• ISE Annual Student Recruitment Survey 2018

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2018)
      This paper sets out the findings of the Institute of Student Employers 2018 recruitment survey.
    • The ISE Pulse Survey 2020: Taking the temperature of the graduate labour market.

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-02)
      This report sets out the findings of the ISE Pulse Survey 2020
    • 'It all kind of symbolises something doesn't it?' How students present their career image online.

      Hooley, Tristram; Cutts, Beth; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2018-04-04)
      It has become common to share images of yourself online. There is evidence that employers are using these images as part of selection decisions. This article presents a research project which explored these issues with current undergraduates. It found that students had a clear understanding of what a professional online career image would look like, but that this was not reflected in the images that they shared. However, students were careful and considered in the images that they did share; they just did not want employers looking at them. For careers professionals this situation presents an ethical challenge as to how far we want to curb students’ online identities to ensure their employability.
    • 'It helps to have more strings to your bow’. Exploring the careers and success of graduates of the conservatoire for dance and drama

      Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Hooley, Tristram; CRAC / Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (CRAC, 2020-10)
      This report sets out the findings of a project exploring the careers pursued by the graduates from the Conservatoire of Dance and Drama. It finds that CDD graduates are positive about their experience of studying at the Conservatoire and that they frequently go on to paid work linked to their degree discipline. However, the experience of work for these graduates is likely to be of a portfolio career which links together a range of different jobs.
    • Its in their nature to nurture: a comparison of PCE mentors perception of their role and the emerging national requirements

      Wallace, Sue; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (01/09/2006)
      This paper explores the ways in which subject specialist mentors perceive their role and thereby their professional development needs - in terms of their responsibility for the observation of teaching practice in post-compulsory education settings. It suggests that their role as the mentors perceive it is not consistent with, or limited to, that which is implied in the emerging model of post-compulsory teacher training. Its findings further suggest that the training available for professionals undertaking this largely unpaid role is both limited and variable and that there is minimal engagement with the support which is available. The paper argues that a lack of coherence has led to an inequitable situation where students on post-compulsory Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses receive variable support which impacts on their student experience and professional development. The investigation, based on a range of initiatives, resources and approaches developed during 2005/2006 as part of a DfES pilot study involving Nottingham Trent University (NTU), Lincoln College and Stamford College, makes recommendations for developments in local and national practice, and in government policy.
    • Jetting off on another flying faculty visit: what have we learned?

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (BERA, 2018-01-31)
      The increased demand for education as a tradable commodity has seen a growing number of international students seeking UK qualifications over the past decade (OECD, 2009). It is becoming commonplace for universities to have their programmes delivered ‘off-site’ by a teaching team of academics who make regular trips abroad, often at great distance, to teach international cohorts for intensive periods of time. This is commonly known as ‘flying faculty’, and research into this phenomenon has revealed that it is anything but a holiday in the sun. Smith (2014) found that there were four areas UK academics needed to consider when preparing to undertake such work. Issues around quality assurance of the programme. The teaching and learning practices of the department/faculty. The professional development of the academics. The challenges of undertaking this type of work.
    • The Kent model of career education and guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Kent County Council, 2015-05)
    • Know your mean from your median

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-01)
      Tristram Hooley took over the helm for ISE research last year. Here he delves into our annual student recruitment survey to explore the number of applications per hire and how it should be interpreted.
    • Labour market information and social justice: a critical examination

      Staunton, Tom; Rogosic, Karla; University of Derby (Springer, 2021-03-04)
      Labour Market Information forms a central place in career practice and how individuals enact their careers. This paper makes use of Alvesson and Sandberg’s (Constructing research questions: doing interesting research. Sage, Thousand Oaks, 2013) methodology of focussing research on theoretical assumptions to construct a critical literature review on the relationship between Labour Market Information and career guidance. This paper presents six theoretical conceptions from the career literature: Contact, Rationalism, Nomad, Adaptability, Constructivist and Social Justice. We will argue for the need to move towards more constructivist understandings of Labour Market Information as well understandings linked to more critical understandings of the labour market.
    • The Language of SEND: Implications for the SENCO

