggle to make informed career choices and often turn to their parents or carers for help. In response to this, the INSPiRED Teenager framework was developed to encourage collaborative career-based learning between parents and carers and their teenage child. A mixedmethods approach was implemented to explore the effectiveness of the two programme delivery formats. The findings show evidence of improving teenagers’ career confidence and career direction clarity and also parents/carers’ understanding of the changing world of work, their ability to have informed conversations with their teenagers, and their confidence and clarity to help their teenager make informed career decisions
    • Evaluation of the INSPiRED teenager programme

      Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-04-01)
      The INSPiRED Teenager programme is a variant of the existing INSPiRED framework (RE -INSPiRED Professional and INSPiRED Team programmes) that was successfully developed and tested in 2015. The framework provides an easy to learn self or facilitated coaching process by which participants can conduct regular career reviews throughout their working life. INSPiRED Teenager in particular is grounded in helping parents and carers to enable their teenagers to identify a purpose and combine this with their potential to improve career clarity and confidence in a radically changing labour market. While research suggests some 70% of teenagers turn to their parents for help, and that 56% of parents feel ill-equipped to help, the world of work is continuing to change due to technological developments. In response to this, the INSPiRED Teenager programme was developed as many young people are now need to adapt, pivot and continually learn new skills as new careers and training routes open up. The evaluation set out to assess the effectiveness of the two delivery formats, the effectiveness of the programme in helping to improve teenagers’ career confidence and clarity, and the effectiveness of the programme to support parents/carers to have informed conversations with their teenagers about their future careers.
    • An evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of good career guidance

      Hanson, Jill; Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; University of Debry (University of Derby, 2021-03-01)
      This report presents the findings of a four year (2016-2019) formative and summative evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of Good Career Guidance. It uses quantitative and qualitative data collected from school and college staff, learners and stakeholders, as well as Gatsby Benchmark self-audit data, financial data and data pertaining to learner attendance, attainment and destinations. It describes the progress made by the sixteen pilot education providers in achieving the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, explores the approaches they took to achieving the Benchmarks and considers the barriers and enablers they faced. The impacts of their work in delivering the Gatsby Benchmarks on learners, staff, local stakeholders and national policy and practice are presented. The findings indicate that significant progress in achieving all eight Benchmarks can be made by all kinds of education providers within two years and that this has a significant and observable effect on learners with respect to their career readiness, their interactions with teaching staff and employers, their engagement in the classroom and on attainment.
    • Even extremists have a right to freedom of speech on campus

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (The Conversation Trust (UK), 2014-11-26)
    • The evidence base for careers websites. What works?

      Vigurs, Katy; Everitt, Julia; Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Careers and Enterprise Company, 2017-11-24)
      There is some evidence which suggests that using career websites as part of broader careers education provision can impact positively on young people’s career readiness and the quality and diversity of their social networks for careers purposes. The evidence points to a number of findings which can be turned into lessons for practice. - Information-based career websites need to exist in the context of a wider offline careers support program. They are not a replacement for professional career guidance. - Career websites that provide automated interactions need to be embedded within a wider range of careers support services. Only by doing so can they increase users’ awareness of career support or give users new ideas about careers by exposing them to multimedia resources. - Where career websites are used to facilitate communication (e.g. through online guidance and counselling or through delivery based inside virtual worlds), this can lead to positive outcomes such as gains in career decidedness and self-knowledge, gains in satisfaction with future career prospects, and in career exploration behaviours (such as more frequent career searches). - Career websites need to be integrated into careers education provision and into wider forms of career support (e.g. tutorial support and personal guidance).
    • The evidence base on lifelong guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (The European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN), 2014-10)
      THE PURPOSE OF THIS EVIDENCE GUIDE is to present the existing international research base on the impact of lifelong guidance, including its educational outcomes, economic and employment outcomes, and social outcomes. The guide has been prepared for ELGPN by Professor Tristram Hooley, International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, UK. It builds on the work undertaken by the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) during 2008–14, including the Quality-Assurance and Evidence-Base (QAE) Framework which provides an approach for policy-makers to address quality assurance and evidence-based policy and system development. The guide synthesises the existing impact evidence. It suggests that guidance is most effective when it is conceived as a lifelong system and that policy-makers should continue to develop this evidence base to ensure that policies are based on the best evidence available.
    • The evidence base on lifelong guidance (Brief Summary)

