• Evaluation of the careers leader training

      Williams, Joy; Akehurst, Georgie; Alexander, Kate; Pollard, Emma; Williams, Ceri; Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Employment Studies; University of Derby (Institute of Employment Studies, 2020-05)
      This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the careers leaders training programme which was funded by the Careers & Enterprise Company.
    • Jetting off on another flying faculty visit: what have we learned?

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (BERA, 2018-01-31)
      The increased demand for education as a tradable commodity has seen a growing number of international students seeking UK qualifications over the past decade (OECD, 2009). It is becoming commonplace for universities to have their programmes delivered ‘off-site’ by a teaching team of academics who make regular trips abroad, often at great distance, to teach international cohorts for intensive periods of time. This is commonly known as ‘flying faculty’, and research into this phenomenon has revealed that it is anything but a holiday in the sun. Smith (2014) found that there were four areas UK academics needed to consider when preparing to undertake such work. Issues around quality assurance of the programme. The teaching and learning practices of the department/faculty. The professional development of the academics. The challenges of undertaking this type of work.
    • Training careers professionals: Underpinning research for the C-Course programme.

      Hooley, Tristram; Schulstok, Torild; University of Derby; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2021)
      This report sets out the findings of research conducted in the Czech Republic, Norway, Slovakia and Poland to underpin the development of a new professional e-learning programme for careers practitioners. The recommendations are based on a review of the literature, desk research in each of the countries, expert interviews and practitioner focus groups. Overall, the research finds that: 1. there is a clear demand for an e-learning course for careers practitioners across the four countries. The e-learning should: 2. be clearly articulated in a way that clarifies who should engage with it and why; 3. be flexible to ensure that a wide range of practitioners can access and benefit from it; 4. include interaction with others and foster a community of practice; and 5. make use of a range of technologies by using multi-media and interactive tools. In terms of content, the training should include: 6. clarification of the key terminology and definitions with the field; 7. an overview different approaches to delivering careers services; 8. how to work with a range of different sectors and different client groups; 9. how to work more systemically e.g. with families, communities and organisations; 10. knowledge about the education system, labour market and the research skills required to gather this information for yourself; 11. support for those who are undergoing the training to become professionals and adopt healthy, ethical, reflective, and context-aware practice; and 12. an overview of key theories and evidence for more advanced practitioners.