      Codina, Geraldene; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester (Routledge, 2021-04-22)
      The central tenet of this chapter is that language matters. Over the centuries as human beings have represented and categorised both themselves and others in different ways, so interpretations and the language of disability (physical and learning) shape-shifts altering through time (Goodey, 2016). The language of disability and the societal and political values which underpin it are therefore not cross-historical – let two or three generations pass and the labels associated with disability alter. Sometimes such changes in language usage can seem little more than semantic fashion or a professional challenge to keep up-to-date with. The language of disability is however more than fashion and political correctness (Mallett and Slater, 2014), for words gain their meaning from the manner in which they are used (Wittgenstein, 2009). This chapter argues the language of special education shapes SENCOs’ values, expectations, assumptions, responses and practice. Through an exploration of historical and current language usage, this chapter analyses the language of special education and the implications for the school community.
    • Leadership and ministry, lay and ordained: Insights from rural multi-church groups

      Weller, Paul; Artess, Jane; Sahar, Arif; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-07)
      This report examines and explores leadership challenges and opportunities in the setting of Christian ministry and witness within the rural multi-church context. The challenges arise from a combination of demographic and socio-economic challenges coupled with inherited building, operational structures and patterns of ordained ministry. It utilises in-depth literature review, semi-structured interviews and a mapping of training provision to establish the challenges and opportunities for rural multi-church contexts. A lack of confidence was identified as the biggest barrier in encouraging clergy and lay people to look at ministry and witness new ways to engage in learning and development opportunities. It is recognised that a one-size-fits all approach is not appropriate but consideration needs to be given to the extension of formal training courses at local level, short modular approaches and the informal approaches such as mentoring.
    • Leading career management (CMS) in Europe

      Neary, Siobhan; Bujok, Ella; Mosley, Stella; University of Derby; CASCAID; da Vinci Community School (The Career Development Institute, 2017-04)
      iCeGS at the University of Derby together with CASCAID are working with a number of European partners to develop a career management skills (CMS) framework. The article presents the pilots in the UK that are testing out elements of the framework with year 10 students, mature students and post 16 level 1. Project outcomes will be disseminated at an international conference in Summer 2017.
    • Leading change for survival: the rural flexi-school approach

      Poultney, Val; Anderson, Duncan; University of Derby (BELMAS, 2019-08-19)
      Nestled in the Staffordshire moorlands, a small rural school appointed a Head Teacher, who also served as teacher, for a school community of 5 children in 2010. Shortly afterwards, the school was earmarked for closure. Passionate for the school to remain open, the Head Teacher sought to adopt a flexi-schooling approach. The school is now at capacity with just under 50 children, most of whom have previously been home educated or school refusers. Carnie (2017) describes flexi-schooling as an agreed contract and partnership whereby the school and family agree responsibilities for the education of the children concerned. It is characterised in part by there being no unique location for education. Parents, according to Neuman & Guterman (2019) are important and active participants in the education of their children. They have a clear educational role working in close collaboration and partnership with the school, where the home environment is central to the teaching process
    • Leading change for survival: The rural flexi-school approach

      Poultney, Val; Anderson, Duncan; University of Derby (Sage, 2019-10-08)
      This article seeks to present the perspectives of three school leaders in one rural primary school in the English East Midlands, who, when faced with closure due to a falling student numbers, decided to offer and operate a flexi-schooling model of educational provision. We aim to find out, through a theoretical model of systems school leadership, how the school leadership team addressed this issue. Findings suggest that the principles of systems leadership, operating through an open systems model, have facilitated the journey towards flexi-schooling and ensured the survival and growth of the school. The learning community created with parents and the personalisation of the curriculum for learners reflects an innovative curriculum design and in part solves the problems which led to the initial decision taken by parents to home-educate. Focusing on ways to secure healthy student numbers, school leaders developed a partnership with a multi-academy trust, yet they still face challenges in formally recording student numbers when their attendance is only part of the week
    • Leading the flying faculty.

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby; Institute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Sage, 2017-11-23)
      This article employs a reflexive methodology to critically examine the opportunities and challenges raised for a leader of a UK EdD programme when the home institution undertakes short periods of intensive teaching abroad – a model known as ‘flying faculty’. The University of Derby had, until 2010–11, a large institutional partnership with Israel via its own Inter-College and UK EdD programme. Academics from the UK made regular trips abroad to teach and tutor doctoral students, working alongside an Israel-based professor. This article identifies two key leadership themes arising from this type of work. The first is related to an academic team working abroad under pressure to deliver an intensive course in a short time period. The second theme looks at issues of sustainability of an EdD programme in this context, namely the maintenance of productive working relationships with the local professor and student cohorts over distance and protracted time of study.
    • Learning on the margins: Experiencing low level VET programmes in a UK context

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (AVETRA, 23/04/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context
    • Learning rounds: What potential for teacher Inquiry?

