• Feminine men and masculine women: in/exclusion in the academy

      Atkins, Liz; Vicars, Mark; Northumbria University (Emerald, 31/03/2016)
      The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts of female masculinityto interrogate how hegemonic gendering discourses, forms and performances are inscribed in neoliberal narratives of competency in higher education in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on individual examples, the authors consider how these narratives are omnipresent in the sector, and systematically act to exclude those who do not conform. In doing so, the authors draw extensively on bodies of literature exploring gender/identity, and neo-liberalism. In particular, the paper draws on the work of Halberstam (1998, 2011), and of Drake (2015).There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. This paper examines neo-liberal practices from a more nuanced perspective than some traditional polarised critiques which regard gender as a binary. In doing so, it contributes to debates on masculinity, but more importantly, opens discussions about the implications of gendering discourses for the role of the few women in senior positions in higher education institutions globally.
    • Teaching Higher Education Courses in Further Education Colleges

      Tummons, Jonathan; Orr, kevin; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Sage, 30/05/2013)
      As the number of higher education (HE) courses offered in further education (FE) settings increases, so does the need for teachers and trainee teachers to develop their teaching skills. This text is written for all teachers and trainee teachers in FE. It considers what it means to teach HE in FE and how an HE environment can be created in an FE setting. The text covers day-to-day aspects of teaching including planning and assessment, giving guidance on the unique needs of HE students. Chapters on research and quality assurance support the reader in developing some advanced teaching skills. This is a practical guide for FE teachers and trainee teachers as the sector adapts to the needs of education today.
    • Creating feminized critical spaces and co-caring communities of practice outside patriarchal managerial landscapes

      Duckworth, Vicky; Lord, Janet; Dunne, Linda; Atkins, Liz; Watmore, Sue; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 29/01/2016)
      The experiences of five female lecturers working in higher education in the UK are explored as they engage in the search for a feminized critical space as a refuge from the masculinized culture of performativity in which they feel constrained and devalued. Email exchanges were used as a form of narrative enquiry that provided opportunity and space to negotiate identities and make meaning from experiences. The exchanges provided a critical space, characterised by trust, honesty and care for the self and for each other, that enabled a sharing of authentic voices and a reaffirming of identities that were made vulnerable through the exposing of the self as an emotional, politicised subject. Drawing on existing theoretical understandings of critical feminised spaces enabled us to create a pedagogical framework for work with students in further developing caring and co-caring communities of practice that are not alternative to, but are outside the performativity landscape of education.
    • Nothing changes: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 25/06/2015)
      This paper explores young people's perceptions of vocational education and training (VET) in England. It draws on interview and focus-group data from a funded project. Parallel studies were carried out in The Netherlands, South Africa and England. This study reports on the English project. It found that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others are most influential in choice of vocational programme and that young peoples' understandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age, programme level and subject area. Perceived attractiveness of VET was closely associated with societal perception of their programmes (which the young people considered to be negative). The paper considers the implications of these findings in the context of recent major policy initiatives in England. It concludes that, while some recent policy initiatives, such as the introduction of University Technical Colleges may be successful in raising the esteem of some forms of elite and specialized VET, broad vocational programmes at lower levels, and short courses associated with 'employability' and 're-engagement', will continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working-class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • Learning on the margins: Experiencing low level VET programmes in a UK context

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (AVETRA, 23/04/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context
    • Dis(en)abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Wiley, 23/03/2016)
      This article explores tensions between the policies and practice of inclusion and the lived experiences of disabled young people in education. Drawing on the narratives of two young men who participated in a small pilot study, it utilises theoretical concepts related to disability, structure and agency, and power and control, as it explores the ways in which inclusion can create subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) forms of exclusion. Focusing on the young men's experiences of further and higher education, it is argued that inclusive practices and policies, however well intentioned, can create new and subtle forms of marginalisation through the structures and discourse intended to address exclusion. I conclude by questioning whether, in a diverse and disparate society, in which all our lives are defined by the extent to which we are more or less equal than others, inclusion can ever be anything other than an illusory concept.
    • Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education

