• National Careers Council, an aspirational nation: creating a culture change in careers provision; Careers England Policy Commentary 21

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-06-10)
      This is the twenty-first in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The policy commentary has been prepared for Careers England by Dr Tristram Hooley (Reader in Career Development and Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby); the views expressed are those of the writer.
    • The nature of practitioner research: critical distance, power and ethics

      Appleby, Michelle; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2013-10)
      Researching within one’s place of practice allows the researcher to have the unique position of knowing the participants and the research context. The relationship the participants have with the researcher will impact upon the disclosure of information differently than research conducted by someone outside the area of practice. This can be a benefit and a drawback for the participants, the area of practice and the researcher. However, as is demonstrated within this paper, the role the researcher adopts throughout the process of gathering information is not always clear. As a student on the Doctorate of Education programme myself, the nature of practitioner research and the complexities of this type of research is of great interest to me. Beginning to develop my own research project through this taught programme has allowed an opportunity to think through these challenges and wrestle with the complexity and contradiction, dilemma and incongruity which emerges from being a researching practitioner. Within this piece it is suggested that these quandaries can be considered from the perspective of critical distance, relationships and power and ethical considerations. The idea of considering these conflicts reflexively will be explored here. Although this discussion was not based on empirical research findings as such, it is anticipated that this piece will further the understanding of practitioner research in higher education from the position of being a student and through scholastic analysis of the Ed D programme providing a particular perspective on the nature of research.
    • A new career in higher education careers work.

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-07-26)
      Neary and Hanson’s chapter reports on research conducted with the HE career development workforce and focusses on careers advisers who have moved into the field within the last five years. Their research illustrates a highly dedicated and satisfied workforce demonstrating a strong set of values. Predominantly, most have moved from other roles in education/higher education or HR and recruitment. They raise questions about the highly gendered nature of careers work which is dominated by women; as they suggest, unsurprisingly given how many caring jobs are still associated with a female workforce. Their chapter supports what Thambar reports in her chapter about the dedicated nature of careers advisers.
    • NHBC Foundation: improving recruitment of young people into home building : a compendium of resources

      Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2014-12-18)
      This document is a resource of home building and construction related careers and promotional material for young people seeking to work in the sector. It is organised under general careers resources, home building specific resources, construction and STEM resources. The resources are organised under the organisation providing the resource, name of the scheme they offer, the target sector and age group it is aimed at the type of resource and description.
    • NHBC Foundation: improving recruitment of young people into home building : a literature review

      Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2014-12-18)
      This literature review was undertaken to support research into young people's attitudes to careers in house building. The review is based on database searches supplemented by the evidence gathered during stakeholder interviews and through requests made to the wider careers and home building sectors. In order to fully answer the main research questions, the literature mapping the barriers faced by young people to working within the sector was explored. Based on the review a set of criteria for analysing and categorising industry sector initiatives will also be developed. The criteria will be presented as a separate compendium of opportunities.
    • No change there then: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (BERA, 01/09/2012)
      This paper explores the findings of a qualitative study carried out in summer 2010 on behalf of City and Guilds Centre for Skills Development (CSD), which explored young peoples perceptions of vocational education. The participants, drawn from schools and colleges across England, were pursuing a broad range of vocational programmes. Data were gathered using a series of focus groups and individual interviews and analysed using a thematic approach within a Bourdieusian theoretical framework drawing on notions of structure and agency, field and habitus as well as on the extensive body of literature exploring vocational education and school to work transitions for young people. The field work for the study was conducted at the time of the General Election and this analysis also contextualises the findings in terms of the Coalition response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). The key findings of the study suggest that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others rather than Careers Education and Guidance (CEG) are most significant in choice of vocational programme and that young peoplesunderstandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age group, level of programme and subject area. Further, their perceptions of the attractiveness of vocational education and training are closely associated with the value they place on their courses and wider societal perception of those courses which they consider to be negative, suggesting that pre-Coalition policy has been unsuccessful in addressing issues of parity of esteem. The paper discusses these findings in the context of contemporary educational structures in England which inhibit transfer from vocational to academic routes and ongoing issues around parity of esteem, and explores their implications for the most marginalised young people particularly those who are engaged with vocational education at its lowest mainstream levels and those who are NEET - in the context of current Coalition policy. The paper concludes that whilst some recent policy initiatives, such as the proposed introduction of University Technical Colleges for 14-19 year olds may be successful in raising the esteem of some types of specialised vocational education, broad vocational courses at lower levels, and those short courses associated with employabilityand reengagement, are likely to continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • Nothing changes: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 25/06/2015)
      This paper explores young people's perceptions of vocational education and training (VET) in England. It draws on interview and focus-group data from a funded project. Parallel studies were carried out in The Netherlands, South Africa and England. This study reports on the English project. It found that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others are most influential in choice of vocational programme and that young peoples' understandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age, programme level and subject area. Perceived attractiveness of VET was closely associated with societal perception of their programmes (which the young people considered to be negative). The paper considers the implications of these findings in the context of recent major policy initiatives in England. It concludes that, while some recent policy initiatives, such as the introduction of University Technical Colleges may be successful in raising the esteem of some forms of elite and specialized VET, broad vocational programmes at lower levels, and short courses associated with 'employability' and 're-engagement', will continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working-class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • The odyssey: school to work transitions, serendipity and position in the field.

