• Understanding the evaluation of access and participation outreach interventions for under 16 year olds.

      Harrison, Neil; Vigurs, Katy; Crockford, Julian; McCaig Colin; Squire, Ruth; Clark, Lewis; University of the West of England; University of Derby; University of Sheffield; Sheffield Hallam University (Office for Students, 2018-12-13)
      The project team was asked to address the following six research questions and these were used to guide the project: 1. What are the intended outcomes for current outreach interventions directed at under 16 year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds where the long-term aim is to widen access to higher education (HE)? 2. What types of outreach intervention activity or activities are institutions using in relation to intended outcomes? 3. What evaluation tools, methods and metrics are being used to measure the intended outcomes? 4. What are the perceived and actual challenges and barriers for different stakeholders to effective evaluation of long-term outreach? 5. What do different stakeholders consider most effective evaluation practice and why? 6. How valid and suitable are the evaluation tools, methods and metrics (identified through the research) that are commonly used? The project was constructed around six interlinked work packages: 1. A quantitative analysis of what higher education providers (HEPs) say about their pre-16 outreach activities (and their evaluation) in their 2017-18 access agreements (as the most recent available). 2. An online survey of HEPs to gather information about the pre-16 outreach activities delivered during the 2016-17 academic year and their evaluation, as well as the structure of their evaluation resources and challenges faced. 3. Case studies of four HEPs identified as demonstrating elements of good practice through their access agreements and the online survey, derived from telephone interviews with key staff and documentary analysis. 4. Telephone interviews with 11 third sector organisations (TSOs) to explore their practices and the evaluation of their activities, providing a counterpoint to the data collected from higher education institutions (HEIs). 5. A synthesis of the four preceding work packages to explore elements of good practice, determine a basis for assessing the quality of evaluations and highlight challenges for the sector and OFFA. 6. An invited participatory workshop for evaluators from HEPs and TSOs identified as demonstrating elements of good practice through the online survey and telephone interviews, to act as a sounding board for the emerging conclusions and recommendations.
    • Understanding the recruitment and selection of postgraduate researchers by English higher education institutions

      Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Metcalfe, Janet; Pearce, Ellen; Hooley, Tristram; CRAC; Vitae; University of Derby (CRAC, 2014-09)
    • Understanding the role of the careers leader.

      The Careers & Enterprise Company; The Careers & Enterprise Company; Gatsby Charitable Foundation (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2018)
      This guide explains what a Careers Leader is and provides advice to schools on how best to identify someone to fill the role. The guide includes key principles and suggestions for developing the role, as well as practical case studies of Careers Leaders already working in schools.
    • Understanding the use of digital technology in the career development sector

      Moore, Nicki; Czerwinska, Karolina; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12-04)
      This research, funded jointly by the UK’s Career Development Institute and the University of Derby, has been conducted at a time of rapid change in the availability and use of digital technologies. A recommendation to develop digital skills to harness technology is not new and was first suggested by The Careers Profession Task Force (2010). This research aims to determine what progress has been made over the last nine years since the recommendation was made and seeks to determine: • How practitioners and managers use digital technology to deliver career development services • The potential for digital technology to deliver career development services; and • The training needs of career development practitioners so that they can use digital technology to deliver services, innovate solutions and solve problems in service delivery. The knowledge developed through this research will be used to develop professional support and training activities and services to organisations and individual career development practitioners. It will also be used by policy makers in the UK and beyond, who are tasked with the development of modern, cost-effective and client appropriate career development services.
    • University Applicant Study: NEMCON.

      Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2017-10-01)
      The interest of the North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network (NEMCON) was to conduct a longitudinal study focusing on the applicant journey from year 12 to enrolment in HE. To do so would enable NEMCON partners to offer new and fresh insight into such themes as: the advice and guidance provided by schools and colleges prior to application; the effectiveness of communications with prospective students before and following offers; the appropriateness of activities and events aimed to inform prospective students of choices and options – in other words, it would aim to find out how young people choose to study where they study. The objectives of the longitudinal study were to gain a better understanding of: • The awareness of the options available to them post 18 and the importance of each • The factors which underpin decisions to attend HE or not • When decision making begins • The relative importance of key advisors; families, friends, schools/teachers, career practitioners • The relative importance of messages they pay attention to and the order in which they are consulted • The effect of institutional branding and reputation on applicant behaviour • How offers are converted into acceptances A longitudinal quantitative design with year 13 students was employed and found that students most often were applying to attend university. Primarily this was because they felt it would help them get a better job and because they were interested in the particular course they were applying for. University open days, websites and prospectuses were the most favoured sources of information although information seeking typically began with UCAS then faculty level information from different institutes. University reputation was important when deciding where to study but the students sampled had applied to both pre and post 1992 universities rather than Russell group or Oxbridge. Small sample sizes prevented the drawing of conclusions about differences in gender, ethnicity and SES. Future research might consider the implications of unconditional offers on decision making and future university attainment.
    • Using Twitter to tackle peripherality? Facilitating networked scholarship for part-time doctoral students within and beyond the university

      Vigurs, Katy (Faculty of Arts, Charles Sturt University, 2016-06-23)
      Feeling part of a community has previously been found to be a motivating factor for part-time doctoral students as well as speeding up doctoral progress. Separately, it has also been suggested that social media usage (specifically Twitter) can encourage the development of interactive academic networks to establish social relations with relevant people beyond the doctoral supervisory team. Drawing on Lave and Wenger’s theory of legitimate peripheral participation, and building particularly on the work of Teeuwsen et al. (2014), this paper suggests that the use of social media in doctoral education can be one way for part-time doctoral students to migrate from a position of academic peripherality to one of legitimate peripheral participation in a wider research community. This paper investigates the use of social media for academic purposes by three different groups of part-time doctoral students. It explores the ways in which Twitter might be used to help part-time doctoral students feel part of the research community both within a University and the wider research community beyond. It also identifies some of the barriers and limitations to achieving this. Finally, the paper raises questions about the roles and responsibilities of supervisors and other faculty members in relation to using social media to support the learning of part-time doctoral students.
    • Visions, dreams and reality: The limited possibilities for level 1 post-16 students

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (01/09/2007)
      This paper discusses the findings of a study exploring the aspirations and learning identities of 3 groups of level 1 students in 2 English Further Education (FE) colleges. It gives a brief description of the methodology employed and an overview of each of the three groups. It then summarises the findings from the data, to provide a context for the discussion which considers the key themes arising from the study. Drawing on the data and on relevant literature, the paper goes on to explore the positioning of these young people in the context of class and gender stereotypes, their aspirations and developing identities.
    • ‘We wanted to change that particular part of the world': the role of academics in the career development field, learning from the career of Tony Watts

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Journal of the National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2014-10)
      This article uses a career case-study with Tony Watts to explore the interface of an academic career with policy and practice. It finds that, in Tony’s case, public engagement was driven by a social and political mission. Such engagement is shaped by both the institutional arrangements within which the academic is situated and the political and organisational structures of the part of the world into which they try to intervene. While it is difficult to generalise from a single case, the article concludes by suggesting some key themes which academics may wish to attend to in navigating these issues of engagement and the nature of academic roles.
    • What can careers workers learn from the study of narrative?

      Hooley, Tristram; Rawlinson, Mark; University of Derby (NICEC, 2011-02)
    • What do students want? Listening to the voices of young jobseekers

      Institute of Student Employers; Debut; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers & Debut, 2020-09)
      This research poses a series of seven big questions asked by employers and allows over 2000 students and jobseekers to answer these questions. It is based on surveys conducted in June and July 2020 in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. It looks at students and jobseekers experience of the jobs market and recruitment process.
    • What is online research?: using the Internet for Social Science research

