• The 50 great books on education

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (The Conversation Trust (UK), 2014-31-03)
    • Academic freedom and the diminished subject

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2009)
    • The academics vs the bureaucracy

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (spiked Ltd., 2016-09-21)
      Why the Stern Review of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) could mean the end of the university as we know it.
    • Advancing ambitions: the role of career guidance in supporting social mobility

      Hooley, Tristram; Matheson, Jesse; Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (The Sutton Trust, 2014-10)
      Career guidance describes activities which support individuals to learn about education and employment and plan for their future lives, learning and work. These activities contribute to social mobility, helping people to discover and access opportunities that might exist outside of their immediate networks. They also encourage individuals to challenge their pre-existing assumptions about what they are capable of and to develop practical strategies to operationalise their aspirations.
    • Advising on career image: perspectives, practice and politics

      Yates, Julia; Hooley, Tristram; University of East London; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-02-17)
      This article analyses qualitative data gathered from a survey of career practitioners on the issue of career image (n = 355, 75% female, 89% white and 78% from the UK). Findings reveal three key themes which represent how career image relates to practitioners’ values and beliefs, how practitioners make decisions about whether to address the topic in their practice and the strategies they use to address career image with their clients. Findings are discussed with reference to Watts’s socio-political ideologies of guidance. The data indicate that career practitioners are often uncomfortable about discussing career image, but address it where they believe that it is important to their clients’ success. While some practitioners believe the existing structures to be unjust, they generally seek to address this injustice at the individual level rather than seeking any kind of social transformation.
    • Affect: knowledge, communication, creativity and emotion

      Ecclestone, Kathryn; Hayes, Dennis; Oxford Brookes University; University of Derby (Futurelab, 2008-12)
      Concerns about emotional well-being have recently become the focus of social policy, particularly in education settings. This is a sudden and unique development in placing new ideas about emotion and creativity and communication in curriculum content, pedagogy and assessment, but also in redefining fundamentally what it is to ‘know’. Our report charts the creation of what we call an ‘emotional epistemology’ that may undermine all previous ideas about epistemology, draws out implications for educational aspirations and purposes and evaluates potential implications for these aspirations and purposes if trends we identify here continue into the future.
    • Alternative schooling

      Flower, Annie; Cottle, Vanessa; University of Derby (Pearson Education Limited, 2011)
      This chapter provides you with a general introduction to approaches to education and school curricula by considering examples of schools from Europe and the USA, which have a role in providing alternative curricula to the English National Curriculum and also considers educational policy.
    • ‘ … and now it’s over to you’: recognising and supporting the role of careers leaders in schools in England

      Andrews, David; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-11-11)
      There is a long history of teachers and schools being involved in the delivery of career education and guidance. As the breadth of career education and guidance activity in English schools grew throughout the twentieth century it became increasingly necessary to have an individual within the school responsible for leading and managing this activity (the careers leader). The transfer of responsibility for career guidance from local authorities to schools following the Education Act 2011 has intensified the need for this role. There have been various attempts to conceptualise and professionalise the role of careers leader and to develop appropriate training and support. This article defines the role and the rationale for the role, sets out its history and makes recommendations for the future professionalisation of the role. It is argued that this will include recognition of the role by policy, professionalisation and the development of a career structure and the development of appropriate training and CPD.
    • A beacon for guidance : how the International Centre for Guidance Studies has been influencing policy and practice for 16 years

      Hyde, C.; University of Derby, iCeGS; East Midlands Oral History Archive (iCeGS University of Derby, 2014-06)
      The publication documents the history of the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby. It focuses on how the centre has influenced policy and practice in the careers sector over the last 16 years.
    • The ‘Blueprint’ framework for career management skills: a critical exploration

      Hooley, Tristram; Watts, A. G.; Sultana, Ronald G.; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2013)
      This article examines the Blueprint framework for career management skills as it has been revealed across sequential implementations in the USA, Canada and Australia. It is argued that despite its lack of an empirical basis, the framework forms a useful and innovative means through which career theory, practice and policy can be connected. The framework comprises both core elements (learning areas, learning model and levels) and contextual elements (resources, community of practice, service delivery approach and policy connection). Each of these elements is explored.
    • Building a progression culture: exploring learning organisations’ use of the Progression Matrix

      Moore, Nicki; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2011-09)
      This research paper explores the implementation of The Progression Matrix in schools, colleges and other learning organisations such as training providers. The project builds on existing research on The Progression Matrix and finds evidence which suggests that the approach provides a useful conceptual model around which learning organisations can re-orientate their practice and deliver enhanced progression for learners.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring. Executive Summary.

