• The 21st Century HE Careers Professional

      Thambar, Nalayini; Neary, Siobhan; Zlatic, Franka; University of Nottingham; University of Derby (Higher Education Careers Service Unit, 2021-02-17)
      The role of HE careers services have been increasingly influenced over the last ten years or so. The research aimed to explore how various drivers, metrics such as the National Student Survey (NSS), Destinations of Leavers of Higher Education (DLHE), Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) and the introduction of higher fees have impacted practitioners and their services over the last decade. The methodology adopted a qualitative approach including, a focus group, an online survey and in-depth interviews with a sample of services representing Pre and Post 92, Russell Group and Specialist HE. Throughout the course of the research, the COVID-19 Pandemic erupted which impacted on the nature of the research project. The research identified that Careers Professionals defined their role as providing support to students in their career development and planning, including the navigation of recruitment processes. They achieve this through working directly with the students on a 1:1 basis, recognising the resource-intensity yet value of this approach, and also through the delivery of workshop activity. Alongside this, the role typically involves increased and increasing activity to embed careers education within, or to align with, the curriculum. Institutional interest in employability and resulting structures means that a growing number of careers professionals’ roles are based in a Faculty or another part of their institution such as a Graduate School, in some cases being employed directly by them rather than the Careers Service itself. This decentralization was often linked to supporting departments in achieving higher NSS and other employability related metrics.
    • Are young people aged 16-19 using or expecting to use the gig economy for their careers

      Galfalvi, Esther; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (NICEC, 2020-10)
      Amid growing precarity and zero hour contracts, the ‘gig economy’ represents a new way of working mediated by web technology. Workers can sign up to a work platform – a website or smartphone program that manages the work automatically – and take on work at the tap of a button. Some platforms manage labour, such as driving for Uber or delivering food for Deliveroo, while others manage retail activity, such as Ebay or Etsy. Recent research has shown that a significant number of people are using platform work to earn money, with over half being young people aged 16-34. While there are some data regarding satisfaction levels and attractors, there is little research examining specific age segments of workers, or the relationship between platform work and career. Using data from focus group interviews with school and Further Education college students, this paper will discuss findings from research investigating how young people in England aged 16-19 perceive the gig economy and whether they feel that it will be relevant to their careers, with a view to discussing whether it may be necessary to include in careers education programmes or guidance. The interview data indicate that these participants were occasionally using platforms to make money, and a few were earning regularly, usually on retail platforms. While some interviewees appreciated the autonomy and flexibility promised by gig economy work, the uncertainty, perceived low status, and lack of career progression prevented them from taking it seriously as a career option. Instead, they preferred traditional forms of work that provide more stability and organisational support - an increasingly rare commodity in a labour market that is changing rapidly in the opposite direction. We conclude that while there may be little value in giving detailed individual guidance on the gig economy, it could be valuable to use it as a way of teaching young people about the labour market and different types of employment
    • The ‘Blueprint’ framework for career management skills: a critical exploration

      Hooley, Tristram; Watts, A. G.; Sultana, Ronald G.; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2013)
      This article examines the Blueprint framework for career management skills as it has been revealed across sequential implementations in the USA, Canada and Australia. It is argued that despite its lack of an empirical basis, the framework forms a useful and innovative means through which career theory, practice and policy can be connected. The framework comprises both core elements (learning areas, learning model and levels) and contextual elements (resources, community of practice, service delivery approach and policy connection). Each of these elements is explored.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring. Executive Summary.

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Can aspiration kill local community? Challenges for young people and career practitioners in Sri Lanka

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2013-10)
      Raising aspiration is a primary focus of careers work. However, in some circumstances enhanced aspirations may create tensions in situations of limited accessible opportunity. Additionally focusing on the autonomy of the individual and their choice can impact more broadly on local community. This article will explore the importance of locating career guidance in context, specifically in relation to some of the issues facing career practitioners working in Sri Lanka. These practitioners seek to inspire young people to a range of careers whilst remaining conscious of the individual and local impacts that may result. It will consider the concept of 'foundation' which encompasses the physical, social, religious and spiritual, cultural and political environment and the role this might play in providing a holistic model for career guidance.
    • The career development profession: Professionalisation, professionalism, and professional identity

