• The Saudi experiment with career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Sense Publishing, 2017-04)
      Saudi Arabia has recently embarked on an ambitious experiment with career guidance. The country has identified that career guidance offers a range of potential cultural, educational and economic benefits. These include supporting the Saudisation of the workforce, the development of the vocational education system and the engagement of the Saudi ‘youth bulge’ in the labour market and wider society. However, the country has a weak tradition of career guidance and a need to develop new policies and systems rapidly. The Saudi Ministry of Labour has driven the development of the country’s new career guidance system and has sought to learn from global best practice. However, Saudi Arabia offers a very different context from those where career guidance has flourished. Particularly distinctive features of Saudi society include its limited civil society, the central role that religion plays, the place of women, the role of oil within the economy and the high level of migrant workers in the labour market. Taken together these issues offer challenges of culture, theory, policy and practice. Negotiating these challenges and building an organic body of theory and practice will be critical to the success or otherwise of the Saudi experiment with career guidance.
    • Schools and employers must work together.

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Kemps Publishing Ltd., 2018-06)
      This article explores the changing nature of work, the history of apprenticeships and the challenges for both young people and employers in getting the right people in the right jobs.
    • 'The self-improving primary school': understanding and approaching teacher inquiry: a pilot study.

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2016)
      This paper examines how one primary school in the East Midlands region has worked to establish a culture of teacher-led, evidence-based teacher inquiry. It reports on a pilot year of research when the senior leadership team (SLT) decided to implement a strategic focus on evidence-based teaching, which would generate their own school knowledge, equip teachers to take more responsibility for their own teaching and professional development and to broaden their local and national networks. The SLT led the inquiry process using various initiatives as suggested vehicles for inquiry with the aim of galvanising teaching staff into making changes to their pedagogical approaches. Working with a local HEI academic as supporter of this process and advisor to the Head teacher, appropriate practice-based methodologies were deployed, trialled, role-modelled and evaluated by the SLT. A local HEI academic advised the SLT on the implementation of this approach, which was followed up by a small scale piece of research and evaluation to further inform the evidence base.
    • SENCO induction pack: Supporting you at the start of your journey

      Whatton, Julie; Codina, Geraldene; Middleton, Tristan; Esposito, Rosanne; Department for Education; NASEN (Whole School SEND/DfE/LLSENDCiC/nasen, 2019-04)
      This induction pack has been designed by SENCOs for SENCOs as a useful reference tool that can be used from day one of undertaking this important role. It can be a valuable asset to both new and experienced professionals alike and we would recommend it to all SENCOs. We understand that the role is context-specific and so, instead of trying to prescribe a single approach, this induction pack sets out the key operational considerations so that SENCOs can make more informed decisions. This SENCO Induction Pack has been developed by Leading Learning for SEND Community Interest Company as part of a suite of resources developed by the Whole School SEND Consortium3, hosted by nasen4, to embed good SEND provision in schools. This project was funded by the Department for Education. As such, the induction pack includes references to a broad range of organisations, resources and documents from across the SEND community. This is in keeping with one of the wider principles of Whole School SEND, which is to maximise the use of existing resources to save schools time and money.
    • Smoke and mirrors: Opportunity and aspiration in 14-19 education

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (01/03/2010)
      The policy discourse around those young people who are the focus of the 14-19 agenda is one of negativity which, in its use of language such as non-academic, disaffected, disadvantaged places young people firmly within a deficit model. This model frames these young people as low achievers with low aspirations, routinely dismisses them as non-academic yet claims to offer opportunities in the form of a vocational education which, according to the rhetoric, will lead to a lifelong (nirvana?) of high skill, high paid work, personal satisfaction and opportunity (providing they continue to engage in lifelong learning), something which many young people take on trust. Drawing on original empirical research, and working within a framework informed by Marxist and social justice concepts, this paper contests the assumption that these young people have low aspirations, arguing that falling within a deficit model, constrained by discourses of negativity, powerless to change a system which militates against them and lacking the agency for change their chances of achieving those aspirations are almost non-existent. The paper poses a number of questions: What are 'high' and 'low' aspirations? What is 'non academic'? Why, every year, are nearly half of all young people characterized in this way? What is, or is not, an 'opportunity'? It argues that notions of opportunity are, in fact, smoke and mirrors, a massive deception which enables the channelling of these young people into the low pay, low skill work market in readiness to fulfil government demands for cheap labour as and when it is needed. Finally, it concludes with proposals for change in the 14-19 and PCET systems which could provide a more equitable and effective framework for young people to achieve their hopes and dreams.
    • Social class