      Atkins, Liz; Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.; Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK (Taylor and Francis., 2016-02-15)
      Little work on the significance and implications of decision-making has been undertaken since that led by Hodkinson in the 1990s, and the experiences of young people on vocational programmes and their reasons for undertaking them remain under-theorised and poorly understood. Drawing on two narratives from a study exploring young people’s motivations for undertaking vocational programmes, this article explores the relationship between their positioning in fields and career decision-making. The article argues that social positioning is significant in its relationship to decision-making, to the way in which young people perceive and construct their careers and to the influence of serendipity on their transitions. Drawing on a range of international studies, the article explores the implications of these findings in terms of young people’s future engagement with the global labour market, giving consideration to (dissonant) perceptions of vocational education and training as contributing to economic growth whilst addressing issues of social exclusion and promoting social justice.
    • Ofsted thematic review and Government action plan: Careers England Policy Commentary 23

      Watts, A. G. (Careers England, 2013-09)
      The Ofsted review of career guidance provision in schools describes in detail the erosion that has taken place as a result of recent Government policies, and the limited nature of current provision in most schools. A Government Action Plan issued alongside the review proposes revisions to the Statutory Guidance for schools, and a limited extension of the role of the National Careers Service in relation to schools, without new funding. The proposed actions fall substantially short of those recommended by the House of Commons Education Select Committee.
    • Online research methods for mental health

      Hooley, Tristram; Wellens, Jane; Madge, Clare; Goss, Stephen; University of Leicester (Charles C. Thomas Publishers, 2010)
    • Opportunity and aspiration, or the great deception? The case of 1419 vocational education

      Atkins, Liz; University of Nottingham (Power and Education, 01/01/2010)
      The policy discourse around those young people who are the focus of the 1419 agenda in the United Kingdom is one of negativity which frames them as low achievers with low aspirations. In tension with this deficit model, policy offers these young people opportunities' in the form of a vocational education which, according to the rhetoric, will lead to high-skill, high-paid work and a lifetime of opportunities. Drawing on original empirical research, this article contests the assumption that these young people have low aspirations, arguing that constrained by discourses of negativity and lacking the agency for change, their chances of achieving their aspirations are almost non-existent. Further, it suggests that the rhetoric of opportunityis merely smoke and mirrors, a massive deception whereby young people are channelled into the low-pay, low-skill work market in readiness to fulfil economic demands for cheap labour as and when it is needed. It concludes with proposals for change in the 1419 and post-compulsory education and training systems which could provide a more equitable and effective framework for young people to achieve their hopes and dreams.
    • Participants' productive disruption of a community photo-elicitation project: improvised methodologies in practice

      Vigurs, Katy; Kara, Helen (Taylor and Francis, 2016-08-23)
      This article reports on an attempt to use photo-elicitation to explore contested intergenerational perceptions and experiences of ‘place’ in one English village. Participants actively disrupted the photo-elicitation project and ended up co-creating an enriched research design that allowed them to represent how they experienced ‘place’. The spontaneous, mixed media-elicitation that resulted overturns some of the more straightforward notions that are aligned with photo-elicitation techniques. This article builds on a growing body of critical literature on photo-elicitation and shows how participants’ disruption of a project’s research methods can be both challenging and fruitful in practice. The researcher's flexibility and willingness to work with participants’ alternative approaches proved extremely effective in allowing participants to communicate their ‘imagined geographies’ (Massey & Jess, 1995) and to identify experiences of social inequality. This article explores how the initially problematic in participant involvement can be turned into the productive through the use of 'improvised methodologies'.
    • Pastoral care for young people in the workplace.

