• Feminine men and masculine women: in/exclusion in the academy

      Atkins, Liz; Vicars, Mark; Northumbria University (Emerald, 31/03/2016)
      The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts of female masculinityto interrogate how hegemonic gendering discourses, forms and performances are inscribed in neoliberal narratives of competency in higher education in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on individual examples, the authors consider how these narratives are omnipresent in the sector, and systematically act to exclude those who do not conform. In doing so, the authors draw extensively on bodies of literature exploring gender/identity, and neo-liberalism. In particular, the paper draws on the work of Halberstam (1998, 2011), and of Drake (2015).There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. This paper examines neo-liberal practices from a more nuanced perspective than some traditional polarised critiques which regard gender as a binary. In doing so, it contributes to debates on masculinity, but more importantly, opens discussions about the implications of gendering discourses for the role of the few women in senior positions in higher education institutions globally.
    • Teaching Higher Education Courses in Further Education Colleges

      Tummons, Jonathan; Orr, kevin; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Sage, 30/05/2013)
      As the number of higher education (HE) courses offered in further education (FE) settings increases, so does the need for teachers and trainee teachers to develop their teaching skills. This text is written for all teachers and trainee teachers in FE. It considers what it means to teach HE in FE and how an HE environment can be created in an FE setting. The text covers day-to-day aspects of teaching including planning and assessment, giving guidance on the unique needs of HE students. Chapters on research and quality assurance support the reader in developing some advanced teaching skills. This is a practical guide for FE teachers and trainee teachers as the sector adapts to the needs of education today.
    • Creating feminized critical spaces and co-caring communities of practice outside patriarchal managerial landscapes

      Duckworth, Vicky; Lord, Janet; Dunne, Linda; Atkins, Liz; Watmore, Sue; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 29/01/2016)
      The experiences of five female lecturers working in higher education in the UK are explored as they engage in the search for a feminized critical space as a refuge from the masculinized culture of performativity in which they feel constrained and devalued. Email exchanges were used as a form of narrative enquiry that provided opportunity and space to negotiate identities and make meaning from experiences. The exchanges provided a critical space, characterised by trust, honesty and care for the self and for each other, that enabled a sharing of authentic voices and a reaffirming of identities that were made vulnerable through the exposing of the self as an emotional, politicised subject. Drawing on existing theoretical understandings of critical feminised spaces enabled us to create a pedagogical framework for work with students in further developing caring and co-caring communities of practice that are not alternative to, but are outside the performativity landscape of education.
    • Nothing changes: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 25/06/2015)
      This paper explores young people's perceptions of vocational education and training (VET) in England. It draws on interview and focus-group data from a funded project. Parallel studies were carried out in The Netherlands, South Africa and England. This study reports on the English project. It found that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others are most influential in choice of vocational programme and that young peoples' understandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age, programme level and subject area. Perceived attractiveness of VET was closely associated with societal perception of their programmes (which the young people considered to be negative). The paper considers the implications of these findings in the context of recent major policy initiatives in England. It concludes that, while some recent policy initiatives, such as the introduction of University Technical Colleges may be successful in raising the esteem of some forms of elite and specialized VET, broad vocational programmes at lower levels, and short courses associated with 'employability' and 're-engagement', will continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working-class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • Learning on the margins: Experiencing low level VET programmes in a UK context

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (AVETRA, 23/04/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context
    • Dis(en)abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Wiley, 23/03/2016)
      This article explores tensions between the policies and practice of inclusion and the lived experiences of disabled young people in education. Drawing on the narratives of two young men who participated in a small pilot study, it utilises theoretical concepts related to disability, structure and agency, and power and control, as it explores the ways in which inclusion can create subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) forms of exclusion. Focusing on the young men's experiences of further and higher education, it is argued that inclusive practices and policies, however well intentioned, can create new and subtle forms of marginalisation through the structures and discourse intended to address exclusion. I conclude by questioning whether, in a diverse and disparate society, in which all our lives are defined by the extent to which we are more or less equal than others, inclusion can ever be anything other than an illusory concept.
    • Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education