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (Oxford University Press, 01/01/2009)
      Education is of relevance to everyone but it involves a specialised vocabulary and terminology which may be opaque or unfamiliar to those new to the field. The new UK-focused Dictionary of Education provides clear and concise definitions for 1,250 terms, from A* to zero tolerance, that anyone studying education or working in the field is likely to encounter. Coverage includes all sectors of education: pre-school, primary, secondary, further and higher education, special needs, adult and continuing education, and work-based learning. It also includes major legislation, key figures andorganisations, and national curriculum and assessment terminology. The dictionary features entry-level weblinks, a timeline summary of landmark educational legislation since 1945 and a glossary of acronyms. In addition, there is a useful, fully cross-referenced section of comparative terms used in the US, Canada, Australia, and South Africa. This up-to-date and authoritative dictionary is essential for all students of education, teachers, and lecturers ondevelopment programmes, and it is strongly recommended for governors, classroom assistants, and parents.
    • Social control in practice: the impact of learning employability skills

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (03/04/2012)
      This paper explores notions of employabilityin further education, a concept which is at the basis of much government policy associated with marginalised learners. Drawing on earlier empirical work by Atkins (2009) Atkins et al (2010) and Simmons and Thompson (2011) and working within a framework informed by Marxist concepts of Power and control, the paper problematises the term employability, arguing that in policy terms the term is ill-defined yet associated with a positive rhetoric about high pay, skill work which is in tension with the prospects of the marginalised group of students at whom it is directed. Despite the rhetoric, most employability programmes are far removed from the genuine work experienceadvocated by Wolf (2011:130). They offer little in the way of conceptual knowledge or exchange value, but are resonant with earlier concerns about the structure of vocational PCET programmes as producing users who are socialised to work, rather than as citizens (Tarrant, 2001). The paper argues that employability prgrammes are little more than an exercise in social control which are productive of false hope that engagement with them will offer a route into high pay, high skill employment with the prospect of financial and career security. The paper concludes that this hope obscures the reality that such programmes at best may lead to low pay, low skill work and, at worst, form another stage in the churnof young people who are NEET (not in education, employment or training). The impact of such programmes is unlikely, therefore, to be one of progression to high pay, high skill careers, but rather to be one of class and labour (re) production as students are socialised into particular forms of casual and low pay, low skill employment.
    • Social media, social justice? Consideration from a career development perspective

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC) and CDI, 2016-04-01)
      Inside the overall context of careers development, this article will explore how social media relates to social justice through exploring two contrasting perspectives. Firstly we will consider the potential of social media to enhance social justice by democratising social life and so address inequalities related to career development. We will secondly consider if social media develops new forms of inequalities in the forms of the network it creates which harm the progression of social justice. It will be argued that these two perspectives coexist, presenting social media as both disrupting and intensifying inequality in society. This will be particularly highlighted through attaching these positions to different schools of thought related to social capital.
    • Social media: a guide for researchers

      Cann, Alan; Dimitriou, Konstantia; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Research Information Network, 2011)
      This guide has been produced by the International Centre for Guidance Studies, and aims to provide the information needed to make an informed decision about using social media and select from the vast range of tools that are available. One of the most important things that researchers do is to find, use and disseminate information, and social media offers a range of tools which can facilitate this. The guide discusses the use of social media for research and academic purposes and will not be examining the many other uses that social media is put to across society. Social media can change the way in which you undertake research, and can also open up new forms of communication and dissemination. It has the power to enable researchers to engage in a wide range of dissemination in a highly efficient way.
    • Social pedagogy: a scoping project for Derbyshire County Council; summary report

