• Are young people aged 16-19 using or expecting to use the gig economy for their careers

      Galfalvi, Esther; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (NICEC, 2020-10)
      Amid growing precarity and zero hour contracts, the ‘gig economy’ represents a new way of working mediated by web technology. Workers can sign up to a work platform – a website or smartphone program that manages the work automatically – and take on work at the tap of a button. Some platforms manage labour, such as driving for Uber or delivering food for Deliveroo, while others manage retail activity, such as Ebay or Etsy. Recent research has shown that a significant number of people are using platform work to earn money, with over half being young people aged 16-34. While there are some data regarding satisfaction levels and attractors, there is little research examining specific age segments of workers, or the relationship between platform work and career. Using data from focus group interviews with school and Further Education college students, this paper will discuss findings from research investigating how young people in England aged 16-19 perceive the gig economy and whether they feel that it will be relevant to their careers, with a view to discussing whether it may be necessary to include in careers education programmes or guidance. The interview data indicate that these participants were occasionally using platforms to make money, and a few were earning regularly, usually on retail platforms. While some interviewees appreciated the autonomy and flexibility promised by gig economy work, the uncertainty, perceived low status, and lack of career progression prevented them from taking it seriously as a career option. Instead, they preferred traditional forms of work that provide more stability and organisational support - an increasingly rare commodity in a labour market that is changing rapidly in the opposite direction. We conclude that while there may be little value in giving detailed individual guidance on the gig economy, it could be valuable to use it as a way of teaching young people about the labour market and different types of employment
    • A global pandemic and its aftermath: The way forward for career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2020-11)
      This lecture explores the implications of the global pandemic for career guidance. It argues that career guidance needs to radically and rapidly reform in the face of the pandemic both by adopting digital and integrated delivery approaches and through a stronger engagement in social justice.
    • Introduction: Rethinking career development

      McCash, Phil; Hooley, Tristram; Robertson, Peter J.; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2021-01-13)
      This chapter introduces readers to The Oxford Handbook of Career Development and to the field of career development. The origins of the field are discussed in relation to vocational guidance, differential psychology, interactionist sociology, and life course development. The selection of the term career development for this volume is explained with regard to three interlocking themes: the broader contexts of career development, including government policy; the wide range of theory concerned with career-related experiences, phenomena, and behaviour; and the broad spectrum of career helping practices, including one-to-one work and group work. The inspiration and aims for the volume are set out, and the challenges associated with terminology in the field are acknowledged. The editors seek to provide a state-of-the-art reference point for the field of career development, and engender a transdisciplinary and international dialogue that explores key current ideas, debates, and controversies. The volume is divided into three sections. The first explores the economic, educational, and public policy contexts for practice. The second section focuses on concepts and explores the rich theoretical landscape of the field. The third section turns to practice, and the translation of ideas into action to support individuals and groups with their career development.
    • 'It helps to have more strings to your bow’. Exploring the careers and success of graduates of the conservatoire for dance and drama

      Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Hooley, Tristram; CRAC / Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (CRAC, 2020-10)
      This report sets out the findings of a project exploring the careers pursued by the graduates from the Conservatoire of Dance and Drama. It finds that CDD graduates are positive about their experience of studying at the Conservatoire and that they frequently go on to paid work linked to their degree discipline. However, the experience of work for these graduates is likely to be of a portfolio career which links together a range of different jobs.
    • Listening to new voices in the career development field

      Albien, Anouk J.; Poulsen, Bo Kindt; Toiviainen, Sanna; Kekki, Miika; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (NICEC, 2020-10)
      This is an editorial for an issue of the Journal of the National Institute for Career Education and Counselling focusing on new and early career researchers, particularly those associated with the ECADOC programme.
    • Pining for the fjords: international perceptions of Nordic work, education and career guidance

      Hagaseth Haug, Erik; Hooley, Tristram; Kettunen, Jaana; Thomsen, Rie; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences; University of Derby (Brill, 2020-04-28)
      This chapter explores the way in which Nordic work, education and career guidance are seen by those outside of the Nordic region. It draws on an online survey of international informants which gathered respondents’ opinions about the Nordic countries. It finds that respondents are overwhelmingly positive about the Nordic countries, even though they do not claim to be particularly informed about these countries. They report that on average the Nordic countries are better places to work, study and receive career guidance than their own countries. The chapter makes the argument that the way that the brand of ‘Nordicity’ has been disseminated internationally can account for at least some of this international perception. While the ‘Nordic’ has become a powerful and positive signifier, it is an ambiguous one onto which the international community can project their own meanings and use to serve their own political ends.
    • Setting Nordic career guidance in context

      Hooley, Tristram; Kettunen, Jaana; Hagaseth Haug, Erik; Thomsen, Rie; University of Derby (Brill, 2020-04-28)
      The introduction to this volume discusses the importance of situating career and career guidance in context. It makes a connection to wider research and writing that challenges the idea that career theory can be global and universal and argues that there is a need for attention to local context and culture. It then moves on to set the scene for a volume focusing on the Nordic countries, by defining the ‘Nordic’ and exploring key features of the region including the Nordic welfare model and the history of collaborations in career guidance across the region. It proposes the four ‘COs’ of Nordic career guidance (context, community, co-construction and collaboration) before outlining the structure of the volume and looking to the future.