      Atkins, Liz; Duckworth, Vicky; Northumbria University (Bloomsbury, 21/02/2019)
      Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education offers researchers a full understanding of very important concepts, showing how they can be used a means to develop practical strategies for undertaking research that makes a difference to the lives of marginalised and disadvantaged learners. It explores different conceptualisations of social justice and equity, and leads the reader through a discussion of what their implications are for undertaking educational research that is both moral and ethical and how it can be enacted in the context of their chosen research method and a variety of others, both well-known and more innovative.
    • Leadership and ministry, lay and ordained: Insights from rural multi-church groups

      Weller, Paul; Artess, Jane; Sahar, Arif; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-07)
      This report examines and explores leadership challenges and opportunities in the setting of Christian ministry and witness within the rural multi-church context. The challenges arise from a combination of demographic and socio-economic challenges coupled with inherited building, operational structures and patterns of ordained ministry. It utilises in-depth literature review, semi-structured interviews and a mapping of training provision to establish the challenges and opportunities for rural multi-church contexts. A lack of confidence was identified as the biggest barrier in encouraging clergy and lay people to look at ministry and witness new ways to engage in learning and development opportunities. It is recognised that a one-size-fits all approach is not appropriate but consideration needs to be given to the extension of formal training courses at local level, short modular approaches and the informal approaches such as mentoring.
    • Pride and Prospects: Developing a socially just level 1 curriculum to enable more positive school to work transitions

      Atkins, Liz; University of Derby (iCEGS, 2019-06-19)
      This paper reports on an ongoing project, being conducted in Guernsey, which is evaluating the medium term impact of a new curriculum model designed to enable more successful, and less precrious transitions to work for young people undertaking broad vocational education at level 1. Careers Education and Guidance (CEG) forms a central plank of the curriculum, in response to earlier research (Bathmaker, 2001; Atkins, 2009; Atkins et al, 2015) suggesting that young people undertaking programmes at this level have aspirations similar to their higher achieving peers, but lack the support, and cultural and social capital to realise those aspirations. The paper highlights the particular challenges faced by these young people, of whom 33% became NEET in 2015/16 (Guernsey College data), with particular reference to their career aspirations and the ways in which these are supported by the college. The paper positions the study as research for social justice, rather than socially just research (Atkins and Duckworth, 2019), but draws on theoretical concepts of social justice to inform the conduct of the study (e.g. Lincoln and Denzin, 2013). Theoretically, it draws on, amongst others, the work of Bourdieu (e.g.1990) Bourdieu and Passeron (1990) , Hodkinson et al (1996) and Hodkinson (e.g. 1996; 1998; 2008).
    • Future Frontiers: The impact of career coaching on career readiness and indicators of successful transitions in Year 11 pupils.

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (Future Frontiers, 2019-06-07)
      Taking part in the Future Frontiers programme has significant and positive effects on all aspects of student’s career readiness. In particular, pupils showed significant increases in work readiness, career planning and thinking positively about school. These positive changes are equal or better to other career interventions for young people and their shifts in knowledge, skills and attitudes suggest they will be more able to transition into appropriate destinations post-16.
    • Introducing a fellowship scheme for the CDI

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (The Career Development Institute, 2019-06)
      The article outlines the process adopted and the outcomes for the development for a Fellowship programme within the Career Development Institute. It explores the rationale for adoption, the criteria for selection and strategy for progressing this new membership conferment.
    • Career guidance for social justice: contesting neoliberalism

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-05-22)
    • Quality Assurance Standards : A synthesis of quality standards across partner countries.

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; Haug, E.H.; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (University of Derby, 2019-05)
      This report presents an analysis of a range of transnational and national quality assurance (QA) practices in career guidance within partner countries, 21 quality activities were assessed. The report focuses on identifying the variety of different approaches, the factors that enable these approaches and the impact of these different approaches.
    • Quality Assurance Standards A synthesis of quality standards across partner countries. Summary report.

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hagaseth Haug, Erik; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (University of Derby, 2019-05)
      This report presents an analysis of a range of transnational and national quality assurance (QA) practices in career guidance within partner countries, 21 quality activities were assessed. The report focuses on identifying the variety of different approaches, the factors that enable these approaches and the impact of these different approaches.
    • Career guidance and the changing world of work: Contesting responsibilising notions of the future.