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Wellens, Jane; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2012-06)
      Online research is perhaps the most obvious but also the most difficult of research methods. What is Online Research? is a straightforward, accessible introduction to social research online. The book covers the key issues and concerns for all social scientists, with sections on research design, ethics and good practice. Short, clear case studies are used throughout to allow students to see examples of the research in practice. Wide ranging and interdisciplinary, What is Online Research Methods? shows researchers how to engage in the online environment in innovative ways, and points the way forward for future research.
    • What is the impact of University work-based learning for early year's practitioners in Norway and England? Examples of processes, outcomes and impact from the undertaking of work-based projects

      Atkins, Liz; Furu, Anne; Heslop, Kay; Kaarby, Karen Marie; Lindboe, Inger Marie; Mpofu-Currie, Lucy; Northumbria University (Open University, 01/02/2018)
      This paper is focused on partnership work between academics in Norway and England involved in the teaching of university and work-based learning programmes. Initiated four years ago, the collaboration has developed into a community of practice involving a range of shared activities. These activities include academic and student exchanges, nursery visits, seminars and workshops, which culminate in a joint conference presentation. This paper explores the cultural and curricula differences between the two programmes, and considers how these impact on the individual practitioners undertaking them and on the settings in which they work. The data draws on four students' experiences to exemplify learning in a work-based context. Ethical issues were addressed in a manner consistent with the British Education Research Association (BERA) (2011) guidelines for educational research, and the study utilised theoretical frameworks that drew on concepts of work-based learning (e.g. Colley et al., 2003). Findings suggest that, despite the significant differences in culture and curricula approach, both programmes appear to enhance the practice of practitioners in early years. Key impacts of the programme included evidence of personal change and professional development (Mpofu-Currie, 2015), which were reflective of democratic rather than instrumental notions of professionalism (Atkins and Tummons, 2017). There was also evidence of significant gains in knowledge, manifested through improved pedagogy and more meaningful engagement with the children in each setting. This work demonstrates the benefits of knowledge exchange and dialogue to promote cross-cultural learning experiences. The authors hope that it will inform the development of innovative work-based learning programmes and wider policy in relation to work-based learning, as well as knowledge transfer between Norway and England.
    • What works? The evidence base for teacher CPD delivered by employers.

      Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-12-04)
      Teacher continuing professional development (CPD) delivered by employers can refer to a variety of professional development activities where an employer is the primary facilitator of training. But what impact do teacher placements have and what can we learn about lessons in best practice? This paper provides an overview of the evidence for teacher continuing professional development (CPD) provided by employers with the aim of clarifying possible impacts and identifying effective best practice.
    • Why higher apprenticeships are critical to business

      Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (Open Access Government, 2019-09-06)
    • Why important education research often gets ignored

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (The Conversation Trust (UK), 2014-10-16)
    • Why we need to share our ideas about connecting career development to social justice

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (CERIC, 2021-01)
      An article introducing key ideas of social justice in career guidance.
    • Why we've all got to be digital career practitioners

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2015)
      This article discusses effective strategies for career development on the internet.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-12)
      This Concept Note discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways: • Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation. • Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in workbased learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability. • Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within work-based learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies across Europe

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; Social Service Agency of Georgia; University of Derby (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 2016-09)
      This paper is a re-presentation of work undertaken for the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network on work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies which discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways:  Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation.  Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in work-based learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability.  Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within workbased learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • A workforce development strategy for the Adult Career Information, Advice and Guidance workforce in England

      Neary, Siobhan; Jackson, Heather; University of Derby (Lifelong Learning UK (LLUK), 2010-03)
      This paper outlines Lifelong Learning UK’s approach to the development of a Workforce Development Strategy for the adult career information, advice and guidance workforce in England. Lifelong Learning UK, the independent employer-led sector skills council (SSC) with strategic responsibility for the workforce development of staff working in the lifelong learning sector, brought adult career information, advice and guidance (CIAG) into its footprint in April 2009, thereby providing all employers within the adult CIAG sector in England with the opportunity to engage with a strategic UK wide perspective for workforce planning and development.