• I am here to learn biology, not 'personal development': testing the blueprint for Careers

      Neary, Siobhan; Beizsley, Celia; University of Derby, iCeGS; University of Derby, Career Development Centre (2012-10-09)
      University careers services in the UK are increasingly challenged to contribute to ensuring graduates find, obtain and engage with graduate level opportunities. Parallel to this the range of graduate opportunities has become increasingly competitive. All universities strive to identify and promote their added value to the academic experience. The Blueprint for Careers (LSIS, 2011a) builds on international practice in developing career management competencies. It offers a useful framework, which can be used by careers professionals to work with students and academics to review and assess the attainment of career competencies. This multi-layered research project utilised an on-line questionnaire, student peer researcher training and focus groups to engage a sample of students across all faculties of the university. The indicative findings present a mixed picture, with students generally feeling most confident about their attitudes to lifelong learning, and how changes in society impact on life, learning and work. Areas of least confidence focused on the ability to make effective career and life decisions and planning and managing life, learning and work. In relation to programme provision students welcomed opportunities to engage in extra curricular activities but demanded more focused and relevant work experience opportunities.
    • I'm lucky. I love my job

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Evropská Kontakní Skupina (EKS), 2017-06)
      This chapter argues for the need for Careers Advisers to focus on clients happiness as an outcome of their practice.
    • The impact of books on social inclusion and development and well-being among children and young people with severe and profound learning disabilities: recognising the unrecognised cohort

      Robinson, Deborah; Moore, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; University of Derby; Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (Wiley, 2019-02-07)
      This paper presents the findings of an original research project commissioned by BookTrust, a respected UK charity that gifts books to children, young people (CYP) and their families. It explored the impact and modus of pleasurable engagement with books among CYP with severe and profound learning disabilities and applied a critical, phenomenological stance on what it means to read through drawing on 'inclusive literacy' as a conceptual framework. Data was collected from four local areas in England and included 43 CYP aged 4-14. In keeping with a phenomenological stance, it employed interpretivist methods involving 13 deep-level interviews with families to include observations and structured play; 13 observations of CYP sharing books with others in home, play or school settings, and interviews with 27 practitioners working in a range of organisations (e.g. Portage service, advisory teams). Findings were that books had a positive impact on well-being, social inclusion and development. CYP were engaged in enjoying the content of books through personalisation, sensory stimulation, social stimulation and repetition. This affirmed the theoretical and practical approaches espoused by 'inclusive literacy' but made a critical and original contribution to our understanding of the special place that books occupy as ordinary artefacts of literary citizenship among this cohort. The benefits of volitional reading among CYP who do not have learning disabilities are well known but the authors urge publishers and policy makers to recognise CYP with severe and profound learning disabilities as equally important, active consumers of books who have much to gain from reading for pleasure. There is strong evidence of the positive relationship between reading for pleasure and attainment, emotional and economic wellbeing. Reading books for pleasure has strong associations with emotional and personal development including self-understanding. This is shown to be the case across genders and socioeconomic groups but significantly less research has been done on the impact of reading books for pleasure among people with learning disabilities. This paper provides an original account of the impact of pleasurable reading and engagement with books on children and young people (CYP) with severe learning disabilities (SLD) and profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD). It demonstrates that responsive adults support pleasurable engagement with books and reading in ways that enable children and young people with reading disabilities to develop sensory, shared focus, communication, social and cultural understanding whilst also providing a basis for shared attention, closeness and wellbeing. Provided is account of the modus of pleasurable reading and engagement with books within the conceptual frame of inclusive literacy and phenomenological conceptions of what it means to read. Effective practices are illustrated and outlined to include recognition of the importance of multi-modal texts, personalisation and intense dyadic interaction. The paper urges policy makers and publishers to recognises CYP with SLD and PMLD as important, active consumers of books, claiming that their relative absence from consideration of positive impacts is a sign of exclusive conceptualisations of what it means to be a literate citizen.
    • Integrated policies: creating systems that work

      McCarthy, John; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Kuder, 2015)
      This paper is concerned with the integration of career development policies across the world. It was prepared in advance of the International Centre for Career Development and Public Policy symposium in Des Moines 2015.
    • International approaches to quality in career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Competence Norway, 2019-04-10)
      This report explores the issue of quality and quality assurance in career guidance. It is based on six case studies which look at how different countries quality assure their career guidance provision. The aim of the study is to use these international examples to inform the development of a quality system for career guidance in Norway.
    • International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) Annual Report 2014

      University of Derby International Centre for Guidance Studies; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2015)
    • International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) Annual Review 2015

      University of Derby International Centre for Guidance Studies; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
    • International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) Annual Review 2016

      University of Derby International Centre for Guidance Studies; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2017)
    • International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) Annual Review 2018.

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2018-12-01)
    • The international symposia on career development and public policy: retrospect and prospect

      Watts, A. G.; Bezanson, L.; McCarthy, John; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      Between 1999 and 2011, seven international symposia on career development and public policy were held at various venues across the world, and an International Centre was established to support and maintain continuity between these events. These developments were closely intertwined with a number of other significant international developments. The origins of the symposia are described; their core design features are defined; their evolution is outlined and reviewed; and their impact is assessed. This article concludes with a discussion of the prospects for future symposia and for the International Centre.
    • Introducing a fellowship scheme for the CDI

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (The Career Development Institute, 2019-06)
      The article outlines the process adopted and the outcomes for the development for a Fellowship programme within the Career Development Institute. It explores the rationale for adoption, the criteria for selection and strategy for progressing this new membership conferment.
    • Invisible Students, Impossible Dreams: Experiencing vocational education 14-19

