• Building online employability: a guide for academic departments

      Longridge, Debra; Hooley, Tristram; Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-06)
      This guide will help academic departments to support students to think about their careers and to use the online environment wisely. Used badly the array of social media and online technologies can seriously disadvantage a students’ career development, but if used well they can support students to find out about and transition into their future career.
    • Career development in Canada

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-11-19)
      This report sets out the findings from a research study visit that I (Tristram Hooley) undertook in Canada during the summer of 2011. The study visit was made possible by the generous funding of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust. During the visit I was able to explore the career development systems in five Canadian provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia). I was also able to briefly visit another two provinces (Prince Edward Island and Quebec) and to talk to a number of organisations with national remits.
    • Career development policy and practice: the Tony Watts reader

      Hooley, Tristram; Barham, Lyn; University of Derby (Highflyers, 2015)
    • Career guidance

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (National Governors Association, 2017-03-10)
      The article explains the vital role that career-related learning and guidance plays in schools. The article covers the statutory duties and strategic responsibilities of governors in both primary and secondary schools
    • Career guidance in communities: A model for reflexive practice

      Thomsen, Rie; Aarhus University (University of Derby, 2017-05-01)
      The aim of this paper is to inspire practitioners and professionals to leave their offices to bring career guidance into communities that might not identify with career guidance in the first instance. By making the effort to engage with communities, practitioners may bring about a critical change in career guidance practices as well as in the lives of the people in the communities. This paper falls into two parts: The first part considers the collective as the starting point for the development of meaningful career guidance activities. Based on previous research on career guidance in communities from a critical psychological standpoint the paper introduces a social practice theory of career guidance. The social practice theory of career guidance argues that career guidance can be seen as a collective practice in which people can join forces with career guidance practitioners to analyse their situation and based on these insights create new opportunities in relation to their future educational or vocational participation in society (Thomsen 2012). From this idea, the second part of the paper the paper moves on to consider the practical implications of taking the collective as the starting point for the development of a critically reflexive career guidance practice. The considerations are organised around seven elements. 1. Creating opportunity, structure and access 2. Entering a community and increasing visibility 3. Providing guidance in communities 4. Exploring potentials in guidance situations 5. Deciding on guidance activities 6. Developing, planning and implementing 7. Documenting and evaluating. These elements are joined together and presented as a model for reflexive practice. Each element is introduced, illustrated and examined noting important areas for reflection and action.  
    • A career in career - understanding what career looks like in the career development sector

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Cotterill, Vicky; University of Derby (The Career Development Institute, 2017-01)
      There is little known about the careers workforce in the UK. This research focuses on developing a better understanding of who chooses to become a career development practitioner, their motivation, the transferable skills they bring with them and how they see their career developing. Although respondents represent a snapshot of practitioners it identified that the workforce is female, ageing and lacks diversity. Respondents felt their was a lack of career development within the sector with mainly management available for progression.
    • A career of choice: attracting talented young people into house building

      Turner, Clive; Moore, Nicki; Bysshe, Simon; University of Derby (IHS BRE Press on behalf of NHBC Foundation, 2015-03-09)
      The purpose of this research was to establish a better understanding of how young people view house building as a career choice and to provide insights to improve recruitment of those with enthusiasm and talent into the sector. It collected the views of over 500 teenagers and young men and women between the ages of 14 and 24, and the views of those who advise them on careers.
    • Careers 2020: options for future careers work in English schools.

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Watts, A. G.; Coiffait, Louis; University of Derby (Pearson, 2012-11-01)
      Careers work in English schools has endured much turbulence recently. The government has now established a statutory duty on schools to secure provision, placing commissioning of careers advice and guidance in the hands of schools rather than local authorities or central government. But the duty is framed very loosely, comes with no funding and offers no clear model of provision. The previous funding for face-to-face guidance from qualified careers advisers has been removed, as has the duty for schools to provide careers education. So what should schools’ careers offers look like in future? How can schools ensure the quality of the career development support that is so vital for young people, and particularly so for those who cannot rely on their existing networks for advice and opportunities?
    • Changing conceptions of students' career development needs

