• A beacon for guidance : how the International Centre for Guidance Studies has been influencing policy and practice for 16 years

      Hyde, C.; University of Derby, iCeGS; East Midlands Oral History Archive (iCeGS University of Derby, 2014-06)
      The publication documents the history of the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby. It focuses on how the centre has influenced policy and practice in the careers sector over the last 16 years.
    • Career guidance and inspiration in schools

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Careers England, 2015-04-07)
      This is the thirtieth in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The note has been prepared for Careers England by Professor Tristram Hooley.
    • The economic benefits of career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (Careers England, 2015-07)
      This research paper sets out the evidence on the economic benefits of career guidance. It argues that although career guidance is primarily concerned with the individual it also offers major social and economic benefits. It is these benefits that justify public investment in the area.The evidence base provides insights into the effective delivery of career guidance and highlights the three main policy areas that it can support: (1) the effective functioning of the labour market and through this the economy, (2) the effective functioning of the education system; and (3) social equity. This paper focuses on the first of these in the context of current UK (with a focus on England) policy aims around fiscal restraint and deficit reduction. Career guidance contributes to a range of individual outcomes which influence a number of primary and secondary outcomes which in turn lead to macro-economic benefits. The evidence shows that career guidance can have substantial benefits for the economy by supporting individuals to enhance their capacities in ways that contribute to enhanced jobs, skills and growth. This suggests that the government should re-examine current career guidance policy and consider how it can best maximise the aforementioned economic benefits. This may include widening access in general, considering how best to target provision and rethinking what departments might be involved in funding and influencing the development of a lifelong career guidance system in the UK.
    • Ensuring an independent future for young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND): a critical examination of the impact of education, health and care plans in England.

      Robinson, Deborah; Moore, Nicki; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby; Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, University of Derby, Derby, UK; International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, Derby, UK; International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-01-03)
      This article examines the implications of the new education, health and care (EHC) planning process for career professionals in England. The new process comes in the wake of a succession of legislation relating to young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) in England. There is much to recommend the new process as it represents a shift to a more holistic and person-centred approach. However, there are four main criticisms which can be made of the new process: (1) the policy has an excessive focus on paid work as an outcome which is unrealistic (for some young people); (2) the resourcing in local authorities is too limited to successfully operationalise the policy; (3) there is a lack of clarity about the professional base delivering EHC planning (especially in relation to the career elements); and (4) the policy is too narrowly targeted. While the new legislation offers some major opportunities, realising these will be difficult. In this paper, questions are raised about the resources required to deliver these services; the responsibilities relevant to such services; and the role and scope of these services in supporting the transitions of vulnerable young people into learning and work in an environment where universal careers provision has been substantially diminished.
    • Ensuring quality in career guidance: a critical review

      Hooley, Tristram; Rice, Suzanne; University of Derby; University of Melbourne; International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Centre for Vocational and Educational Policy, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Australia (Taylor & Francis, 2018-07-06)
      In rapidly changing employment markets, career guidance has a vital role to play in supporting people in navigating transitions between education and employment across the lifespan. In this article, the issue of quality and quality assurance in career guidance is explored. Although there is no clear agreed international understanding of what quality career guidance looks like, through a review of current approaches we identify six main areas which may be quality assured and propose a new typology of approaches to assuring quality. The article concludes by considering critically some of the issues that quality assurance approaches in career guidance generate, highlighting the need for caution so that the pursuit of quality does not undermine the goals it seeks to achieve.
    • Experiences of education, health and care plans: A survey of parents and young people.

      Adams, Lorna; Tindle, Angus; Basran, Sabrina; Dobie, Sarah; Thomson, Dominic; Robinson, Deborah; Shepherd, Claire; IFF Research; University of Derby (Department for Education, 2017-03)
      An Education, Health and Care plan (EHC plan) sets out the education, health and care support that is to be provided to a child or young person aged 0-25 years who has Special Educational Needs (SEN) or a disability (SEND). It is drawn up by the local authority after an Education, Health and Care (EHC) needs assessment of the child or young person has determined that an EHC plan is necessary, and after consultation with relevant partner agencies and with children, young people and parents. EHC plans, and the needs assessment process through which these are made, were introduced as part of the Children and Families Act 2014. The Act, and an accompanying SEND Code of Practice1, sets out how local authorities must deliver these, including:• Developing and maintaining these collaboratively with children, young people and parents; • Supporting children, young people and parents to participate fully; • Focusing on securing the best possible outcomes for the child/young person; • Enabling participation by relevant partner agencies, to enable joined-up provision.The SEND accountability framework established in 20152 sets out an approach for assessing SEND provision in conjunction with the Act and SEND Code of Practice. The framework provides structure for improving outcomes and experiences for children, young people and their families and, when applied, seeks to show how the system is performing, hold partners to account and support self-improvement. The framework applies at the local and national levels and to independent assessments of the EHC plan process – such as those carried out by Ofsted. In this context, the Department for Education commissioned a survey of parents and young people with an EHC plan, in order to build a representative national (and, where the data allows, local) picture of how parents and young people in England were experiencing the EHC needs assessment and planning process and the resultant EHC plans. The aim was to assess whether delivery of the EHC needs assessments and planning process and the resultant EHC plans reflected the intentions set out in the Children and Families Act 2014 and the accompanying SEND Code of Practice. The findings would help inform the SEND accountability framework.To achieve these aims the survey sought to answer the following questions: • To what extent do children, young people and families experience the EHC needs assessment and planning process as they are intended to be experienced; • How satisfied are children, young people and families with the EHC needs assessment and planning process and the resultant EHC plan; and • To what extent does this vary by local authority and by groups with different characteristics? The findings presented here and throughout the main report explore parents’ and young people’s responses to the survey questions. The report also explores where experiences of the EHC needs assessment and planning process varied for groups with different characteristics, applying a bivariate analysis approach3. The report only highlights such differences where these are statistically significant4.
    • External agents, providers and specialists: an exploration of the other individuals invited to be involved in schools and classrooms.