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (Trentham Books, 01/09/2009)
      This book explores the aspirations and experiences of the young people who are the real focus of the 14-19 agenda - the 'disaffected', 'disengaged' and low-achieving. Perceived not to have succeeded in traditional academic subjects, they move into low-level vocational education programmes post-16, often failing to pursue or complete 'opportunities' for progression. Based on original research carried out in two large FE Colleges in England's Midlands, the book presents rich qualitative data about the lives and educational experiences of these young people. It contests common assumptions that their aspirations are low, and illuminates the complexities of their lives as they try to make the transition from school to work. The data is presented in narrative form so the voices of the young people are clearly heard as they discuss their lives, hopes and aspirations. The book sets out the implications of the findings for policy and practice, so will be essential reading for trainee teachers who hope to work with 14-19 students and for professionals already involved in the implementation of the 14-19 agenda, whether as teacher practitioners, managers or policy makers.
    • 'It all kind of symbolises something doesn't it?' How students present their career image online.

      Hooley, Tristram; Cutts, Beth; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2018-04-04)
      It has become common to share images of yourself online. There is evidence that employers are using these images as part of selection decisions. This article presents a research project which explored these issues with current undergraduates. It found that students had a clear understanding of what a professional online career image would look like, but that this was not reflected in the images that they shared. However, students were careful and considered in the images that they did share; they just did not want employers looking at them. For careers professionals this situation presents an ethical challenge as to how far we want to curb students’ online identities to ensure their employability.
    • Its in their nature to nurture: a comparison of PCE mentors perception of their role and the emerging national requirements

      Wallace, Sue; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (01/09/2006)
      This paper explores the ways in which subject specialist mentors perceive their role and thereby their professional development needs - in terms of their responsibility for the observation of teaching practice in post-compulsory education settings. It suggests that their role as the mentors perceive it is not consistent with, or limited to, that which is implied in the emerging model of post-compulsory teacher training. Its findings further suggest that the training available for professionals undertaking this largely unpaid role is both limited and variable and that there is minimal engagement with the support which is available. The paper argues that a lack of coherence has led to an inequitable situation where students on post-compulsory Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses receive variable support which impacts on their student experience and professional development. The investigation, based on a range of initiatives, resources and approaches developed during 2005/2006 as part of a DfES pilot study involving Nottingham Trent University (NTU), Lincoln College and Stamford College, makes recommendations for developments in local and national practice, and in government policy.
    • Jetting off on another flying faculty visit: what have we learned?

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (BERA, 2018-01-31)
      The increased demand for education as a tradable commodity has seen a growing number of international students seeking UK qualifications over the past decade (OECD, 2009). It is becoming commonplace for universities to have their programmes delivered ‘off-site’ by a teaching team of academics who make regular trips abroad, often at great distance, to teach international cohorts for intensive periods of time. This is commonly known as ‘flying faculty’, and research into this phenomenon has revealed that it is anything but a holiday in the sun. Smith (2014) found that there were four areas UK academics needed to consider when preparing to undertake such work. Issues around quality assurance of the programme. The teaching and learning practices of the department/faculty. The professional development of the academics. The challenges of undertaking this type of work.
    • The Kent model of career education and guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Kent County Council, 2015-05)
    • Know your mean from your median

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-01)
      Tristram Hooley took over the helm for ISE research last year. Here he delves into our annual student recruitment survey to explore the number of applications per hire and how it should be interpreted.
    • Leadership and ministry, lay and ordained: Insights from rural multi-church groups

      Weller, Paul; Artess, Jane; Sahar, Arif; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-07)
      This report examines and explores leadership challenges and opportunities in the setting of Christian ministry and witness within the rural multi-church context. The challenges arise from a combination of demographic and socio-economic challenges coupled with inherited building, operational structures and patterns of ordained ministry. It utilises in-depth literature review, semi-structured interviews and a mapping of training provision to establish the challenges and opportunities for rural multi-church contexts. A lack of confidence was identified as the biggest barrier in encouraging clergy and lay people to look at ministry and witness new ways to engage in learning and development opportunities. It is recognised that a one-size-fits all approach is not appropriate but consideration needs to be given to the extension of formal training courses at local level, short modular approaches and the informal approaches such as mentoring.
    • Leading career management (CMS) in Europe

      Neary, Siobhan; Bujok, Ella; Mosley, Stella; University of Derby; CASCAID; da Vinci Community School (The Career Development Institute, 2017-04)
      iCeGS at the University of Derby together with CASCAID are working with a number of European partners to develop a career management skills (CMS) framework. The article presents the pilots in the UK that are testing out elements of the framework with year 10 students, mature students and post 16 level 1. Project outcomes will be disseminated at an international conference in Summer 2017.
    • Leading change for survival: the rural flexi-school approach

      Poultney, Val; Anderson, Duncan; University of Derby (BELMAS, 2019-08-19)
      Nestled in the Staffordshire moorlands, a small rural school appointed a Head Teacher, who also served as teacher, for a school community of 5 children in 2010. Shortly afterwards, the school was earmarked for closure. Passionate for the school to remain open, the Head Teacher sought to adopt a flexi-schooling approach. The school is now at capacity with just under 50 children, most of whom have previously been home educated or school refusers. Carnie (2017) describes flexi-schooling as an agreed contract and partnership whereby the school and family agree responsibilities for the education of the children concerned. It is characterised in part by there being no unique location for education. Parents, according to Neuman & Guterman (2019) are important and active participants in the education of their children. They have a clear educational role working in close collaboration and partnership with the school, where the home environment is central to the teaching process