• Careers 2020: options for future careers work in English schools.

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Watts, A. G.; Coiffait, Louis; University of Derby (Pearson, 2012-11-01)
      Careers work in English schools has endured much turbulence recently. The government has now established a statutory duty on schools to secure provision, placing commissioning of careers advice and guidance in the hands of schools rather than local authorities or central government. But the duty is framed very loosely, comes with no funding and offers no clear model of provision. The previous funding for face-to-face guidance from qualified careers advisers has been removed, as has the duty for schools to provide careers education. So what should schools’ careers offers look like in future? How can schools ensure the quality of the career development support that is so vital for young people, and particularly so for those who cannot rely on their existing networks for advice and opportunities?
    • Creating an evidence base to support the development of a holistic approach to working with children and young people in Derbyshire: a local authority case study on the integration of social pedagogy in children and young people’s services

      Chavaudra, Nicole; Moore, Nicki; Marriott, John; Jakhara, Mohammed; University of Derby (ThemPra Social Pedagogy and the Centre for Understanding Social, 2014-12)
      Derbyshire County Council Children and Younger Adult’s Directorate has been undergoing a social pedagogy learning journey. Local research has identified that where social pedagogy underpins the activities offered to vulnerable children and those in residential care settings the outcomes for these groups are improved. Research suggests that there is a growing appetite for a programme of workforce development in social pedagogical approaches. A growing body of research suggests that whilst training in this area is valued and has impact, it should not result in a new professional identity, that of social pedagogue. Rather the principles and concepts should be embedded in the existing roles of a range of practitioners and stakeholders working with children and young people. As a result of these insights a new accredited programme is being developed in Derbyshire in partnership with the University of Derby which will be offered to 100 practitioners drawn from across the range of the children’s and young people’s workforce. This new approach will be the focus of new research which monitors the impact of the training on the behaviours of practitioners and the outcomes for children. This article offers insights into process and thinking which surrounds the new strategy.
    • Entrepreneurship and UK doctoral graduates

      Hooley, Tristram; Bentley, Kieran; Marriott, John; University of Derby (IP Publishing, 2011-06-01)
      This paper discusses the experience of UK doctoral graduates in pursuing entrepreneurial careers: there is evidence that this applies to a substantial number - about 10% - of doctoral graduates. The nature of their experience was explored using 37 interviews with doctoral entrepreneurs. The research was funded by Vitae (www.vitae.ac.uk), an organization championing the personal, professional and career development of doctoral researchers and research staff in UK higher education. The stories that the participants tell suggest that doctoral entrepreneurship develops out of a complex interaction between the personality and skills of the entrepreneurs and the environment in which they operate. In particular, the authors argue that the participants have mobilized a mix of financial, social and educational capital in order to create and sustain their enterprises successfully.
    • Evaluating the Legacy Careers Project.

      Marriott, John; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014-03-18)
      The Legacy Careers Project was a five day programme of career enrichment activities for schools in East London. The programme ran from June to December 2013 with students moving from Year 8 to Year 9. It provided information and activities to support students to better understand their future career options. The project takes its inspiration from the Olympic Games and is informed by the opportunities offered by Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. This paper sets out the findings of an evaluation of the project conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. The evaluation concludes that the project was successful. Evaluators noted the delivery of an effective and coherent career learning programme that aligned well with best practice in the sector. Key indicators of success are as follows: • Students who participated in the programme reported that they enjoyed the experience and found it useful; • A high level of learning could be observed throughout the programme; • Students reported that they had developed their skills and attributes through the programme; • There was evidence of greater purposefulness in thinking about their next career destination; • The programme exceeded the initial target of 200 participants by providing 770 students (year 8, moving to year 9) and an additional 70 team leaders (year 12) with career enrichment activities outside of the classroom; • There was a high level of positive engagement from the schools involved in the programme; and • The programme also provided opportunities for a group of sixth form team leaders. These students also reported improvements in their self-confidence (53%), leadership skills (47%) and other skills and attributes.
    • Fostering college and career readiness: how career development activities in schools impact on graduation rates and students' life success

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Sampson, James P.; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2011-07-01)
      This paper sets out the recent evidence around career development. This evidence is examined within the context of the college and career readiness agenda. The argument is made that in order for young people to be genuinely “ready” for both college and career they need to have attended to their academic achievement, their aspirations and plans for the future, their ability to make transitions and their ability to direct their own careers. It is argued that career development offers schools a body of practice that has been shown to have a positive impact on young people’s readiness for college and career. The report acknowledges that the provision of career development has been in decline in many North American schools despite evidence of its effectiveness. Given the current instability of the labor market, the increasing complexity of the education system and the need to grow the skills base of the workforce in a competitive global market, failing to attend to young people’s careers seems shortsighted. As this paper shows, there is a strong body of evidence which demonstrates that career development activity in schools can help young people to experience academic achievement, successfully transition to the labor market and live happier and more productive lives. It is hoped that setting out the evidence in this area of research will provide policy makers and school leaders with the resources required to make informed decisions and to support the development of the future generations of talent. The paper explores the impacts of career development in relation to four main questions: • Does career development engage young people in their schooling and help keep them attending school? • Does career development positively impact on young people’s academic achievement? • Does career development assist young people in making successful transitions to college or the labor market? • Does career development have a positive effect on people’s career and life success?
    • Higher Education outreach to widen participation: toolkits for practitioners. Evaluation.