      Hooley, Tristram John; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-04-29)
      Career guidance is an educational activity which helps individuals to manage their participation in learning and work and plan for their futures. Unsurprisingly career guidance practitioners are interested in how the world of work is changing and concerned about threats of technological unemployment. This chapter argues that the career guidance field is strongly influenced by a “changing world of work” narrative which is drawn from a wide body of grey literature produced by think tanks, supra-national bodies and other policy influencers. This body of literature is political in nature and describes the future of work narrowly and within the frame of neoliberalism. The ‘changing world of work’ narrative is explored through a thematic analysis of grey literature and promotional materials for career guidance conferences. The chapter concludes by arguing that career guidance needs to adopt a more critical stance on the ‘changing world of work’ and to offer more emancipatory alternatives.
    • International approaches to quality in career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Competence Norway, 2019-04-10)
      This report explores the issue of quality and quality assurance in career guidance. It is based on six case studies which look at how different countries quality assure their career guidance provision. The aim of the study is to use these international examples to inform the development of a quality system for career guidance in Norway.
    • Decent work in the UK: Context, conceptualization, and assessment

      Dodd, Vanessa Nichole; Hooley, Tristram; Burke, Ciaran; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier, 2019-04-03)
      Access to decent work is an important goal for policymakers and for individuals navigating theirworking lives. Decent work is a career goal for individuals and a priority for many employers andpolicy makers seeking to promote social justice. Decent work forms part of the United Nationssustainable development goals and the International Labor Organisation's (ILO) Decent WorkAgenda. Thefindings of the Taylor Review (2017) have helped to prioritize decent work as apolicy aim for the current UK government.Although macro-level indicators have been well developed to monitor access to decent work,there have been few studies which attempt to understand decent work at the individual level. Asa result, our studies explore the measurement and definition of decent work in the UK. Study 1investigates whether the Decent Work Scale (DWS) is a valid measure for use in the UK and Study2 uses a qualitative approach to further understand what decent work means to working peoplein the UK. Study results may have implications for the assessment and conceptualization of de-cent work among this specific population.
    • Careers leadership in practice: a study of 27 careers leaders in English secondary schools

      Andrews, David; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-04-01)
      Historically, responsibility for career education and guidance in English schools was shared between the school and an external careers service. The Education Act 2011 transferred responsibility for career guidance to schools. Andrews and Hooley (2017) argued that for schools to successfully manage these new arrangements they require a ‘careers leader’. In this article, we report on research in 27 English state schools and multi-academy trusts where careers leadership currently exists. This research broadly endorses Andrews and Hooley’s typology of careers leadership tasks with the addition of a new task around securing funding. However, it is noted that the way in which these tasks are organised varies, with five models of careers leadership evident. The advantages and potential challenges of each model are outlined and implications for the training and professional development of careers leaders are discussed.
    • Evaluation of the INSPiRED teenager programme

      Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-04-01)
      The INSPiRED Teenager programme is a variant of the existing INSPiRED framework (RE -INSPiRED Professional and INSPiRED Team programmes) that was successfully developed and tested in 2015. The framework provides an easy to learn self or facilitated coaching process by which participants can conduct regular career reviews throughout their working life. INSPiRED Teenager in particular is grounded in helping parents and carers to enable their teenagers to identify a purpose and combine this with their potential to improve career clarity and confidence in a radically changing labour market. While research suggests some 70% of teenagers turn to their parents for help, and that 56% of parents feel ill-equipped to help, the world of work is continuing to change due to technological developments. In response to this, the INSPiRED Teenager programme was developed as many young people are now need to adapt, pivot and continually learn new skills as new careers and training routes open up. The evaluation set out to assess the effectiveness of the two delivery formats, the effectiveness of the programme in helping to improve teenagers’ career confidence and clarity, and the effectiveness of the programme to support parents/carers to have informed conversations with their teenagers about their future careers.
    • The different skills of apprentices and graduates

      Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-04)
      In recent research we have noticed a growing engagement with apprenticeships amongst ISE members. In our Student Development Survey 2019 employers report that on average they have scaled up their recruitment of apprentices by 56% since 2016, while the number of graduates has only increased by 9%. Only time will tell if this heralds a new era in student recruitment, but the fact that 58% of respondents say that they are developing apprentices to do work that would have previously been done by graduates suggests that times are changing. However, as the apprenticeship route develops it is important for employers to think carefully about when they should recruit graduates and when they should recruit apprentices.