      Atkins, Liz; Duckworth, Vicky; Northumbria University (Bloomsbury, 21/02/2019)
      Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education offers researchers a full understanding of very important concepts, showing how they can be used a means to develop practical strategies for undertaking research that makes a difference to the lives of marginalised and disadvantaged learners. It explores different conceptualisations of social justice and equity, and leads the reader through a discussion of what their implications are for undertaking educational research that is both moral and ethical and how it can be enacted in the context of their chosen research method and a variety of others, both well-known and more innovative.
    • Understanding the use of digital technology in the career development sector

      Moore, Nicki; Czerwinska, Karolina; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12-04)
      This research, funded jointly by the UK’s Career Development Institute and the University of Derby, has been conducted at a time of rapid change in the availability and use of digital technologies. A recommendation to develop digital skills to harness technology is not new and was first suggested by The Careers Profession Task Force (2010). This research aims to determine what progress has been made over the last nine years since the recommendation was made and seeks to determine: • How practitioners and managers use digital technology to deliver career development services • The potential for digital technology to deliver career development services; and • The training needs of career development practitioners so that they can use digital technology to deliver services, innovate solutions and solve problems in service delivery. The knowledge developed through this research will be used to develop professional support and training activities and services to organisations and individual career development practitioners. It will also be used by policy makers in the UK and beyond, who are tasked with the development of modern, cost-effective and client appropriate career development services.
    • Icarus, grannies, black holes and the death of privacy: exploring the use of digital networks for career enactment

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2019-11-28)
      New perspectives on how digital networks can be understood as an environment for career enactment are explored in this article, in particular, through using critical perspectives on technology, especially in the context of prevailing instrumental perspectives in the majority of the career development literature. Thus, the narratives of people using digital networks for their careers were explored using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The results are captured in three main themes or critical discourses: the speed and scale of digital environments, game-like features of social media interactions and a divide between offline and online worlds. These are presented as sites for critical investigation and are aligned with technological and socio-cultural critical theories.
    • Leading change for survival: The rural flexi-school approach

      Poultney, Val; Anderson, Duncan; University of Derby (Sage, 2019-10-08)
      This article seeks to present the perspectives of three school leaders in one rural primary school in the English East Midlands, who, when faced with closure due to a falling student numbers, decided to offer and operate a flexi-schooling model of educational provision. We aim to find out, through a theoretical model of systems school leadership, how the school leadership team addressed this issue. Findings suggest that the principles of systems leadership, operating through an open systems model, have facilitated the journey towards flexi-schooling and ensured the survival and growth of the school. The learning community created with parents and the personalisation of the curriculum for learners reflects an innovative curriculum design and in part solves the problems which led to the initial decision taken by parents to home-educate. Focusing on ways to secure healthy student numbers, school leaders developed a partnership with a multi-academy trust, yet they still face challenges in formally recording student numbers when their attendance is only part of the week
    • Pop-up shops for increasing employability and contributing to civil society in times of austerity

      Hill, Inge; Bass, Tina; Coventry University (Springer, 2019-09-24)
      This chapter discusses a learning and teaching unit pop-up shop rooted in experiential learning. This pop-up shop learning activity aims to increase employability and educate young learners how to contribute to civil society. The discussion offers a reflection on how lecturers’ roles are changing in response to the austerity informed UK policies and HE measures. Universities are increasingly required to generate larger numbers of enterprising, employment-ready graduates. Increased monitoring of the efficient use of public spending in HE has seen the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) bringing more focus on employability rates, which in turn help to determine university rankings. These rankings put pressure on HE senior management, which is then passed down through the hierarchy to lecturers. The detailed guidance on how to run pop-up shops offers a pragmatic answer to the outlined challenges to inspire lecturers to develop their learning and teaching strategies. Particular attention is paid to developing reflective skills in learners.
    • Why higher apprenticeships are critical to business

      Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (Open Access Government, 2019-09-06)
    • Leading change for survival: the rural flexi-school approach

