• Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring. Executive Summary.

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Careering through the Web: the potential of Web 2.0 and 3.0 technologies for career development and career support services

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (UKCES, 2011-12-21)
      This paper examines the environment that the web provides for career exploration. Career practitioners have long seen value in engaging in technology and the opportunities offered by the internet, and this interest continues. However, this paper suggests that the online environment for career exploration is far broader than that provided by public-sector careers services. In addition to these services, there is a wide range of other players including private-sector career consultants, employers, recruitment companies and learning providers who are all contributing to a potentially rich career exploration environment.
    • Effective transitions for Year 8 students

      Morgan, Sandra; Hutchinson, Jo; Crompton, Nicole; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2007)
      With increased choice and flexibility in the curriculum at Key Stage (KS) 4, Year 9 students will be required to make decisions that could have implications for their future progression and career choices. The provision of good quality information, advice and guidance (IAG) from Year 7 onwards is, therefore, crucial. This project aimed to establish the extent to which current careers education and guidance (CEG) provision in Years 7 and 8 is effectively equipping students with the key skills they need to make realistic choices and successful transitions in Year 9. The research indicated concerns around the decision making skills gaps, variable quality of experiences, the role of mediation of key information, and the potential for personalised support.
    • Enhancing choice? The role of technology in the career support market

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (UKCES, 2010-12)
      This report explores the role that technology has played in the development of the career support market. This market is conceived broadly to include all possible resources that individuals might draw upon to support them in their career development. A key element is the role that is played by public-sector career services and by careers professionals; though these resources are supplemented by services paid for in a wide range of ways and delivered by a range of professionals and non-professionals.
    • Enthusiasm Trust and Community Space Challenge: impact evaluation

      Moore, Nicki; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2012-12)
      The aims of research were:- • To build a body of evidence of impact regarding environmental volunteering services on young people, and on the community • To provide an overview of the types of young people who have participated in the past • To document aspects of previous projects that encourage young people to participate and to achieve, and those that discourage young people from participation or from sustained engagement • To identify the key resources that underpinned successful project delivery • To identify specific achievements of young people that are attributable to the programme
    • Good timing: Implementing STEM careers strategy in secondary schools

      Finegold, Peter; Stagg, Peter; Hutchinson, Jo; Isinglass Consultancy; Warwick University; University of Derby (Centre for Education and Industry, University of Warwick, 2011)
      Good Timing is the final report of a three-year programme of work, commissioned by the Department for Education, and carried out by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick (CEI), the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby (iCeGS) and Isinglass Consultancy Ltd. The programme explored potential to embed STEM careers awareness in the early stages of secondary education.
    • More questions than answers: the role of practitioner research in professional practice.

      Neary, Siobhan; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby (Institute of Career Guidance, 2011-12-14)
      The concept of the career guidance practitioner viewing themselves as a professional is currently being challenged (Colley and Lewin, 2008; Greer, 2009). During the last decade there has been a concerted effort to support practitioners in engaging with research both as an agent and as a recipient to enhance practice and to drive forward the concept of the professional. This paper presents examples of progress within this endeavour and the views of practitioners who have engaged in research activities, either as part of their role or as dedicated continuing professional development (CPD). Throughout this paper we explore the role of research within the concepts of profession and professional practice; drawing on literature and primary research that captures views from two groups of practitioners. That careers guidance is a profession is an assumed reality for many practitioners and the organisations that represent them (and our own stance is that it is indeed a profession and we refer to it as such throughout this paper).
    • Tackling unemployment, supporting business and developing careers

      Hooley, Tristram; Devins, David; Watts, A. G.; Hutchinson, Jo; Marriott, John; Walton, Fiona; University of Derby, iCeGS; Leeds Metropolitan University, Policy Research Institute (PRI) (UKCES, 2012-05)
      The issue of unemployment remains high on the political agenda. However, there is evidence that employers can be wary of employing people who are out of work. Employer practice is key, both in terms of providing employment opportunities to job seekers, and in providing space for low-skilled people to develop their skills and cement their attachment to the labour market. This report discusses the role of career guidance in mediating between job seekers and employers to allow both to achieve their objectives.
    • Understanding advancement

      Ravenhall, Mark; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2009)
      The concept of ‘advancement’ has been central to the debate in relation to the most effective ways of achieving the twin policy goals of high employment alongside high productivity. It is based on how the system looks from the perspective of the individual who often faces multiple barriers in accessing both learning and work. In this way it is linked to the wider agenda of the personalisation of public services. What is different from other approaches is that advancement is also about how support for (and challenge to) the individual is delivered holistically. This involves bringing together what are currently discrete and disparate advice services for: housing, employment, learning, health and benefits/personal finances.This paper explores how the vision of advancement has advanced since first mooted in this context in John Denham’s Fabian Society speech in 2004. It looks at the reform agenda from three perspectives: • The individual; • The workplace; and • The advancement agencies which support them. It concludes by looking at ways of achieving advancement and government’s role in the process through strategic commitments to – segmentation; stimulation; regulation; and capacity building.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2014-12)
      This Concept Note discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways: • Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation. • Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in workbased learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability. • Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within work-based learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • Work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies across Europe

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; Social Service Agency of Georgia; University of Derby (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 2016-09)
      This paper is a re-presentation of work undertaken for the European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network on work-based learning and lifelong guidance policies which discusses the relationship between lifelong guidance and work-based learning. While these are distinct activities, they are often advanced as approaches to answering similar broad policy challenges, such as developing a skilled and socially inclusive population, ensuring engagement with education and work, and helping people to progress and live happy and useful lives. This paper argues that lifelong guidance can be particularly useful in relation to work-based learning in three main ways:  Engagement. Increasing citizens’ understanding of work-based learning, the routes into it and the rewards of participation.  Achievement. Helping participants (learners, employers and learning providers) in work-based learning to remain engaged and consider how best to enhance their skills and employability.  Transition. Assisting the effective utilisation of the skills developed within workbased learning by supporting individuals in transitions from work-based learning programmes to sustainable employment.
    • The Youth Guarantee and lifelong guidance

      Borbély-Pecze, Tibor Bors; Hutchinson, Jo; National Labour Office, Hungary; University of Derby, iCeGS (European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network, 2013-10)
      The European Youth Guarantee is an initiative to help link young people aged 16 - 14 to the labour market across all member states. The paper is a Concept Note commissioned by the policy network to explore how guidance activities are being implemented in a range of ways across national youth support programmes and includes practical evidence from 17 member countries. The paper contends that successful and sustainable implementation of the Youth Guarantee Initiative can only be secured through effective integration of lifelong guidance practice into national programmes.