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-10)
      THE PURPOSE OF THIS EVIDENCE GUIDE is to present the existing international research base on the impact of lifelong guidance, including its educational outcomes, economic and employment outcomes, and social outcomes. The guide has been prepared for ELGPN by Professor Tristram Hooley, International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, UK. It builds on the work undertaken by the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) during 2008–14, including the Quality-Assurance and Evidence-Base (QAE) Framework which provides an approach for policy-makers to address quality assurance and evidence-based policy and system development. The guide synthesises the existing impact evidence. It suggests that guidance is most effective when it is conceived as a lifelong system and that policy-makers should continue to develop this evidence base to ensure that policies are based on the best evidence available.
    • The evidence base on lifelong guidance (Extended Summary)

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-10)
      THE PURPOSE OF THIS EVIDENCE GUIDE is to present the existing international research base on the impact of lifelong guidance, including its educational outcomes, economic and employment outcomes, and social outcomes. The guide has been prepared for ELGPN by Professor Tristram Hooley, International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, UK. It builds on the work undertaken by the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) during 2008–14, including the Quality-Assurance and Evidence-Base (QAE) Framework which provides an approach for policy-makers to address quality assurance and evidence-based policy and system development. The guide synthesises the existing impact evidence. It suggests that guidance is most effective when it is conceived as a lifelong system and that policy-makers should continue to develop this evidence base to ensure that policies are based on the best evidence available.
    • Evidence-based teaching in primary education

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (Critical Publishing, 2017-04-03)
      Trainees and school-based practitioners are being encouraged to engage more with evidence-based teaching methods. Teachers are now more responsible for the outcomes of their own practice and are charged with sourcing ‘best practice’ solutions in their pedagogical approaches. And schools are moving more towards in-house professional development approaches that have a clear focus on raising standards in the classroom. This book focuses on how universities and primary schools can work together to lead, manage and sustain a culture of teacher inquiry. It examines the role of the university in providing a critical perspective on teaching and learning and how academics can support schools by working as ‘knowledgeable others’ and advocates of classroom-based research. As a case study, it explores the journey taken by one particular primary school, in partnership with a university, over a two-year period, detailing how this work has impacted on the professional lives of staff, the children they teach, the overall culture of the school and the impact on school improvement. Chapters are contributed by professional school leaders, university academics and primary teachers and there is a focus on the rigorous examination of models of evidenced-based teaching, practical examples demonstrating some of the best and most sustainable approaches, and positive outcomes.
    • Evidence-based teaching: A critical overview for enquiring teachers.

      Philpott, Carey; Poultney, Val; Leeds Beckett University; University of Derby (Critical Publishing, 2018-07-03)
      This book provides a critical overview of evidence-based teaching, with balanced and reflective consideration given to arguments supporting various approaches to increasing the use of evidence in teaching and arguments that raise doubts about, or problems with, these approaches. It offers practical advice on how to implement evidence-based teaching and help with reflectively evaluating its success.
    • Exorcising an ethnography in limbo.