      Poultney, Val; Anderson, Duncan; University of Derby (BELMAS, 2019-08-19)
      Nestled in the Staffordshire moorlands, a small rural school appointed a Head Teacher, who also served as teacher, for a school community of 5 children in 2010. Shortly afterwards, the school was earmarked for closure. Passionate for the school to remain open, the Head Teacher sought to adopt a flexi-schooling approach. The school is now at capacity with just under 50 children, most of whom have previously been home educated or school refusers. Carnie (2017) describes flexi-schooling as an agreed contract and partnership whereby the school and family agree responsibilities for the education of the children concerned. It is characterised in part by there being no unique location for education. Parents, according to Neuman & Guterman (2019) are important and active participants in the education of their children. They have a clear educational role working in close collaboration and partnership with the school, where the home environment is central to the teaching process
    • Leadership and ministry, lay and ordained: Insights from rural multi-church groups

      Weller, Paul; Artess, Jane; Sahar, Arif; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-07)
      This report examines and explores leadership challenges and opportunities in the setting of Christian ministry and witness within the rural multi-church context. The challenges arise from a combination of demographic and socio-economic challenges coupled with inherited building, operational structures and patterns of ordained ministry. It utilises in-depth literature review, semi-structured interviews and a mapping of training provision to establish the challenges and opportunities for rural multi-church contexts. A lack of confidence was identified as the biggest barrier in encouraging clergy and lay people to look at ministry and witness new ways to engage in learning and development opportunities. It is recognised that a one-size-fits all approach is not appropriate but consideration needs to be given to the extension of formal training courses at local level, short modular approaches and the informal approaches such as mentoring.
    • Pride and Prospects: Developing a socially just level 1 curriculum to enable more positive school to work transitions

      Atkins, Liz; University of Derby (iCEGS, 2019-06-19)
      This paper reports on an ongoing project, being conducted in Guernsey, which is evaluating the medium term impact of a new curriculum model designed to enable more successful, and less precrious transitions to work for young people undertaking broad vocational education at level 1. Careers Education and Guidance (CEG) forms a central plank of the curriculum, in response to earlier research (Bathmaker, 2001; Atkins, 2009; Atkins et al, 2015) suggesting that young people undertaking programmes at this level have aspirations similar to their higher achieving peers, but lack the support, and cultural and social capital to realise those aspirations. The paper highlights the particular challenges faced by these young people, of whom 33% became NEET in 2015/16 (Guernsey College data), with particular reference to their career aspirations and the ways in which these are supported by the college. The paper positions the study as research for social justice, rather than socially just research (Atkins and Duckworth, 2019), but draws on theoretical concepts of social justice to inform the conduct of the study (e.g. Lincoln and Denzin, 2013). Theoretically, it draws on, amongst others, the work of Bourdieu (e.g.1990) Bourdieu and Passeron (1990) , Hodkinson et al (1996) and Hodkinson (e.g. 1996; 1998; 2008).
    • Future Frontiers: The impact of career coaching on career readiness and indicators of successful transitions in Year 11 pupils.

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (Future Frontiers, 2019-06-07)
      Taking part in the Future Frontiers programme has significant and positive effects on all aspects of student’s career readiness. In particular, pupils showed significant increases in work readiness, career planning and thinking positively about school. These positive changes are equal or better to other career interventions for young people and their shifts in knowledge, skills and attitudes suggest they will be more able to transition into appropriate destinations post-16.
    • Nudge theory: should career development practitioners have a position?

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2019-06-01)
      This article considers the ethical issues of applying nudge theory in the career development sector.
    • Introducing a fellowship scheme for the CDI

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (The Career Development Institute, 2019-06)
      The article outlines the process adopted and the outcomes for the development for a Fellowship programme within the Career Development Institute. It explores the rationale for adoption, the criteria for selection and strategy for progressing this new membership conferment.
    • Career guidance for social justice: contesting neoliberalism

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-05-22)
    • Quality Assurance Standards : A synthesis of quality standards across partner countries.

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hooley, Tristram; Haug, E.H.; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (University of Derby, 2019-05)
      This report presents an analysis of a range of transnational and national quality assurance (QA) practices in career guidance within partner countries, 21 quality activities were assessed. The report focuses on identifying the variety of different approaches, the factors that enable these approaches and the impact of these different approaches.