• The 21st Century HE Careers Professional

      Thambar, Nalayini; Neary, Siobhan; Zlatic, Franka; University of Nottingham; University of Derby (Higher Education Careers Service Unit, 2021-02-17)
      The role of HE careers services have been increasingly influenced over the last ten years or so. The research aimed to explore how various drivers, metrics such as the National Student Survey (NSS), Destinations of Leavers of Higher Education (DLHE), Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) and the introduction of higher fees have impacted practitioners and their services over the last decade. The methodology adopted a qualitative approach including, a focus group, an online survey and in-depth interviews with a sample of services representing Pre and Post 92, Russell Group and Specialist HE. Throughout the course of the research, the COVID-19 Pandemic erupted which impacted on the nature of the research project. The research identified that Careers Professionals defined their role as providing support to students in their career development and planning, including the navigation of recruitment processes. They achieve this through working directly with the students on a 1:1 basis, recognising the resource-intensity yet value of this approach, and also through the delivery of workshop activity. Alongside this, the role typically involves increased and increasing activity to embed careers education within, or to align with, the curriculum. Institutional interest in employability and resulting structures means that a growing number of careers professionals’ roles are based in a Faculty or another part of their institution such as a Graduate School, in some cases being employed directly by them rather than the Careers Service itself. This decentralization was often linked to supporting departments in achieving higher NSS and other employability related metrics.
    • The career development profession: Professionalisation, professionalism, and professional identity

      Gough, John; Neary, Siobhan; University of Warwick; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2020-09)
      This chapter examines the professionalisation of career development provision in countries across the world. ‘Professionalisation’ and ‘professionalism’ are explored through several concepts, including social closure, the professional project, and the regulatory bargain. The chapter argues that professionalism is a useful and important concept for the career development field but recognises the challenges that the field has had in achieving professional status. It recognises some of the critiques that exist of professionalism and explores how these relate to careers professionals. It then argues that increasing professionalism within the field needs to be understood as an ongoing process that has to be conducted on the personal, organizational, and professional level. The chapter concludes by outlining some key strategies that the field can use to advance the cause of professionalism in the future.
    • Professional Identity : what I call myself defines who I am

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (Career Development Institute, 2014-06)
      The article explores professional identity and the the contributors that contribute to this. It particularly focuses on the roles of job titles and CPD in contributing to defining how practitioners see themselves within a professional context.
    • Professional identity: what's that and what does it have to do with me?

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (NCGE, 2015-11)
      With changes occurring in the Further Education and Training sector in Ireland, job roles and required activities may change too. Within this context, Dr Siobhan Neary recently provided CPD to the staff of the Adult Educational Guidance Initiative about retaining clarity about their own professional identity - a key issue for CPD. In this article, she expands on the theme on the importance of reflection on professional identity and how that identity impacts on practice.
    • Professionalising careers work: The view from Europe

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Association of New Zealand, 2015)
      How do we know what it is that we share? And how do we convince others that what we do is valuable and worthy of status? Ultimately we are trying to create an understanding of our profession that is shared by practitioners, policy makers and the general public. Back in the UK after his recent speaking engagement in Auckland in April, Professor Tristram Hooley shares his thoughts.