• Feminine men and masculine women: in/exclusion in the academy

      Atkins, Liz; Vicars, Mark; Northumbria University (Emerald, 31/03/2016)
      The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts of female masculinityto interrogate how hegemonic gendering discourses, forms and performances are inscribed in neoliberal narratives of competency in higher education in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on individual examples, the authors consider how these narratives are omnipresent in the sector, and systematically act to exclude those who do not conform. In doing so, the authors draw extensively on bodies of literature exploring gender/identity, and neo-liberalism. In particular, the paper draws on the work of Halberstam (1998, 2011), and of Drake (2015).There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. This paper examines neo-liberal practices from a more nuanced perspective than some traditional polarised critiques which regard gender as a binary. In doing so, it contributes to debates on masculinity, but more importantly, opens discussions about the implications of gendering discourses for the role of the few women in senior positions in higher education institutions globally.
    • Teaching Higher Education Courses in Further Education Colleges

      Tummons, Jonathan; Orr, kevin; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Sage, 30/05/2013)
      As the number of higher education (HE) courses offered in further education (FE) settings increases, so does the need for teachers and trainee teachers to develop their teaching skills. This text is written for all teachers and trainee teachers in FE. It considers what it means to teach HE in FE and how an HE environment can be created in an FE setting. The text covers day-to-day aspects of teaching including planning and assessment, giving guidance on the unique needs of HE students. Chapters on research and quality assurance support the reader in developing some advanced teaching skills. This is a practical guide for FE teachers and trainee teachers as the sector adapts to the needs of education today.
    • Creating feminized critical spaces and co-caring communities of practice outside patriarchal managerial landscapes

      Duckworth, Vicky; Lord, Janet; Dunne, Linda; Atkins, Liz; Watmore, Sue; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 29/01/2016)
      The experiences of five female lecturers working in higher education in the UK are explored as they engage in the search for a feminized critical space as a refuge from the masculinized culture of performativity in which they feel constrained and devalued. Email exchanges were used as a form of narrative enquiry that provided opportunity and space to negotiate identities and make meaning from experiences. The exchanges provided a critical space, characterised by trust, honesty and care for the self and for each other, that enabled a sharing of authentic voices and a reaffirming of identities that were made vulnerable through the exposing of the self as an emotional, politicised subject. Drawing on existing theoretical understandings of critical feminised spaces enabled us to create a pedagogical framework for work with students in further developing caring and co-caring communities of practice that are not alternative to, but are outside the performativity landscape of education.
    • Nothing changes: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 25/06/2015)
      This paper explores young people's perceptions of vocational education and training (VET) in England. It draws on interview and focus-group data from a funded project. Parallel studies were carried out in The Netherlands, South Africa and England. This study reports on the English project. It found that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others are most influential in choice of vocational programme and that young peoples' understandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age, programme level and subject area. Perceived attractiveness of VET was closely associated with societal perception of their programmes (which the young people considered to be negative). The paper considers the implications of these findings in the context of recent major policy initiatives in England. It concludes that, while some recent policy initiatives, such as the introduction of University Technical Colleges may be successful in raising the esteem of some forms of elite and specialized VET, broad vocational programmes at lower levels, and short courses associated with 'employability' and 're-engagement', will continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working-class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • Learning on the margins: Experiencing low level VET programmes in a UK context

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (AVETRA, 23/04/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context
    • Dis(en)abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Wiley, 23/03/2016)
      This article explores tensions between the policies and practice of inclusion and the lived experiences of disabled young people in education. Drawing on the narratives of two young men who participated in a small pilot study, it utilises theoretical concepts related to disability, structure and agency, and power and control, as it explores the ways in which inclusion can create subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) forms of exclusion. Focusing on the young men's experiences of further and higher education, it is argued that inclusive practices and policies, however well intentioned, can create new and subtle forms of marginalisation through the structures and discourse intended to address exclusion. I conclude by questioning whether, in a diverse and disparate society, in which all our lives are defined by the extent to which we are more or less equal than others, inclusion can ever be anything other than an illusory concept.
    • Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education

      Atkins, Liz; Duckworth, Vicky; Northumbria University (Bloomsbury, 21/02/2019)
      Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education offers researchers a full understanding of very important concepts, showing how they can be used a means to develop practical strategies for undertaking research that makes a difference to the lives of marginalised and disadvantaged learners. It explores different conceptualisations of social justice and equity, and leads the reader through a discussion of what their implications are for undertaking educational research that is both moral and ethical and how it can be enacted in the context of their chosen research method and a variety of others, both well-known and more innovative.
    • Evaluating the impact of the Team Programme on the outcomes for student-alumni