      Moore, Nicki; Jakhara, Mohammed; Bowie, John; Marriott, John; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-06)
      Derbyshire County Council (DCC) is committed to promoting positive outcomes for children and young people who are ‘Looked After’. The Authority has found that promoting a social pedagogical approach appears to have a positive impact for stakeholders. In autumn 2012 representatives from DCC’s Children and Younger Adults department met with a team of University of Derby staff from the faculty of Education Health and Sciences (EHS) to discuss the potential to further promote and embed social pedagogy into the daily worng practice of DCC staff and carers. It was agreed that an initial research project to ascertain the potential for training in social pedagogy for DCC employees was a necessary component for achieving this aim. The project involved a range of research approaches including a desk based review of literature, a number of face to face, telephone and group interviews, and an online survey. In total 209 Individuals participated in the research including managers, practitioners and foster carers. This report presents a summary of the findings of the research including a number of options and recommendations for developing an approach to teaching and training the County’s children and young people’s workforce in this aspect of their professional practice.
    • Spatial justice – the final frontier for diversity and inclusion?

      Ball, Charlie; Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-01)
    • State of the Nation 2017. Careers and enterprise provision in England’s schools

      Boys, Jonathan; Hooley, Tristram; The Careers & Enterprise Company (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-10-10)
      This report describes the careers and enterprise provision in secondary schools in England in the academic year 2016/2017. It is based on responses from 578 secondary schools gathered through the Compass self-assessment tool. It provides the most comprehensive picture of schools’ careers and enterprise provision ever collected and allows us to see how schools are performing in relation to the standard set by the Gatsby Benchmarks. The scope of the data is broadly comparable with data collected as part of the original Gatsby Good Career Guidance research in 2014 allowing us to see how provision has changed over time.
    • Statutory guidance for Further Education and Sixth Form Colleges : Careers England Policy Commentary 22.

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-06)
      This is the twenty-second in an occasional series of briefing notes produced for Careers England on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. This briefing note describes and provides context for the latest Statutory Guidance for Further Education and Sixth Form Colleges.
    • Tackling unemployment, supporting business and developing careers

      Hooley, Tristram; Devins, David; Watts, A. G.; Hutchinson, Jo; Marriott, John; Walton, Fiona; University of Derby, iCeGS; Leeds Metropolitan University, Policy Research Institute (PRI) (UKCES, 2012-05)
      The issue of unemployment remains high on the political agenda. However, there is evidence that employers can be wary of employing people who are out of work. Employer practice is key, both in terms of providing employment opportunities to job seekers, and in providing space for low-skilled people to develop their skills and cement their attachment to the labour market. This report discusses the role of career guidance in mediating between job seekers and employers to allow both to achieve their objectives.
    • Talking about career: the language used by and with young people to discuss life, learning and work

      Moore, Nicki; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby, iCeGS (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2012-04-25)
      This report describes the findings of research conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby on behalf of the national HE STEM programme. The research set out to understand how young people conceptualise career vocabulary in order to help those tasked with supporting their career decision making to do so in a way which was both engaging and effective. The research found that there is considerable confusion about a range of career vocabulary both amongst young people themselves and between young people and the adults who seek to influence and inform their careers. This report has also argued that confusion about vocabulary cannot simply be solved by teaching young people the “correct” meaning of different words. The report explores the relationship between the words that we use to talk about career and the way that we think about career. In particular it examines how the different vocabulary and conceptions of career held by young people and adults complicate the career learning that takes place both in school and outside of school. The report notes that current policy suggests that schools are going to have to take increasing levels of control over careers education and a key element of this is supporting teachers and other adults working with young people to talk more effectively about careers and related issues. The report argues that it is important that career educators attend to the career literacy levels of learners and pay close attention to the career vocabularies that they utilise. In particular an argument is made that those young people who are considering STEM careers have additional vocabulary and concepts to learn that relate to the disciplines and sectors within which STEM careers are pursued. The report explores how people talk about career and identifies a range of factors that are likely to influence this. It demonstrates that there is considerable diversity in the ways in which people define and use a word like “career”. It notes that people often use metaphors to describe the concept of career and identifies a wide range of different metaphors that people use. As with the choice of particular vocabulary, the choice of metaphor suggests different ideas about career which educators are likely to want to explore and, at times, challenge. The research was conducted during autumn 2011 and involved interviews with 82 young people, and nine career helpers from schools and organisations largely based in the Midlands. This is a small scale study and the results are therefore presented to open up debate and thinking in this area and do not constitute an exhaustive exploration of the subject. The main findings of the research are presented under five headings each of which represents a major theme of the research.
    • Teachers and Careers: The role of school teachers in delivering career and employability learning