      Vigurs, Katy; University of Derby (Emerald Group Publishing Limited., 2019-01-07)
      I feel haunted; troubled by the ethnography that I conducted some years ago of a new partnership group that was attempting to set up a community learning centre. I’m aware that it doesn’t sound like a particularly alarming research topic, and perhaps that is where some of the issues began. I did not expect an ethnographic haunting to occur. The partnership recruited me less than a year into the creation of the project and I spent two years as a sort of ‘researcher in residence’. The original idea was that I would observe the initial development of the project and then, when the community learning centre was established, I would research the centre’s activities and how they were experienced by village residents. However, fairly soon into the project, problematic dynamics developed within the group, leading to irreconcilable conflict between members. The community learning centre was never established and I was left to piece together an ethnography of a failed partnership. Researching an increasingly dysfunctional partnership was an emotionally exhausting activity, especially when relationships between members became progressively hostile. Managing data collection and analysis at this time was difficult, but I was shocked that, a number of months (and now years) later, revisiting the data for publication purposes remained uncomfortable. I managed to produce my PhD thesis on the back of this study, but I have not felt able to go back to the data, despite there being findings worthy of publication. This ethnography is in a state of limbo and is at risk of becoming lost forever. In this chapter, I explore the reasons for this and discuss lessons learned for future projects.
    • Experiences of education, health and care plans: A survey of parents and young people.

      Adams, Lorna; Tindle, Angus; Basran, Sabrina; Dobie, Sarah; Thomson, Dominic; Robinson, Deborah; Shepherd, Claire; IFF Research; University of Derby (Department for Education, 2017-03)
      An Education, Health and Care plan (EHC plan) sets out the education, health and care support that is to be provided to a child or young person aged 0-25 years who has Special Educational Needs (SEN) or a disability (SEND). It is drawn up by the local authority after an Education, Health and Care (EHC) needs assessment of the child or young person has determined that an EHC plan is necessary, and after consultation with relevant partner agencies and with children, young people and parents. EHC plans, and the needs assessment process through which these are made, were introduced as part of the Children and Families Act 2014. The Act, and an accompanying SEND Code of Practice1, sets out how local authorities must deliver these, including:• Developing and maintaining these collaboratively with children, young people and parents; • Supporting children, young people and parents to participate fully; • Focusing on securing the best possible outcomes for the child/young person; • Enabling participation by relevant partner agencies, to enable joined-up provision.The SEND accountability framework established in 20152 sets out an approach for assessing SEND provision in conjunction with the Act and SEND Code of Practice. The framework provides structure for improving outcomes and experiences for children, young people and their families and, when applied, seeks to show how the system is performing, hold partners to account and support self-improvement. The framework applies at the local and national levels and to independent assessments of the EHC plan process – such as those carried out by Ofsted. In this context, the Department for Education commissioned a survey of parents and young people with an EHC plan, in order to build a representative national (and, where the data allows, local) picture of how parents and young people in England were experiencing the EHC needs assessment and planning process and the resultant EHC plans. The aim was to assess whether delivery of the EHC needs assessments and planning process and the resultant EHC plans reflected the intentions set out in the Children and Families Act 2014 and the accompanying SEND Code of Practice. The findings would help inform the SEND accountability framework.To achieve these aims the survey sought to answer the following questions: • To what extent do children, young people and families experience the EHC needs assessment and planning process as they are intended to be experienced; • How satisfied are children, young people and families with the EHC needs assessment and planning process and the resultant EHC plan; and • To what extent does this vary by local authority and by groups with different characteristics? The findings presented here and throughout the main report explore parents’ and young people’s responses to the survey questions. The report also explores where experiences of the EHC needs assessment and planning process varied for groups with different characteristics, applying a bivariate analysis approach3. The report only highlights such differences where these are statistically significant4.
    • An experiment in blended career development: the University of Derby’s social media internship programme

      Longridge, Debra; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2012-10)
      It is possible to describe the capability of an individual to use the online environment to pursue their career as their digital career literacy. It is comprised of a range of different skills including the ability to: search; evaluate resources; communicate; network with other people; develop your reputation; and utilise an ever growing range of tools and environments as part of your career building. In another article in this edition of the NICEC journal Hooley (2012) has defined digital career literacy as encompassing changing, collecting, critiquing, connecting, communicating, creating and curating. This requires both the translation of offline skills and the development of new online ones. This article sets out the experience of running the social media internship programme (SMIP), an intervention to develop students’ digital career literacy at the University of Derby.