      Dimitrellou, Eleni; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-12-12)
      This research explored the medium and long term impacts of thr Young Entreprise Programme 'Team' on young people who experience special educational needs and disabilities. It found that the programme is effective in helping students boost their confidence and enhance several enterprising skills such as communication skills, self-confidence, teamwork, monetary skills, self-improvement, and employability skills. Further, TP is successful in enabling students to improve other competences such as independent living skills, effective citizenship, the management of change and transitions, their understanding the world of work and media and digital literacy.
    • Recognising the changing labour market

      Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (Jisc/ Prospects, 2020-12)
    • I don’t think anyone here has thought about career really: What the concept of ‘career’ means to Norwegian teenagers and school counsellors

      Bakke, Ingrid Bårdsdatter; Hooley, Tristram; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-10-22)
      Norway is reforming its career guidance system. This article explores how these reforms are experienced in schools around Norway, and attends to the way in which the concept of ‘career’ is understood. There is a difference between an ‘everyday’ and a scholarly understanding of the concept, between seeing it as hierarchical, or viewing career more democratically. This study explores how these tensions are worked through by Norwegian young people and guidance counsellors. The article argues that this tension is pronounced because the concept of ‘career’ has entered Norway as part of a top down policy discourse. Consequently, there is a need to re-contextualise the ideas of career and career guidance to connect them with Norwegian culture.
    • Teacher professional learning through lesson study: teachers’ reflections

      Poultney, Val; Fox, Alison; University of Derby; The Open University (Emerald, 2020-10-15)
      This study examines the experiences of five teachers working in two English secondary school subject departments after being given the opportunity to engage with Lesson Study (LS) to increase student performance in their subject areas. This study aimed to reveal the drivers for the teachers’ engagement in LS, and how this experience of Joint Professional Development (JPD) might be contributing to their learning as teachers. This study application of a model of learning for analysis of teacher reflections on collaborative learning experiences. Understanding individual teacher reflections on LS experiences, are underrepresented in the literature in particular studies providing insights into conditions conducive and constraining to JPD.
    • 'It helps to have more strings to your bow’. Exploring the careers and success of graduates of the conservatoire for dance and drama

      Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Hooley, Tristram; CRAC / Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (CRAC, 2020-10)
      This report sets out the findings of a project exploring the careers pursued by the graduates from the Conservatoire of Dance and Drama. It finds that CDD graduates are positive about their experience of studying at the Conservatoire and that they frequently go on to paid work linked to their degree discipline. However, the experience of work for these graduates is likely to be of a portfolio career which links together a range of different jobs.
    • Listening to new voices in the career development field

      Albien, Anouk J.; Poulsen, Bo Kindt; Toiviainen, Sanna; Kekki, Miika; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (NICEC, 2020-10)
      This is an editorial for an issue of the Journal of the National Institute for Career Education and Counselling focusing on new and early career researchers, particularly those associated with the ECADOC programme.
    • Are young people aged 16-19 using or expecting to use the gig economy for their careers

      Galfalvi, Esther; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (NICEC, 2020-10)
      Amid growing precarity and zero hour contracts, the ‘gig economy’ represents a new way of working mediated by web technology. Workers can sign up to a work platform – a website or smartphone program that manages the work automatically – and take on work at the tap of a button. Some platforms manage labour, such as driving for Uber or delivering food for Deliveroo, while others manage retail activity, such as Ebay or Etsy. Recent research has shown that a significant number of people are using platform work to earn money, with over half being young people aged 16-34. While there are some data regarding satisfaction levels and attractors, there is little research examining specific age segments of workers, or the relationship between platform work and career. Using data from focus group interviews with school and Further Education college students, this paper will discuss findings from research investigating how young people in England aged 16-19 perceive the gig economy and whether they feel that it will be relevant to their careers, with a view to discussing whether it may be necessary to include in careers education programmes or guidance. The interview data indicate that these participants were occasionally using platforms to make money, and a few were earning regularly, usually on retail platforms. While some interviewees appreciated the autonomy and flexibility promised by gig economy work, the uncertainty, perceived low status, and lack of career progression prevented them from taking it seriously as a career option. Instead, they preferred traditional forms of work that provide more stability and organisational support - an increasingly rare commodity in a labour market that is changing rapidly in the opposite direction. We conclude that while there may be little value in giving detailed individual guidance on the gig economy, it could be valuable to use it as a way of teaching young people about the labour market and different types of employment
    • Celebrity scientists: Inspiration or just entertainment?