      Artess, Jane; University of Derby (University of Niš, 2014)
      Abstract — This paper takes as its starting point a brief review of a range of theoretical assumptions about the nature of career learning and decision-making and plots the emergence of the notion of ‘employability’ as a predominant paradigm for the organisation and delivery of career guidance services in UK higher education. The acquisition of employability skills in students is essentially a deficit paradigm that the provision of work-oriented learning opportunities seeks to address. A key driver for the development of employability as an institutional priority is policy-making by governmental agencies that foregrounds university-business partnerships as a component of economic generation. The development of workbased learning (WBL) and work placements as part of higher education courses is shown to exemplify how responsibility for students’ employability development is increasingly shared between institutions and (prospective) employers. The paper draws upon recent research findings that explore issues of quality assurance in WBL and work placements and poses questions for institutional services aimed to support students’ transition from higher education to the labour market. Access to WBL and work placements appears to be stratified and different types of opportunity are taken up by particular groups of students. A relatively new way of conceptualising career learning as ‘career adaptability’ has been developed out of theories of career ‘constructivism’ and is suggested to provide a return to a more student-centred paradigm which has the potential to be more inclusive. Career adaptability is exemplified by the use of the career adaptability scale to support students’ self assessment of their career learning and development.
    • Competences of a careers adviser in a digital age

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Evropská Kontakní Skupina (EKS), 2017-06)
      This chapter describes the digital career management skills required by careers advisers in order to support their clients career development.
    • A critical response to Hooley’s Seven Cs of digital literacy.

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2018-04)
      This article will provide a critical analysis of Tristram Hooley’s Seven Cs of digital literacy. This analysis will be based on responses from the theoretical tradition of New Literary Studies (NLS) to digital literacy. The key findings of this article are that NLS points towards the Seven Cs, firstly, developing an autonomous view of knowledge and skills where learning is seen as separate from context and, secondly, which obscures forms of exclusion and inequality. Finally, this analysis will discuss an alternative basis for careers practice based on online pedagogy and critical investigation.
    • The diverse world of career guidance

      Chaluš, Jan; Koštálová, Helena; Kavková, Eva; Šindlerová, Ivana; Hooley, Tristram; Moore, Nicki; Artess, Jane; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Dimsits, Miriam; Clark, Karen Anne; et al. (Evropská Kontakní Skupina (EKS), 2017-06)
      This book is the product of an EU funded project involving parterns from The Czech Republic, Denmark and the United Kingdom. The book contains personal reflections of career guidance provision and activities in which theory and practice are united through the eyes of experienced practitioners from a range of guidance settings. This book is aimed at both established and new guidance practitioners
    • Entrepreneurship and UK doctoral graduates

      Hooley, Tristram; Bentley, Kieran; Marriott, John; University of Derby (IP Publishing, 2011-06-01)
      This paper discusses the experience of UK doctoral graduates in pursuing entrepreneurial careers: there is evidence that this applies to a substantial number - about 10% - of doctoral graduates. The nature of their experience was explored using 37 interviews with doctoral entrepreneurs. The research was funded by Vitae (www.vitae.ac.uk), an organization championing the personal, professional and career development of doctoral researchers and research staff in UK higher education. The stories that the participants tell suggest that doctoral entrepreneurship develops out of a complex interaction between the personality and skills of the entrepreneurs and the environment in which they operate. In particular, the authors argue that the participants have mobilized a mix of financial, social and educational capital in order to create and sustain their enterprises successfully.
    • Establishing Croatia’s lifelong career guidance service

      Moore, Nicki; Zećirević, Mirjana; Peters, Simon; University of Derby (NICEC, 2014-04-01)
      On July 1st 2013, Croatia became the 28th member state of the European Union. One requirement for Croatia’s accession to the EU was the establishment of comprehensive life-long career guidance (LLCG) provision. In 2011, the Croatian Employment Service, the traditional provider of career guidance services to the unemployed, embarked on a programme to establish eight public facing pilot LLCG centres funded through EU transition funding. This article uses the results of an early evaluation of the new LLCG centres undertaken at the end of the pilot stage to explore the inter-relationship between this EU imperative and the policy and practice developments required to establish LLCG in a post-conflict and post command economy emerging EU country.
    • Evaluating the Legacy Careers Project.