      Hooley, Tristram; Watts, A. G.; Andrews, David; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2015)
    • Teaching 14-19 learners in the lifelong learning sector

      Peart, Shine; Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (Learning Matters, 14/01/2011)
      More and more, teachers in the lifelong learning sector are required to teach the 14-19 age group. This book is a practical guide to delivering learning to 14-19s. It begins by looking at the background to teaching 14-19 in FE and covers current pathways for achievement. Coverage of effective delivery of the new Diploma qualification is included, giving guidance on planning and assessment. It goes on to explore the challenges of behaviour, participation and re-engaging disaffected learners. Finally, it considers the wider context of building partnerships with schools and the needs of industry and employers.
    • Teaching for inclusion: pedagogies for the 'sector of the second chance'

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (Learning Matters, 01/03/2010)
      This chapter considers the notion of inclusion, and of a 'second chance' education and its associated pedagogies. Presented in four key sections, it begins with an overview of the sector, going on to disucss the concept of second chance in the context of contemporary literature and theories of second chance. It finds a strong association between social class and second chance education. The chapter then moves on to a discussion of different pedagogical theories and approaches currently associated with the sector, again considering them in the context of contemporary literature. It concludes that, in the current climate, second chance all too often means second best.
    • Teaching Higher Education Courses in Further Education Colleges

      Tummons, Jonathan; Orr, kevin; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Sage, 30/05/2013)
      As the number of higher education (HE) courses offered in further education (FE) settings increases, so does the need for teachers and trainee teachers to develop their teaching skills. This text is written for all teachers and trainee teachers in FE. It considers what it means to teach HE in FE and how an HE environment can be created in an FE setting. The text covers day-to-day aspects of teaching including planning and assessment, giving guidance on the unique needs of HE students. Chapters on research and quality assurance support the reader in developing some advanced teaching skills. This is a practical guide for FE teachers and trainee teachers as the sector adapts to the needs of education today.
    • Teaching in the VET sector in Australia

      Atkins, Liz; Brennan Kemmis, Ros; Northumbria University (David Barlow Publishing, 01/10/2014)
      Teaching in the VET sector is a complex and highly rewarding vocation. This book provides the reader with an in depth exploration of both the theory and the practice of teaching in this sector. Each chapter invites the reader to reflect on their own practice and offers practical examples and case stories to assist the teacher to develop their own professional expertise. The chapters have been written by highly acknowledged VET researchers and teachers and all the chapters have been reviewed by people with high levels of respect and credibility in the field. This book provides the new teacher or trainee teacher with an overview of the VET sector in Australia and introduces the reader to some of the issues that are part of our VET environment. The book explores some of the dimensions of teaching and the diverse range of learners that are characteristic of any VET classroom, workshop or enterprise setting where teaching is taking place. The book also introduces the reader to some of the major learning theories that are relevant in VET and provides practical guidance on the implications of theory for VET practice. High quality assessment is critical to the credibility of VET and the book includes a chapter where this controversial area is made accessible to the reader. Language Literacy and Numeracy are now an embedded feature of VET teaching and the chapter on this topic discusses different views of LLN and encourages the reader to interrogate their own skills and apply their learning to the their teaching. eLearning is increasingly part of VET teaching and this is discussed in detail. Similarly engaging with industry is fast becoming a significant part of the role of the VET teacher and the rationale and the practical and day to day implications for this development are explored.The act of teaching is investigated and this chapter brings together many of the themes raised elsewhere. Finally the reader is introduced to the benefits of reflective practice through an exploration of some of the ways that teachers can evaluate the effectiveness of their own teaching.