• What works? The evidence base for teacher CPD delivered by employers.

      Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-12-04)
      Teacher continuing professional development (CPD) delivered by employers can refer to a variety of professional development activities where an employer is the primary facilitator of training. But what impact do teacher placements have and what can we learn about lessons in best practice? This paper provides an overview of the evidence for teacher continuing professional development (CPD) provided by employers with the aim of clarifying possible impacts and identifying effective best practice.
    • Why higher apprenticeships are critical to business

      Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (Open Access Government, 2019-09-06)
    • Why important education research often gets ignored

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (The Conversation Trust (UK), 2014-10-16)
    • Why we've all got to be digital career practitioners

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2015)
      This article discusses effective strategies for career development on the internet.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-12)
      This Concept Note discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways: • Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation. • Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in workbased learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability. • Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within work-based learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies across Europe

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; Social Service Agency of Georgia; University of Derby (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 2016-09)
      This paper is a re-presentation of work undertaken for the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network on work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies which discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways:  Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation.  Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in work-based learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability.  Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within workbased learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • A workforce development strategy for the Adult Career Information, Advice and Guidance workforce in England

      Neary, Siobhan; Jackson, Heather; University of Derby (Lifelong Learning UK (LLUK), 2010-03)
      This paper outlines Lifelong Learning UK’s approach to the development of a Workforce Development Strategy for the adult career information, advice and guidance workforce in England. Lifelong Learning UK, the independent employer-led sector skills council (SSC) with strategic responsibility for the workforce development of staff working in the lifelong learning sector, brought adult career information, advice and guidance (CIAG) into its footprint in April 2009, thereby providing all employers within the adult CIAG sector in England with the opportunity to engage with a strategic UK wide perspective for workforce planning and development.
    • Workforce needs of the career development sector in the UK

      Neary, Siobhan; Priestley, Peter; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (Career Development Institute University of Derby, 2018-11-01)
      The research utilised an online survey circulated widely through the networks of both organisations. Responses were received from 59 employing organisations, representing the four countries in the UK. 64% of responses came from larger career providers employing more than 40 staff. The respondents represented employers providing services to young people, adults, all-age, FE and a small number of HE providers. The research presents a snap shot in time which suggests that pay and conditions, geography and access to affordable training are impacting on the skills and capability of the sector. Recruitment issues, ageing workforce and technology are perceived as the greatest challenges to the career development field at the present.
    • You're hired! Graduate career handbook: Maximise your employability and get a graduate job

      Hooley, Tristram; Grant, Korin; University of Derby; Loughborough University (Crimson and Trotman, 2017)
      You’re Hired! Graduate Career Handbook is the complete guide to career planning and job hunting for students and graduates, offering vital guidance on how to discover your potential, maximise your employability, and kick-start your career.  The book is organised in simple chapters designed to help you address the various issues you experience as you move through university and into work, uniquely starting from your first year at uni and taking you through to your first days at work and beyond. Topics include: self-reflection, career planning, job research, networking, recruitment practices, employability skills, making the most of your degree, postgraduate study, Plan B, and how to make a good first impression at work and build your career over time. Whether you have your heart set on a particular job, have a few ideas about possible lines of work, or simply don’t know where to start, this book is for you. If you know what you want to do, it offers vital guidance on how to achieve your ambition and land your dream job; if you don’t have a clue, it will help you work out what your next step should be.  With handy tips, checklists and real-life examples throughout, this guide will help you to supercharge your career and get the graduate job you want!
    • The Youth Guarantee and lifelong guidance

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; National Labour Office, Hungary; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2013-10)
      The European Youth Guarantee is an initiative to help link young people aged 16 - 14 to the labour market across all member states. The paper is a Concept Note commissioned by the policy network to explore how guidance activities are being implemented in a range of ways across national youth support programmes and includes practical evidence from 17 member countries. The paper contends that successful and sustainable implementation of the Youth Guarantee Initiative can only be secured through effective integration of lifelong guidance practice into national programmes.
    • Youth transitions, VET and the making of class: changing theorisations for changing times?

      Atkins, Liz; Avis, James; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 19/07/2017)
      The paper places youth transitions and VET within the global policy context in which economic competiveness is hegemonic. It compares research from the 1970s/80s, which explored young peoples lived experiences of VET and youth training schemes with contemporary work on similar themes. It argues that there are continuities and discontinuities in the conditions that young people face in their transitions to waged labour. Continuities can be seen in constructions of working class youth, but also by the way in which policy views the economy as characterised by upskilling. This is called into question when set against the existence of significant numbers of low waged, low skilled jobs in the English economy. There are also discontinuities that are the result of changes in class and employment structures. As a result precariousness has become ubiquitous with this existing in tandem with labour that is surplus to the requirements of capital. The paper re-considers youth transitions and re-evaluates the notion of serendipity, suggesting these concepts need to be rethought and reworked in current conditions.
    • Youth Transitions, VET and the ‘making’ of class: changing theorisations for changing times?

      Avis, James; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Taylor & Francis, 2017-07-19)
      The paper places youth transitions and vocational education and training (VET) within the global policy context in which economic competiveness is hegemonic. It compares research from the 1970s/80s, which explored young peoples’ lived experiences of VET and youth training schemes with contemporary work on similar themes. It argues that there are continuities and discontinuities in the conditions that young people face in their transitions to waged labour. Continuities can be seen in constructions of working class youth, but also by the way in which policy views the economy as characterised by upskilling. This is called into question when set against the existence of significant numbers of low-waged, low-skilled jobs in the English economy. There are also discontinuities that are the result of changes in class and employment structures. As a result, precariousness has become ubiquitous, with this existing in tandem with labour that is surplus to the requirements of capital. The paper reconsiders youth transitions and re-evaluates the notion of serendipity, suggesting these concepts need to be rethought and reworked in current conditions.
    • Youth, migration and identity in Cuba since 1959

      Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-15)
      In Cuba, the issue of migration cannot be disaggregated from the relationship with the US and, specifically, the issues of migration from socialist Cuba to its larger neighbour. Such migration is an important element of the political relationship between the two countries, but is also a key factor in the definition of Cuban identity. This chapter will present two case studies of the intersection of migration and youth in Cuba after 1959 and will explore the relationship between these cases and the contemporary polemic on migration. The relationship between island-based Cubans and the Cuban diaspora and very notion of national identity and the right to self-define as Cuban are woven into narratives of international relations as the intimate level of family relations come into contact (and conflict) with high politics. Young Cubans experience migration not only as migrants but also from the island where such migration has become part of the Cuban imagined identity. The repeated moral panics over young people who do not work or study over the Revolutionary period coupled with the heightened focus on young people as key agents in the revolutionary process creates a specific set of circumstances which allow for a definition of Cuban identity which is fluid and in flux, but which, given the new (though fragile) reality of a closer relationship with the USA, has sought and continues to seek to incorporate migration into a reflective understanding of the revolutionary process.