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building online employability: a guide for academic departments

      Longridge, Debra; Hooley, Tristram; Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-06)
      This guide will help academic departments to support students to think about their careers and to use the online environment wisely. Used badly the array of social media and online technologies can seriously disadvantage a students’ career development, but if used well they can support students to find out about and transition into their future career.
    • Business games and enterprise competitions. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Cox, Annette; Hooley, Tristram; The Careers and Enterprise Company; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-11-03)
      This paper provides the underpinning evidence on business games and enterprise competitions. Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying possible impacts from business games and enterprise competitions and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • Business games and enterprise competitions. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Cox, Annette; University of Derby (Careers and Enterprise Company, 2017-09)
      This paper provides the underpinning evidence on business games and enterprise competitions. Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying possible impacts from business games and enterprise competitions and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • Can aspiration kill local community? Challenges for young people and career practitioners in Sri Lanka

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2013-10)
      Raising aspiration is a primary focus of careers work. However, in some circumstances enhanced aspirations may create tensions in situations of limited accessible opportunity. Additionally focusing on the autonomy of the individual and their choice can impact more broadly on local community. This article will explore the importance of locating career guidance in context, specifically in relation to some of the issues facing career practitioners working in Sri Lanka. These practitioners seek to inspire young people to a range of careers whilst remaining conscious of the individual and local impacts that may result. It will consider the concept of 'foundation' which encompasses the physical, social, religious and spiritual, cultural and political environment and the role this might play in providing a holistic model for career guidance.
    • Can we work together and still be friends?

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (2011-04)
      Recently at my institution, the University of Derby, we have recognised a burgeoning increase in the number of academic staff undertaking postgraduate courses which requires tutoring or supervision from other academic colleagues. Increasingly the postgraduate team is undertaking ‘colleague to colleague’ supervision for Master’s and Doctoral programmes. While this may be nothing new in Higher Education (HE) institutions I was interested in some of the ways in which this pedagogy impacted on professional relationships. There appeared to be little written in the academic literature at least about ‘colleague to colleague’ supervision, but at a recent University Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) conference the theme was widely recognised by many university staff. There are increasing constraints on the CPD budgets in secondary schools that goes nowhere near covering professional development requirements for all staff. Schools must therefore turn ‘in house’ and make full use of existing teacher capacity to cover the shortfall perhaps under the auspices of coaching and mentoring. This drive for getting ‘value for money’ would require teachers to work more closely together, perhaps on a one to one basis over longer periods of time. How do teachers manage one to one professional relationships; which can be improved when they work but difficult to sustain if they do not.
    • Capturing habitus: theory, method and reflexivity.

      Costa, Cristina; Burke, Ciaran; Murphy, Mark; University of Strathclyde; University of Derby; University of Glasgow; School of Education, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Taylor and Francis, 2018-01-11)
      Bourdieu’s career long endeavour was to devise both theoretical and methodological tools that could apprehend and explain the social world and its mechanisms of cultural (re)production and related forms of domination. Amongst the several key concepts developed by Bourdieu, habitus has gained prominence as both a research lens and a research instrument useful to enter individuals’ trajectories and ‘histories’ of practices. While much attention has been paid to the theoretical significance of habitus, less emphasis has been placed on its methodological implications. This paper explores the application of the concept of habitus as both theory and method across two sub-fields of educational research: graduate employment and digital scholarship practices. The findings of this reflexive testing of habitus suggest that bridging the theory-method comes with its own set of challenges for the researcher; challenges which reveal the importance of taking the work of application seriously in research settings.
    • Career development in Canada

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-11-19)
      This report sets out the findings from a research study visit that I (Tristram Hooley) undertook in Canada during the summer of 2011. The study visit was made possible by the generous funding of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust. During the visit I was able to explore the career development systems in five Canadian provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia). I was also able to briefly visit another two provinces (Prince Edward Island and Quebec) and to talk to a number of organisations with national remits.