      Gough, John; Neary, Siobhan; University of Warwick; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2020-09)
      This chapter examines the professionalisation of career development provision in countries across the world. ‘Professionalisation’ and ‘professionalism’ are explored through several concepts, including social closure, the professional project, and the regulatory bargain. The chapter argues that professionalism is a useful and important concept for the career development field but recognises the challenges that the field has had in achieving professional status. It recognises some of the critiques that exist of professionalism and explores how these relate to careers professionals. It then argues that increasing professionalism within the field needs to be understood as an ongoing process that has to be conducted on the personal, organizational, and professional level. The chapter concludes by outlining some key strategies that the field can use to advance the cause of professionalism in the future.
    • A career in career - understanding what career looks like in the career development sector

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Cotterill, Vicky; University of Derby (The Career Development Institute, 2017-01)
      There is little known about the careers workforce in the UK. This research focuses on developing a better understanding of who chooses to become a career development practitioner, their motivation, the transferable skills they bring with them and how they see their career developing. Although respondents represent a snapshot of practitioners it identified that the workforce is female, ageing and lacks diversity. Respondents felt their was a lack of career development within the sector with mainly management available for progression.
    • A careers adviser? so what do you do exactly?

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2011-11)
      This paper aims to explore and examine how professional identity is defined within career guidance in England in the wake of ongoing change. It considers the components and the factors that contribute to the formation of professional identity, and the relationship with postgraduate continuing professional development (CPD). The study draws on the perceptions of a group of England-based practitioners broadly representing the sector, but bounded by one common factor; they have all undertaken a postgraduate qualification focusing on CPD within a guidance related discipline.
    • Careers work in higher education in Pakistan: current practice and options for the future

      Zahid, Gulnaz; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-31)
      In this article we examine the development of career guidance in Pakistani higher education. The article is primarily based on a review of the existing literature on career guidance in Pakistan, but also includes the consideration of some new data gathered from a review of higher education institutions websites and five case study interviews. It considers both local and global influences as relevant contexts for understanding how the development of career guidance in Pakistani higher education is taking place. Concerns about alignment between skills supply and demand provide key drivers both for the development of career guidance and for wider higher education reform. However the practice of career guidance in Pakistani higher education is shown to be lagging behind the policy aspirations, both due to limited investment and due to more fundamental cultural challenges that have yet to be fully addressed. If career guidance is going to continue to develop within Pakistan it will need to be strengthened by new policy and resources but also through the development of indigenous theories.
    • Challenges to recruitment for the career development sector

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (Career Development Institute, 2018-10)
      In spring 2018 the Career Development Institute (CDI) together with the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby undertook research with employers in the career development sector to assess current workforce needs. This was prompted by anecdotal evidence suggesting a shortage of careers professionals and challenges to recruitment in many areas of the UK. This research suggests that pay and conditions, geography and access to affordable training are impacting on the skills and capability of the sector.
    • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Executive summary

      Moore, Nicki; Clark, Lewis; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
      This is the executive summary which sets out the findings of European research undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
    • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Final report

      Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
      This report sets out the findings of an Erasmus funded pan-Euopean research project which investigated the impacts on young peoples career decisions. The research was undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
    • Diversifying the careers workforce: opportunities and challenges

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (De Gruyter, 2020-01-20)
      Attracting high quality candidates with relevant and pertinent experience to any profession is often a challenge. A UK based research project is presented that employs a protean lens to examine the motivations and expectations of career changers who have recently moved into the fi eld of career guidance and counselling. The research comprised of a mixed methods design, utilising an online self-completed survey and interviews aimed at practitioners who have transitioned into the careers fi eld over the last fi ve years. The data refl ects practitioners working in a range of settings including, schools, further education colleges and higher education. The initial fi ndings present several important issues for the careers fi eld in the UK which may have wider applicability. Respondents transitioned from a diverse range of professional backgrounds including HR, education management consultancy and research. A common motivation focused on supporting and infl uencing a social justice agenda. The research identifies that the field is successful in recruiting highly qualifi ed and experienced candidates, the challenge is about diversity and attracting a workforce that better reflects the populace.
    • Employers' experience of Higher Apprenticeships: benefits and barriers