      Dent, Phil; Garton, Elizabeth; Hooley, Tristram; Leonard, Christopher; Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), 2013-12)
      The toolkits are a distillation of the learning, methods and resources developed by Aimhigher and the Lifelong Learning Network programmes to support the effective strategy, management and delivery of outreach work to encourage progression to higher education for under-represented groups. The toolkits recontextualise the learning from these programmes to fit the current higher education environment. The toolkits form a suite of four . They include: • Toolkit 1 Partnership • Toolkit 2 Targeting • Toolkit 3 Programmes • Toolkit 4 Evaluation • Resources and Glossary. This is the second and updated edition, the first edition of the Toolkits was published in December 2012.
    • Higher Education outreach to widen participation: toolkits for practitioners. Overview

      Dent, Phil; Garton, Elizabeth; Hooley, Tristram; Leonard, Christopher; Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), 2013-12)
      The toolkits are a distillation of the learning, methods and resources developed by Aimhigher and the Lifelong Learning Network programmes to support the effective strategy, management and delivery of outreach work to encourage progression to higher education for under-represented groups. The toolkits recontextualise the learning from these programmes to fit the current higher education environment. The toolkits form a suite of four (see links to right). They include: • Toolkit 1 Partnership • Toolkit 2 Targeting • Toolkit 3 Programmes • Toolkit 4 Evaluation • Resources and glossary.This is the second and updated edition, the first edition of the Toolkits was published in December 2012.
    • Higher Education outreach to widen participation: toolkits for practitioners. Partnership.

      Dent, Phil; Garton, Elizabeth; Hooley, Tristram; Leonard, Christopher; Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), 2013-12)
      The toolkits are a distillation of the learning, methods and resources developed by Aimhigher and the Lifelong Learning Network programmes to support the effective strategy, management and delivery of outreach work to encourage progression to higher education for under-represented groups. The toolkits recontextualise the learning from these programmes to fit the current higher education environment. The toolkits form a suite of four.They include: • Toolkit 1 Partnership • Toolkit 2 Targeting • Toolkit 3 Programmes • Toolkit 4 Evaluation • Resources and glossary.This is the second and updated edition, the first edition of the Toolkits was published in December 2012.
    • Higher Education outreach to widen participation: toolkits for practitioners. Programmes.

      Dent, Phil; Garton, Elizabeth; Hooley, Tristram; Leonard, Christopher; Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), 2013-12)
      The toolkits are a distillation of the learning, methods and resources developed by Aimhigher and the Lifelong Learning Network programmes to support the effective strategy, management and delivery of outreach work to encourage progression to higher education for under-represented groups. The toolkits recontextualise the learning from these programmes to fit the current higher education environment. The toolkits form a suite of four.They include: • Toolkit 1 Partnership • Toolkit 2 Targeting • Toolkit 3 Programmes • Toolkit 4 Evaluation • Resources and glossary.This is the second and updated edition, the first edition of the Toolkits was published in December 2012.
    • Higher Education outreach to widen participation: toolkits for practitioners. Resources and glossary.

      Dent, Phil; Garton, Elizabeth; Hooley, Tristram; Leonard, Christopher; Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), 2013-12)
      These toolkits are a distillation of the learning, methods and resources developed by Aimhigher and the Lifelong Learning Network programmes to support the effective strategy, management and delivery of outreach work to encourage progression to higher education for under-represented groups. The toolkits recontextualise the learning from these programmes to fit the current higher education environment. The toolkits form a suite of four. They include: • Toolkit 1 Partnership • Toolkit 2 Targeting • Toolkit 3 Programmes • Toolkit 4 Evaluation • Resources and glossary.This is the second and updated edition, the first edition of the Toolkits was published in December 2012.
    • Higher Education outreach to widen participation: toolkits for practitioners. Targeting.

      Dent, Phil; Garton, Elizabeth; Hooley, Tristram; Leonard, Christopher; Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), 2013-12)
      The toolkits are a distillation of the learning, methods and resources developed by Aimhigher and the Lifelong Learning Network programmes to support the effective strategy, management and delivery of outreach work to encourage progression to higher education for under-represented groups. The toolkits recontextualise the learning from these programmes to fit the current higher education environment. The toolkits form a suite of four. They include: • Toolkit 1 Partnership • Toolkit 2 Targeting • Toolkit 3 Programmes • Toolkit 4 Evaluation • Resources and glossary.This is the second and updated edition, the first edition of the Toolkits was published in December 2012.
    • HR strategies for researchers: a review of the HR Excellence in Research Award implementation activities across Europe

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Pearce, Ellen; University of Derby (Careers Research and Advisory Centre (CRAC), 2013-05-24)
      This report explores how research institutions and funders across Europe are approaching the researcher HRM, particularly in response to the European Commission’s initiative to provide the HR Excellence in Research Award for organisations demonstrating their practical commitment to the principles set out in the Charter and Code.
    • NHBC Foundation: improving recruitment of young people into home building : a compendium of resources

      Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2014-12-18)
      This document is a resource of home building and construction related careers and promotional material for young people seeking to work in the sector. It is organised under general careers resources, home building specific resources, construction and STEM resources. The resources are organised under the organisation providing the resource, name of the scheme they offer, the target sector and age group it is aimed at the type of resource and description.
    • NHBC Foundation: improving recruitment of young people into home building : a literature review

      Marriott, John; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2014-12-18)
      This literature review was undertaken to support research into young people's attitudes to careers in house building. The review is based on database searches supplemented by the evidence gathered during stakeholder interviews and through requests made to the wider careers and home building sectors. In order to fully answer the main research questions, the literature mapping the barriers faced by young people to working within the sector was explored. Based on the review a set of criteria for analysing and categorising industry sector initiatives will also be developed. The criteria will be presented as a separate compendium of opportunities.
    • Social pedagogy: a scoping project for Derbyshire County Council; summary report

      Moore, Nicki; Jakhara, Mohammed; Bowie, John; Marriott, John; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-06)
      Derbyshire County Council (DCC) is committed to promoting positive outcomes for children and young people who are ‘Looked After’. The Authority has found that promoting a social pedagogical approach appears to have a positive impact for stakeholders. In autumn 2012 representatives from DCC’s Children and Younger Adults department met with a team of University of Derby staff from the faculty of Education Health and Sciences (EHS) to discuss the potential to further promote and embed social pedagogy into the daily worng practice of DCC staff and carers. It was agreed that an initial research project to ascertain the potential for training in social pedagogy for DCC employees was a necessary component for achieving this aim. The project involved a range of research approaches including a desk based review of literature, a number of face to face, telephone and group interviews, and an online survey. In total 209 Individuals participated in the research including managers, practitioners and foster carers. This report presents a summary of the findings of the research including a number of options and recommendations for developing an approach to teaching and training the County’s children and young people’s workforce in this aspect of their professional practice.
    • Tackling unemployment, supporting business and developing careers

      Hooley, Tristram; Devins, David; Watts, A. G.; Hutchinson, Jo; Marriott, John; Walton, Fiona; University of Derby, iCeGS; Leeds Metropolitan University, Policy Research Institute (PRI) (UKCES, 2012-05)
      The issue of unemployment remains high on the political agenda. However, there is evidence that employers can be wary of employing people who are out of work. Employer practice is key, both in terms of providing employment opportunities to job seekers, and in providing space for low-skilled people to develop their skills and cement their attachment to the labour market. This report discusses the role of career guidance in mediating between job seekers and employers to allow both to achieve their objectives.
    • Understanding a ‘career in careers’: learning from an analysis of current job and person specifications

      Neary, Siobhan; Marriott, John; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014-07)
      The Career Development Institute (CDI) is developing a career progression pathway for the career development sector. This report provides evidence which can inform the creation of such a framework. It is based on an analysis of 214 job and person specifications. These were drawn from all four UK nations and reflect the five CDI constituency groups as well as higher education and the welfare to work sector. Key findings include the following: It was possible to identify six levels of vacancies in the career development sector: entry level; practitioner; advanced practitioner; manager and senior manager; and research and technical support. There were careers vacancies in every UK nation and in every English region. Nearly half of the vacancies were located in London and the South East. Over three-quarters of the job opportunities for the career development workforce were located within careers companies and the education sector. Just less than three quarters of the vacancies were full time positions. A clear majority of vacancies (69%) were permanent positions. Three-quarters of vacancies specified a careers qualification. Many job and person specifications either did not specify the level of the qualification or suggested diverse careers qualifications at different levels. A minority of vacancies did not require any qualifications and a small number did not require any specific careers qualifications. Job and person specifications set out a wide range of duties for careers workers. The most common were providing one to one career information, advice and guidance and organising and delivering group sessions. The behaviour, knowledge and skills most likely to be specified were interpersonal skills, the use of ICT and electronic systems (including CRM systems) and the ability to manage paperwork and work to targets. Salaries varied from £13,400 to £65,000 although the overwhelming majority of those that specified a salary were between £15,001- £35,000. Salary varied according to the level of the job, the sector it was based in and the qualifications that were required. The analysis revealed 103 different job titles. This is a significant increase on the 2009 mapping by LLUK which identified 43 job roles. Careers adviser/advisor was the job title most commonly cited.
    • Understanding how people choose to pursue taught postgraduate study

      Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; University of Derby (HEFCE, 2014-04)
    • What is online research?: using the Internet for Social Science research

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Wellens, Jane; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2012-06)
      Online research is perhaps the most obvious but also the most difficult of research methods. What is Online Research? is a straightforward, accessible introduction to social research online. The book covers the key issues and concerns for all social scientists, with sections on research design, ethics and good practice. Short, clear case studies are used throughout to allow students to see examples of the research in practice. Wide ranging and interdisciplinary, What is Online Research Methods? shows researchers how to engage in the online environment in innovative ways, and points the way forward for future research.