      Neary, Siobhan; Parker, Gordon; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2017)
      This research sets out to explore the range and type of support that employers have in place to support young people’s transition from education to the workplace. As well as exploring the traditional support through induction and training we have also examined additional support which we have defined as pastoral care. Emerging from the research with there was a dissatisfaction for young people with the preparation that they had received prior to leaving education. The grievances centred around two key areas: that schools often focus on academic achievement and transition to university rather than to employment; and topics such as making pension arrangements and dealing with tax and NI contributions were reported as not being adequately discussed at school/college. These activities are core parts of working life for everyone and need addressing so that young people understand and can make informed decisions about their financial futures. Young people are generally happy with the support that they receive from employers. Almost one third of the young people surveyed had a mentor or buddy appointed when they started work and all young interviewees stated that they were aware of someone they could go to for pastoral and/or other kinds of support. Although most had not needed to access such support themselves. Sometimes the person offering support was doing so in an ‘official’ capacity, as someone who had been appointed by the employer or was someone in a managerial role. Sometimes, support was provided more informally, by a ‘mate’ or older colleague, which was often reported as the most valuable type of support.
    • Personal guidance: What works?

      Everitt, Julia; Neary, Siobhan; Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2018-11-13)
    • ‘Personal reflections on the governing of private schools: a case study’

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (Sage, 2013-07)
      Much of what we understand about school governance is generally under-researched and there is almost no recent research undertaken into the governing of schools in the non-maintained, private or independent sector that are financed by the payment of fees. These schools broadly follow a model of governance that is similar to that of the maintained sector in their constitution, with some notable differences around how governors are appointed and their roles are conceived. This article aims to analyse the nature of independent school governance generally, focusing on a case study of a small private school located in the Midlands. The context of this school is a fairly unique one with governance being held accountable to non-executive Trustees who have overall control of the school operation, but who devolve that responsibility to the governing body. This article starts with a review of the current governance model in private schools, then looking in more depth at the characteristics of governance in this independent school. An analysis of the findings is then explored with some thoughts and conclusions around opportunities for further exploration into private school governance.
    • Pop-up shops for increasing employability and contributing to civil society in times of austerity

      Hill, Inge; Bass, Tina; Coventry University (Springer, 2019-09-24)
      This chapter discusses a learning and teaching unit pop-up shop rooted in experiential learning. This pop-up shop learning activity aims to increase employability and educate young learners how to contribute to civil society. The discussion offers a reflection on how lecturers’ roles are changing in response to the austerity informed UK policies and HE measures. Universities are increasingly required to generate larger numbers of enterprising, employment-ready graduates. Increased monitoring of the efficient use of public spending in HE has seen the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) bringing more focus on employability rates, which in turn help to determine university rankings. These rankings put pressure on HE senior management, which is then passed down through the hierarchy to lecturers. The detailed guidance on how to run pop-up shops offers a pragmatic answer to the outlined challenges to inspire lecturers to develop their learning and teaching strategies. Particular attention is paid to developing reflective skills in learners.
    • Practical matters: What young people think about vocational education in England

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Oldfield, Ben; University of Huddersfield (City and Guilds Centre for Skills Development, 01/06/2011)
    • Preparing the next generation of career development practitioners.

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2017-10)
      This article reviews the progress being made at the University of Derby in teaching the new qualification for career development practitioners: The Qualification in Career Development.
    • Pride and Prospects: Developing a socially just level 1 curriculum to enable more positive school to work transitions

      Atkins, Liz; University of Derby (iCEGS, 2019-06-19)
      This paper reports on an ongoing project, being conducted in Guernsey, which is evaluating the medium term impact of a new curriculum model designed to enable more successful, and less precrious transitions to work for young people undertaking broad vocational education at level 1. Careers Education and Guidance (CEG) forms a central plank of the curriculum, in response to earlier research (Bathmaker, 2001; Atkins, 2009; Atkins et al, 2015) suggesting that young people undertaking programmes at this level have aspirations similar to their higher achieving peers, but lack the support, and cultural and social capital to realise those aspirations. The paper highlights the particular challenges faced by these young people, of whom 33% became NEET in 2015/16 (Guernsey College data), with particular reference to their career aspirations and the ways in which these are supported by the college. The paper positions the study as research for social justice, rather than socially just research (Atkins and Duckworth, 2019), but draws on theoretical concepts of social justice to inform the conduct of the study (e.g. Lincoln and Denzin, 2013). Theoretically, it draws on, amongst others, the work of Bourdieu (e.g.1990) Bourdieu and Passeron (1990) , Hodkinson et al (1996) and Hodkinson (e.g. 1996; 1998; 2008).
    • Professional Identity : what I call myself defines who I am

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (Career Development Institute, 2014-06)
      The article explores professional identity and the the contributors that contribute to this. It particularly focuses on the roles of job titles and CPD in contributing to defining how practitioners see themselves within a professional context.