      Everitt, Julia; University of Derby (British Education Studies Association, 2018-06-28)
      This study examines the other individuals involved in schools and classrooms who are not teachers or teaching assistants. Many terms exist for these individuals including external agents, providers and specialists. This is set within a policy background of government reports, Acts and initiatives from the early 1900s which contain invitations for these external agents to be involved in schools in England. Those invited include statutory agencies, military-style organisations, the voluntary sector, community members, parents, post-16 educational institutions and employers. The literature which examines the involvement of these external agents in schools does so from a narrow perspective, such as a specific agent type or policy initiative. In contrast, the aim is to identify the full range of agents involved across four case study schools through a broad approach in that it does not focus on a type of agent (e.g. employers); a specific initiative (e.g. extended schools) or period (e.g. 1960 to 2000). It adds to knowledge in terms of this broad approach to the identification of agents, against the approach taken in previously studies. The research involves the completion of a pro-forma by a staff member at each of the four case study schools to identify the external agents involved during one academic year. It also includes semi-structured interviews with school staff and external agents plus documentary analysis of school websites and reports. The findings indicate a high involvement of external agents in the schools, with trends of agent type being linked to government policies. There is a decline in agent involvement in relation to New Labour policies such as extended schools which set a duty on every school to work in collaboration to offer activities and services (e.g. extra-curricular activities). The agent involvement has shifted to the wider aspects of the curriculum (e.g. PSHE, careers) as opposed to the wider aspects of the school (e.g. community access). There was a ‘messiness’ in the identification of agents which resulted in just a ‘snapshot’ of the agent involvement. This is a consequence of insufficient staff knowledge related to their role, time in service or value they place on the capitals (e.g. financial, cultural) of the agents. There is a disconnection between some agent perceptions of their relationship to the school and the inclusion in the data and a suggestion that some agents are involved as a tick-box exercise. In these cases, it does not appear to matter who the agent is, just what they can deliver, which poses questions over quality
    • Fog in the channel - Continent cut off: The implications of Brexit for career guidance in the UK

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2017-04)
      The decision taken by the British people to leave the European Union (EU) took many people by surprise. The macro economic, political and social implications are still unclear, but as negotiations begin the post-Brexit world is beginning to take shape. In this article I will argue that Brexit has a number of implications for those involved in career education and guidance. It will explore how the development of the EU since Maastricht has resulted in substantial shifts in the opportunity structure. Out of these changes there have been both winners and losers. Within this context Brexit can be seen as a consequence of the failure of the neoliberal approach taken by the EU to guarantee career development for all. The paper goes on to explore what the implications of Brexit are for individuals' careers and for the field of career guidance.
    • Get yourself connected: conceptualising the role of digital technologies in Norwegian career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; Shepherd, Claire; Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2015-10)
      This report outlines the role of digital technologies in the provision of career guidance. It was commissioned by the c ommittee on career guidance which is advising the Norwegian Government following a review of the countries skills system by the OECD. In this report we argue that career guidance and online career guidance in particular can support the development of Norwa y’s skills system to help meet the economic challenges that it faces.
    • London ambitions: shaping a successful careers offer for all Londoners (Careers England Policy Commentary 31)

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Careers England, 2015-07)
      This is the thirty-first in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The note has been prepared for Careers England by Professor Tristram Hooley.
    • National Careers Council, an aspirational nation: creating a culture change in careers provision; Careers England Policy Commentary 21

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-06-10)
      This is the twenty-first in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The policy commentary has been prepared for Careers England by Dr Tristram Hooley (Reader in Career Development and Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby); the views expressed are those of the writer.
    • Progression in Kent: schools taking charge

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Kent County Council, 2012)
      This report has been prepared by the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) for Kent County Council. iCeGS was commissioned to conduct an independent investigation into the implications of the Education Act 2011 for schools in Kent. The findings were gathered from schools and key stakeholders in Kent. The conclusions do not necessarily represent official Kent County Council policy.
    • Revised guidance for colleges: Careers England policy commentary 28

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2014-09)
      This is the twenty-eighth in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The note has been prepared for Careers England by Professor Tony Watts.