      Dent, Maria Fay; Radford, Neil; University of Derby (The Association for Science Education, 2020-09-30)
      This article explores perceptions of science students about the influence of celebrity science on their aspirations. Does celebrity science inspire? Their views are contrasted with those of five prominent celebrity scientists (including Sir David Attenborough and Baroness Susan Greenfield). Qualitative interviews revealed that whilst a key factor in science aspiration is personal interest, celebrity scientists were perceived as having the potential and responsibility to inspire young people. Authenticity and credibility, alongside entertainment, were seen as potentially optimising this influence. Implications for teacher educators are considered from the perspective of working with science teachers, scientists and celebrity scientists, with the concept of ‘message to a name’ being introduced as a supportive tool.
    • The role of digital technology in career development

      Hooley, Tristram; Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2020-09-02)
      This chapter analyses the role of digital technologies in career development. It argues that digital technologies change the context for individuals’ careers and the opportunities that exist for the provision of career support. The implications of digital technologies for career are dependent, in part, on how technologies are believed to interact with society. They may be thought of as tools, as shapers of society, or as social practices. For individuals, digital technologies can be understood through six metaphors: (1) library, (2) media channel, (3) surveillance camera, (4) marketplace, (5) meeting place, and (6) arena. For career development professionals, the choice is using them to provide information, automated interactions, or communication. The chapter concludes by arguing that there are three main pedagogic stances (instrumental, connectivist, or critical) that can guide career development professionals in the combination of different technologies and in the resolution of the opportunities and challenges that are presented to individuals in their career building.
    • Career development and human capital theory: Preaching the “education gospel”

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2020-09-02)
      This chapter analyses the relationship between career development, education, and human capital theory. It argues that education lies at the heart of our understanding of how individuals develop their careers and how purposeful career development interventions can support them in this endeavour. Career development services are most evident and accessible in the education system. This relationship is not accidental but is rooted in both the historical development of the field and in the importance of human capital theory to the ideology of both education and career development. The chapter finishes by critiquing the dependence of policymakers and advocates for the field on human capital theory and by considering alternative relationships that could be built between education and career development.
    • Addressing unrealistic optimism with counterfactual reasoning in an employability module in higher education

      Hanson, Jill; Burke, Ciaran; Univerity of West England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-09-01)
      The study aimed to explore the effect of second year business students engaging in counterfactual reasoning on their unrealistic optimism regarding attainment on an employability module. Using an experimental design, the study compared the module performance of those who generated reasons why they would and would not achieve a series of specific grades. A control group who did not generate any reasons also took part. Students who generated reasons why they would not achieve a good grade were less likely to be unrealistically optimistic and more likely to attain a good grade on their assessment. This is a small sample of students from one form of programme, so replication with a greater sample drawn from other programmes would increase reliability. The results suggest an easily applied and practical way of engaging students in employability modules to support their development of a range of capitals. The findings are considered in relation to the theory of possible selves, the value for students, particularly widening participation of students, of improved engagement with employability modules and the possibility of applying this technique in wider educational settings. This paper extends Hoch’s (1985) original study by considering the use of counterfactual reasoning for assessment performance and offering a an easy-to-apply tool for module leaders to support student attainment in employability development modules
    • The career development profession: Professionalisation, professionalism, and professional identity

      Gough, John; Neary, Siobhan; University of Warwick; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2020-09)
      This chapter examines the professionalisation of career development provision in countries across the world. ‘Professionalisation’ and ‘professionalism’ are explored through several concepts, including social closure, the professional project, and the regulatory bargain. The chapter argues that professionalism is a useful and important concept for the career development field but recognises the challenges that the field has had in achieving professional status. It recognises some of the critiques that exist of professionalism and explores how these relate to careers professionals. It then argues that increasing professionalism within the field needs to be understood as an ongoing process that has to be conducted on the personal, organizational, and professional level. The chapter concludes by outlining some key strategies that the field can use to advance the cause of professionalism in the future.