• Its in their nature to nurture: a comparison of PCE mentors perception of their role and the emerging national requirements

      Wallace, Sue; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (01/09/2006)
      This paper explores the ways in which subject specialist mentors perceive their role and thereby their professional development needs - in terms of their responsibility for the observation of teaching practice in post-compulsory education settings. It suggests that their role as the mentors perceive it is not consistent with, or limited to, that which is implied in the emerging model of post-compulsory teacher training. Its findings further suggest that the training available for professionals undertaking this largely unpaid role is both limited and variable and that there is minimal engagement with the support which is available. The paper argues that a lack of coherence has led to an inequitable situation where students on post-compulsory Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses receive variable support which impacts on their student experience and professional development. The investigation, based on a range of initiatives, resources and approaches developed during 2005/2006 as part of a DfES pilot study involving Nottingham Trent University (NTU), Lincoln College and Stamford College, makes recommendations for developments in local and national practice, and in government policy.
    • Qualitative research in education

      Wallace, Sue; Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (Sage, 01/01/2012)
      This accessible and practical book is a perfect quick guide for postgraduate researchers in education. Looking at the interdependence of teaching and research, the authors show that a critical and analytical exploration of policies and practices is a necessary part of what we mean by being a 'professional' in education. This co-authored book is structured around a range of methods applicable to educational research and appropriate for use by practitioners at all stages of their professional development. It takes recognisable, 'real life' scenarios as its starting point for each discussion of method, so that readers are able to start from the known and familiar. As well as exploring theoretical aspects of research method, each chapter provides practical tasks and points for discussion and reflection. These approaches, taken together, are designed to build confidence and encourage reader engagement and enjoyment.