      Marriott, John; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014-03-18)
      The Legacy Careers Project was a five day programme of career enrichment activities for schools in East London. The programme ran from June to December 2013 with students moving from Year 8 to Year 9. It provided information and activities to support students to better understand their future career options. The project takes its inspiration from the Olympic Games and is informed by the opportunities offered by Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. This paper sets out the findings of an evaluation of the project conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. The evaluation concludes that the project was successful. Evaluators noted the delivery of an effective and coherent career learning programme that aligned well with best practice in the sector. Key indicators of success are as follows: • Students who participated in the programme reported that they enjoyed the experience and found it useful; • A high level of learning could be observed throughout the programme; • Students reported that they had developed their skills and attributes through the programme; • There was evidence of greater purposefulness in thinking about their next career destination; • The programme exceeded the initial target of 200 participants by providing 770 students (year 8, moving to year 9) and an additional 70 team leaders (year 12) with career enrichment activities outside of the classroom; • There was a high level of positive engagement from the schools involved in the programme; and • The programme also provided opportunities for a group of sixth form team leaders. These students also reported improvements in their self-confidence (53%), leadership skills (47%) and other skills and attributes.
    • Evaluation of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber Inspiration activity and good practice guide

      Artess, Jane; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (2017-03)
      The research suggests that Careers Yorkshire and the Humber (CYH) is continuing to make good progress in its inspiration work and fulfilling the expectations that it set itself in its Inspiration plans. Whilst celebrating its continuing achievements CYH is set on a journey of improvement and is actively seeking to continue to work collaboratively with partners, to make the most of its networks, to continue to provide impartial, labour market information and to grow the infrastructure to meet the needs of young people and their parents and advisers for reliable career-related information and support activities. The context for CYH’s inspiration work during 2016-2017 has become more complex as more organisations and services become available. This presents challenges but also opportunities which CYH appear to have grasped with enthusiasm.
    • The evidence base on lifelong guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (The European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN), 2014-10)
      THE PURPOSE OF THIS EVIDENCE GUIDE is to present the existing international research base on the impact of lifelong guidance, including its educational outcomes, economic and employment outcomes, and social outcomes. The guide has been prepared for ELGPN by Professor Tristram Hooley, International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, UK. It builds on the work undertaken by the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) during 2008–14, including the Quality-Assurance and Evidence-Base (QAE) Framework which provides an approach for policy-makers to address quality assurance and evidence-based policy and system development. The guide synthesises the existing impact evidence. It suggests that guidance is most effective when it is conceived as a lifelong system and that policy-makers should continue to develop this evidence base to ensure that policies are based on the best evidence available.
    • The evidence base on lifelong guidance (Brief Summary)

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-10)
      THE PURPOSE OF THIS EVIDENCE GUIDE is to present the existing international research base on the impact of lifelong guidance, including its educational outcomes, economic and employment outcomes, and social outcomes. The guide has been prepared for ELGPN by Professor Tristram Hooley, International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, UK. It builds on the work undertaken by the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) during 2008–14, including the Quality-Assurance and Evidence-Base (QAE) Framework which provides an approach for policy-makers to address quality assurance and evidence-based policy and system development. The guide synthesises the existing impact evidence. It suggests that guidance is most effective when it is conceived as a lifelong system and that policy-makers should continue to develop this evidence base to ensure that policies are based on the best evidence available.
    • The evidence base on lifelong guidance (Extended Summary)

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-10)
      THE PURPOSE OF THIS EVIDENCE GUIDE is to present the existing international research base on the impact of lifelong guidance, including its educational outcomes, economic and employment outcomes, and social outcomes. The guide has been prepared for ELGPN by Professor Tristram Hooley, International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, UK. It builds on the work undertaken by the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) during 2008–14, including the Quality-Assurance and Evidence-Base (QAE) Framework which provides an approach for policy-makers to address quality assurance and evidence-based policy and system development. The guide synthesises the existing impact evidence. It suggests that guidance is most effective when it is conceived as a lifelong system and that policy-makers should continue to develop this evidence base to ensure that policies are based on the best evidence available.
    • An experiment in blended career development: the University of Derby’s social media internship programme

      Longridge, Debra; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2012-10)
      It is possible to describe the capability of an individual to use the online environment to pursue their career as their digital career literacy. It is comprised of a range of different skills including the ability to: search; evaluate resources; communicate; network with other people; develop your reputation; and utilise an ever growing range of tools and environments as part of your career building. In another article in this edition of the NICEC journal Hooley (2012) has defined digital career literacy as encompassing changing, collecting, critiquing, connecting, communicating, creating and curating. This requires both the translation of offline skills and the development of new online ones. This article sets out the experience of running the social media internship programme (SMIP), an intervention to develop students’ digital career literacy at the University of Derby.