• A beacon for guidance : how the International Centre for Guidance Studies has been influencing policy and practice for 16 years

      Hyde, C.; University of Derby, iCeGS; East Midlands Oral History Archive (iCeGS University of Derby, 2014-06)
      The publication documents the history of the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby. It focuses on how the centre has influenced policy and practice in the careers sector over the last 16 years.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring. Executive Summary.

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Can aspiration kill local community? Challenges for young people and career practitioners in Sri Lanka

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2013-10)
      Raising aspiration is a primary focus of careers work. However, in some circumstances enhanced aspirations may create tensions in situations of limited accessible opportunity. Additionally focusing on the autonomy of the individual and their choice can impact more broadly on local community. This article will explore the importance of locating career guidance in context, specifically in relation to some of the issues facing career practitioners working in Sri Lanka. These practitioners seek to inspire young people to a range of careers whilst remaining conscious of the individual and local impacts that may result. It will consider the concept of 'foundation' which encompasses the physical, social, religious and spiritual, cultural and political environment and the role this might play in providing a holistic model for career guidance.
    • A career postcode lottery? Local authority provision of youth and career support following the 2011 Education Act

      Langley, Emma; Hooley, Tristram; Bertuchi, Denise; University of Derby; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014-01-15)
      Since the election of the Coalition Government, England has seen a major change in the delivery of career support for young people. Cuts in funding for Connexions, Aimhigher and Education Business Partnerships have been accompanied by a shift in statutory responsibility from local authorities (LAs) to schools. Such policy has been criticised by a wide range of stakeholders and subjected to some scrutiny. This study focuses attention on the experiences of LAs and their staff in dealing with these changes. The aim was to explore the current scale and nature of LA careers activities with a view to providing a picture of LA responses to the policy changes. The report explores several themes: the resourcing of career and youth support, the provision of universal career support, and how targeted services have been affected. It also discusses the implications of the changes on specific groups such as careers professionals and young people, and suggests ways forward.
    • A careers adviser? so what do you do exactly?

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2011-11)
      This paper aims to explore and examine how professional identity is defined within career guidance in England in the wake of ongoing change. It considers the components and the factors that contribute to the formation of professional identity, and the relationship with postgraduate continuing professional development (CPD). The study draws on the perceptions of a group of England-based practitioners broadly representing the sector, but bounded by one common factor; they have all undertaken a postgraduate qualification focusing on CPD within a guidance related discipline.
    • The global graduate: developing the global careers service

      Neary, Siobhan; Thambar, N.; Bell, Sharon; University of Derby, iCeGS (CRAC, 2014-04)
      Graduate employability is an international issue. Students seek a higher education experience with added value in terms of employability and an international perspective. How do careers services meet the expectations that accompany these aspirations? The University of Nottingham, an established global university with campuses in Malaysia and China, attracts students from across the world. These students have diverse and culturally-specific career development needs, requiring skilled practitioners with knowledge of the global graduate opportunity structure. This article explores ways in which the Careers and Employability Services are being developed to meet a global market through support for staff and internationalised employer engagement.
    • I am here to learn biology, not 'personal development': testing the blueprint for Careers

      Neary, Siobhan; Beizsley, Celia; University of Derby, iCeGS; University of Derby, Career Development Centre (2012-10-09)
      University careers services in the UK are increasingly challenged to contribute to ensuring graduates find, obtain and engage with graduate level opportunities. Parallel to this the range of graduate opportunities has become increasingly competitive. All universities strive to identify and promote their added value to the academic experience. The Blueprint for Careers (LSIS, 2011a) builds on international practice in developing career management competencies. It offers a useful framework, which can be used by careers professionals to work with students and academics to review and assess the attainment of career competencies. This multi-layered research project utilised an on-line questionnaire, student peer researcher training and focus groups to engage a sample of students across all faculties of the university. The indicative findings present a mixed picture, with students generally feeling most confident about their attitudes to lifelong learning, and how changes in society impact on life, learning and work. Areas of least confidence focused on the ability to make effective career and life decisions and planning and managing life, learning and work. In relation to programme provision students welcomed opportunities to engage in extra curricular activities but demanded more focused and relevant work experience opportunities.
    • The international symposia on career development and public policy: retrospect and prospect

      Watts, A. G.; Bezanson, L.; McCarthy, John; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014)
      Between 1999 and 2011, seven international symposia on career development and public policy were held at various venues across the world, and an International Centre was established to support and maintain continuity between these events. These developments were closely intertwined with a number of other significant international developments. The origins of the symposia are described; their core design features are defined; their evolution is outlined and reviewed; and their impact is assessed. This article concludes with a discussion of the prospects for future symposia and for the International Centre.
    • Making use of icould: learning from practice