      Mieschbuehler, Ruth; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (iCeGS, University of Derby and Pera Training, Melton Mowbray, 2015)
      This report explores employers’ experience and understanding of Higher Apprenticeships. It is based on a survey of almost 200 companies and follow-up interviews with eleven employers. The findings suggest that there is strong support for Higher Apprenticeships amongst employers although there are many employers who have yet to engage with this programme. Employers that have implemented Higher Apprenticeships report a range of business benefits, but they were also clear that appropriate funding has to be in place to support these programmes. Employers generally thought that the introduction of Higher Apprenticeships would improve employee retention, help them to train people in the way they thought necessary and would enhance their company’s skills base. Barriers that had mitigated against the introduction of Higher Apprenticeships included the cost of introducing a Higher Apprenticeship programme, the work needed in making the business ‘higher apprentice friendly’ and findings appropriate apprenticeship frameworks and training providers. Companies that had successfully embedded Higher Apprenticeships had typically developed an approach to recruitment which enabled them to identify and select the best apprentices. Companies also set up management processes to ensure that higher apprentices were well supported and able to progress and developed effective partnerships with training providers.
    • Enhancing professionalism - progressing the career development sector

      Johnson, Claire; Neary, Siobhan; Career Development Institute; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling (NICEC), 2015-10)
      Much has changed in the career development sector since the launch of the Careers Profession Task Force report, ‘Towards a Strong Careers Profession’ in 2010. The report made recommendations for enhancing the professionalism of the career sector including the establishment of an overarching professional body, new qualification levels and common professional standards. The Careers Profession Alliance (CPA) and then the Career Development Institute (CDI), launched in April 2013 have striven to facilitate the sector to be stronger and more cohesive by addressing these recommendations. This article explores what was needed, what has been achieved and plans for the future.
    • An evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of good career guidance

      Hanson, Jill; Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; University of Debry (University of Derby, 2021-03-01)
      This report presents the findings of a four year (2016-2019) formative and summative evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of Good Career Guidance. It uses quantitative and qualitative data collected from school and college staff, learners and stakeholders, as well as Gatsby Benchmark self-audit data, financial data and data pertaining to learner attendance, attainment and destinations. It describes the progress made by the sixteen pilot education providers in achieving the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, explores the approaches they took to achieving the Benchmarks and considers the barriers and enablers they faced. The impacts of their work in delivering the Gatsby Benchmarks on learners, staff, local stakeholders and national policy and practice are presented. The findings indicate that significant progress in achieving all eight Benchmarks can be made by all kinds of education providers within two years and that this has a significant and observable effect on learners with respect to their career readiness, their interactions with teaching staff and employers, their engagement in the classroom and on attainment.
    • Flexible professional development.

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Council of British International Schools, 2018-06)
      Keeping up to date with what is happening in professional practice is always a challenge. We all struggle to find time as we try to juggle the competing commitments we have on a day to day basis. Ironically those of us who work helping others to develop and plan their careers are often the worst! We can always find time to help students think about what their next step will be, but we are less good at doing this for ourselves.
    • The Gatsby benchmarks and social mobility: impacts to date

      Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (IAEVG, 2020-03)
      Young people face a lengthening transition from education to the world of work. The average age that young people leave full-time education has been rising for over a century. Within the education system they are frequently asked to make choices about subject, institution and qualifications that will exert a profound influence on their future lives. This is an issue for all young people and is particularly concerning because social capital is a significant influence on careers. Some young people can lack the social capital to develop an awareness of careers and labour markets, decision making around careers and progression routes available to them through education and training. They can then be at risk of being outperformed by their more advantaged peers when building their careers. This paper discusses recent developments in policy and career strategy in England for young people and the extent to which career strategy is moving away from being a marginalised policy area. It examines a recent pilot which has operationalised elements of the recent career strategy for young people and an evaluation which explores how career guidance, as an all-inclusive measure, is being used to impact positively on learners in the short, medium and long term.
    • The global graduate: developing the global careers service

      Neary, Siobhan; Thambar, N.; Bell, Sharon; University of Derby, iCeGS (CRAC, 2014-04)
      Graduate employability is an international issue. Students seek a higher education experience with added value in terms of employability and an international perspective. How do careers services meet the expectations that accompany these aspirations? The University of Nottingham, an established global university with campuses in Malaysia and China, attracts students from across the world. These students have diverse and culturally-specific career development needs, requiring skilled practitioners with knowledge of the global graduate opportunity structure. This article explores ways in which the Careers and Employability Services are being developed to meet a global market through support for staff and internationalised employer engagement.