• Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring. Executive Summary.

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Can aspiration kill local community? Challenges for young people and career practitioners in Sri Lanka

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2013-10)
      Raising aspiration is a primary focus of careers work. However, in some circumstances enhanced aspirations may create tensions in situations of limited accessible opportunity. Additionally focusing on the autonomy of the individual and their choice can impact more broadly on local community. This article will explore the importance of locating career guidance in context, specifically in relation to some of the issues facing career practitioners working in Sri Lanka. These practitioners seek to inspire young people to a range of careers whilst remaining conscious of the individual and local impacts that may result. It will consider the concept of 'foundation' which encompasses the physical, social, religious and spiritual, cultural and political environment and the role this might play in providing a holistic model for career guidance.
    • Education Select Committee report on careers guidance for young people: Careers England policy commentary 18.

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-01)
      This is the eighteenth in an occasional series of briefing notes produced for Careers England on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. This briefing note describes and provides context to the House of Commons Education Select Committee report, 'Careers Guidance for Young People: The Impact of the New Duty on Schools'.
    • Effective transitions for Year 8 students

      Morgan, Sandra; Hutchinson, Jo; Crompton, Nicole; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2007)
      With increased choice and flexibility in the curriculum at Key Stage (KS) 4, Year 9 students will be required to make decisions that could have implications for their future progression and career choices. The provision of good quality information, advice and guidance (IAG) from Year 7 onwards is, therefore, crucial. This project aimed to establish the extent to which current careers education and guidance (CEG) provision in Years 7 and 8 is effectively equipping students with the key skills they need to make realistic choices and successful transitions in Year 9. The research indicated concerns around the decision making skills gaps, variable quality of experiences, the role of mediation of key information, and the potential for personalised support.
    • Enthusiasm Trust and Community Space Challenge: impact evaluation

      Moore, Nicki; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2012-12)
      The aims of research were:- • To build a body of evidence of impact regarding environmental volunteering services on young people, and on the community • To provide an overview of the types of young people who have participated in the past • To document aspects of previous projects that encourage young people to participate and to achieve, and those that discourage young people from participation or from sustained engagement • To identify the key resources that underpinned successful project delivery • To identify specific achievements of young people that are attributable to the programme
    • Fostering college and career readiness: how career development activities in schools impact on graduation rates and students' life success

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Sampson, James P.; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2011-07-01)
      This paper sets out the recent evidence around career development. This evidence is examined within the context of the college and career readiness agenda. The argument is made that in order for young people to be genuinely “ready” for both college and career they need to have attended to their academic achievement, their aspirations and plans for the future, their ability to make transitions and their ability to direct their own careers. It is argued that career development offers schools a body of practice that has been shown to have a positive impact on young people’s readiness for college and career. The report acknowledges that the provision of career development has been in decline in many North American schools despite evidence of its effectiveness. Given the current instability of the labor market, the increasing complexity of the education system and the need to grow the skills base of the workforce in a competitive global market, failing to attend to young people’s careers seems shortsighted. As this paper shows, there is a strong body of evidence which demonstrates that career development activity in schools can help young people to experience academic achievement, successfully transition to the labor market and live happier and more productive lives. It is hoped that setting out the evidence in this area of research will provide policy makers and school leaders with the resources required to make informed decisions and to support the development of the future generations of talent. The paper explores the impacts of career development in relation to four main questions: • Does career development engage young people in their schooling and help keep them attending school? • Does career development positively impact on young people’s academic achievement? • Does career development assist young people in making successful transitions to college or the labor market? • Does career development have a positive effect on people’s career and life success?
    • Getting it down on paper: the importance of letter writing for young people's employability

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; International Centre for Guidance Studies (2015-09-11)
    • Give yourself the edge: Evaluation report.

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-09-06)
    • Pastoral care for young people in the workplace.

      Neary, Siobhan; Parker, Gordon; Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2017)
      This research sets out to explore the range and type of support that employers have in place to support young people’s transition from education to the workplace. As well as exploring the traditional support through induction and training we have also examined additional support which we have defined as pastoral care. Emerging from the research with there was a dissatisfaction for young people with the preparation that they had received prior to leaving education. The grievances centred around two key areas: that schools often focus on academic achievement and transition to university rather than to employment; and topics such as making pension arrangements and dealing with tax and NI contributions were reported as not being adequately discussed at school/college. These activities are core parts of working life for everyone and need addressing so that young people understand and can make informed decisions about their financial futures. Young people are generally happy with the support that they receive from employers. Almost one third of the young people surveyed had a mentor or buddy appointed when they started work and all young interviewees stated that they were aware of someone they could go to for pastoral and/or other kinds of support. Although most had not needed to access such support themselves. Sometimes the person offering support was doing so in an ‘official’ capacity, as someone who had been appointed by the employer or was someone in a managerial role. Sometimes, support was provided more informally, by a ‘mate’ or older colleague, which was often reported as the most valuable type of support.
    • Schools and employers must work together.

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Kemps Publishing Ltd., 2018-06)
      This article explores the changing nature of work, the history of apprenticeships and the challenges for both young people and employers in getting the right people in the right jobs.