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (Leeds Beckett University Carnegie School of Education, 2018-11)
      Back in 2015 I began work with a primary school in Derby City that was under Special Measures. It was the beginning of a school-university partnership that was to last for over two years. During that time the staff were given the opportunity to ‘research’ and collect evidence related to problematic areas of their practice. Looking back at this work which was eventually published Poultney, 2017), I began to wonder just what ‘research’ had really meant in this primary school context and what these teachers had gained from their experience of collecting evidence, arriving at solutions to their teaching problems, telling other teachers about their findings and writing their chapters for this book. Many of the contributors to the book have since taken up promoted roles, been confident enough to speak at various conferences and make contribution to many professional events since then. Over the time we spent together these teachers have developed a confident ‘critical eye’ and the ability to ask insightful ask about practice. Day (2017) refers this as the establishment of ‘human capital’ which is likely to engender trust and a sense of individual and collective well-being which will motivate teachers to engage in activities directly related to raising school standards.
    • Learning to be employable.

      Artess, Jane; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-07-26)
      This chapter presents findings about the relationship between Futuretrack respondents' participation in employability-related activitites and indicators of their subsequent job satisfaction, optimism about their long-term career prospects and skills development.
    • Let’s talk about career guidance in secondary schools! A consideration of the professional capital of school staff in Ireland and England

      Hearne, Lucy; Neary, Siobhan; University of Limerick; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-03-27)
      The delivery of a comprehensive career guidance service in secondary schools through the whole school model that equips students with requisite career learning and development competencies has garnered credence in recent years. This article deliberates on the current situation of this type of provision in secondary schools in Ireland and England and the implications for professional practice in both countries. Specifically, it considers the conditions that could support the delivery of a whole school approach to career guidance through the concept of professional capital.
    • Level 1 Vocational Learning: Predestination disguised as opportunity

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (03/09/2008)
      UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level (1 and 2) vocational programmes in Colleges of Further Education tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). They are the focus of multiple initiatives in the context of the 14-19 agenda as attempts are made to solve a perceived problem by providing routes through a range of vocational opportunitieswhich will allegedly enable them to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper attempts to problematise the notion of opportunity, arguing that the rhetoric of opportunity which permeates Government documents is merely a deception perpetrated on those young people whose positioning in education and society prevents them from questioning it. The paper discusses the little stories(Griffiths, 2003:81) of Emma, Leonardo, Paris, Rea and Amir, five young people who participated in a recent empirical study exploring the lives and transitions of level 1 students. Whilst acknowledging that the young people discussed in this paper are a small sample, their stories are typical of the 31 young people who participated in the study, and are also reflective of both the exclusionary characteristics experienced by the wider group and of their hopes, dreams and aspirations for the future. The paper uses their stories to illustrate the significant limitations of the opportunitiesoffered to young people, arguing that in many cases these are limited to an extended transition, moving from one low level vocational programme to the next. It finds that, whilst apparently buying into lifelong learning and notions of a knowledge society, the young people are rejecting such opportunities,together with their perceived civic responsibility of engaging in lifelong learning, as they draw on whatever capital they have available to them in an attempt to make the transition from education to the world of work. Four of the young people in this study were, or had been, engaged in employment concurrent with their level 1 programme. Whilst this could all be described as low pay, low skill employment some, such as working with children, carried significant responsibility. Three of these young people made a decision to move from education into the world of work at or before the end of their level 1 programme. The paper argues that in context of a low level vocational programme a decision to move into low pay, low skill employment might be regarded as a rational choice since it exchanges immediate financial capital, albeit at a low level, for a vague, insubstantial promise of something better at the end of a much extended transition. The paper goes on to conclude that these young people, despite the high aspirations reflected in their stories, are structurally positioned, partly inevitably, to make choices that are not their own, and to be denied the kind of opportunity which might enable them to achieve their aspirations. Instead, they are predestined to be engaged in low level, busyactivities rather than learning in preparation for low pay, low skill employment. Finally, the paper raises questions about the morality of a Government education policy which creates and perpetuates institutional and societal structures and barriers which effectively deny opportunity to so many young people.