      Moore, Nicki; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby, iCeGS (2015-03-30)
      icould, is an online careers resource which provides individual’s with access to the work and life experiences of hundreds of people in the form of online careers films. The films are supplemented with labour market information and other resources. This approach seeks to provide both a self-directed resource for career explorers and a resource that can be used by career and education professionals to enhance their practice. In addition, icould provides a range of information, games, interactive activities and other resources that can also be used either directly by a career explorer or as underpinning resources for professionals working in the field. icould is a technically innovative product which utilises multi-media content, interactivity and social media in new ways to provide career support. icould has become popular with career professionals and other educators and is frequently used as part of the delivery of career support. icould has produced a very useful suite of resources for teachers to facilitate its use in practice. However, up until now there has been no investigation of the ways that icould is actually being used in practice. Consequently in this project we sought to draw this practice together and to present it in a way that might stimulate, inform and inspire future practice. To do this a diverse group of practitioners were recruited to form a community of practice (COP). This report provides new ideas and insights into the way which the icould website is used by practitioners.
    • Professional Identity : what I call myself defines who I am

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (Career Development Institute, 2014-06)
      The article explores professional identity and the the contributors that contribute to this. It particularly focuses on the roles of job titles and CPD in contributing to defining how practitioners see themselves within a professional context.
    • Project JUST/2011/Frac/AG/2716-"WE: Wor(l)ds which exclude-National Report UK"

      Tracada, Eleni; Spencer, Siobhan; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, Faculty of Art, Design & Technology; Derbyshire Gypsy Liaison Group; University of Derby, iCeGS (2014-04)
    • Tackling unemployment, supporting business and developing careers

      Hooley, Tristram; Devins, David; Watts, A. G.; Hutchinson, Jo; Marriott, John; Walton, Fiona; University of Derby, iCeGS; Leeds Metropolitan University, Policy Research Institute (PRI) (UKCES, 2012-05)
      The issue of unemployment remains high on the political agenda. However, there is evidence that employers can be wary of employing people who are out of work. Employer practice is key, both in terms of providing employment opportunities to job seekers, and in providing space for low-skilled people to develop their skills and cement their attachment to the labour market. This report discusses the role of career guidance in mediating between job seekers and employers to allow both to achieve their objectives.
    • Talking about career: the language used by and with young people to discuss life, learning and work

      Moore, Nicki; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby, iCeGS (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby., 2012-04-25)
      This report describes the findings of research conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby on behalf of the national HE STEM programme. The research set out to understand how young people conceptualise career vocabulary in order to help those tasked with supporting their career decision making to do so in a way which was both engaging and effective. The research found that there is considerable confusion about a range of career vocabulary both amongst young people themselves and between young people and the adults who seek to influence and inform their careers. This report has also argued that confusion about vocabulary cannot simply be solved by teaching young people the “correct” meaning of different words. The report explores the relationship between the words that we use to talk about career and the way that we think about career. In particular it examines how the different vocabulary and conceptions of career held by young people and adults complicate the career learning that takes place both in school and outside of school. The report notes that current policy suggests that schools are going to have to take increasing levels of control over careers education and a key element of this is supporting teachers and other adults working with young people to talk more effectively about careers and related issues. The report argues that it is important that career educators attend to the career literacy levels of learners and pay close attention to the career vocabularies that they utilise. In particular an argument is made that those young people who are considering STEM careers have additional vocabulary and concepts to learn that relate to the disciplines and sectors within which STEM careers are pursued. The report explores how people talk about career and identifies a range of factors that are likely to influence this. It demonstrates that there is considerable diversity in the ways in which people define and use a word like “career”. It notes that people often use metaphors to describe the concept of career and identifies a wide range of different metaphors that people use. As with the choice of particular vocabulary, the choice of metaphor suggests different ideas about career which educators are likely to want to explore and, at times, challenge. The research was conducted during autumn 2011 and involved interviews with 82 young people, and nine career helpers from schools and organisations largely based in the Midlands. This is a small scale study and the results are therefore presented to open up debate and thinking in this area and do not constitute an exhaustive exploration of the subject. The main findings of the research are presented under five headings each of which represents a major theme of the research.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-12)
      This Concept Note discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways: • Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation. • Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in workbased learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability. • Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within work-based learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • The Youth Guarantee and lifelong guidance

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; National Labour Office, Hungary; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2013-10)
      The European Youth Guarantee is an initiative to help link young people aged 16 - 14 to the labour market across all member states. The paper is a Concept Note commissioned by the policy network to explore how guidance activities are being implemented in a range of ways across national youth support programmes and includes practical evidence from 17 member countries. The paper contends that successful and sustainable implementation of the Youth Guarantee Initiative can only be secured through effective integration of lifelong guidance practice into national programmes.