• Addressing unrealistic optimism with counterfactual reasoning in an employability module in higher education

      Hanson, Jill; Burke, Ciaran; Univerity of West England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-09-01)
      The study aimed to explore the effect of second year business students engaging in counterfactual reasoning on their unrealistic optimism regarding attainment on an employability module. Using an experimental design, the study compared the module performance of those who generated reasons why they would and would not achieve a series of specific grades. A control group who did not generate any reasons also took part. Students who generated reasons why they would not achieve a good grade were less likely to be unrealistically optimistic and more likely to attain a good grade on their assessment. This is a small sample of students from one form of programme, so replication with a greater sample drawn from other programmes would increase reliability. The results suggest an easily applied and practical way of engaging students in employability modules to support their development of a range of capitals. The findings are considered in relation to the theory of possible selves, the value for students, particularly widening participation of students, of improved engagement with employability modules and the possibility of applying this technique in wider educational settings. This paper extends Hoch’s (1985) original study by considering the use of counterfactual reasoning for assessment performance and offering a an easy-to-apply tool for module leaders to support student attainment in employability development modules
    • Book review: Research methods for ssocial justice and equity in education

      Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-15)
      This is a review of the book "Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education" by Liz Atkins and Vicky Duckworth.
    • Business games and enterprise competitions. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Cox, Annette; Hooley, Tristram; The Careers and Enterprise Company; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-11-03)
      This paper provides the underpinning evidence on business games and enterprise competitions. Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying possible impacts from business games and enterprise competitions and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • Business games and enterprise competitions. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Cox, Annette; University of Derby (Careers and Enterprise Company, 2017-09)
      This paper provides the underpinning evidence on business games and enterprise competitions. Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying possible impacts from business games and enterprise competitions and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • A career in career - understanding what career looks like in the career development sector

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Cotterill, Vicky; University of Derby (The Career Development Institute, 2017-01)
      There is little known about the careers workforce in the UK. This research focuses on developing a better understanding of who chooses to become a career development practitioner, their motivation, the transferable skills they bring with them and how they see their career developing. Although respondents represent a snapshot of practitioners it identified that the workforce is female, ageing and lacks diversity. Respondents felt their was a lack of career development within the sector with mainly management available for progression.
    • Evaluation of Careers Yorkshire and the Humber Inspiration activity and good practice guide

      Artess, Jane; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (2017-03)
      The research suggests that Careers Yorkshire and the Humber (CYH) is continuing to make good progress in its inspiration work and fulfilling the expectations that it set itself in its Inspiration plans. Whilst celebrating its continuing achievements CYH is set on a journey of improvement and is actively seeking to continue to work collaboratively with partners, to make the most of its networks, to continue to provide impartial, labour market information and to grow the infrastructure to meet the needs of young people and their parents and advisers for reliable career-related information and support activities. The context for CYH’s inspiration work during 2016-2017 has become more complex as more organisations and services become available. This presents challenges but also opportunities which CYH appear to have grasped with enthusiasm.
    • An evaluation of the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire collaborative outreach programme

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-05)
      In the East Midlands the NCOP consortia is the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme (DANCOP) which is a progression of NEMCON (North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network) and is comprised from several universities and colleges of further education. DANCOP’s initial two goals were: 1. Raise learners’ motivation to work hard and their understanding of the importance of education in their future: 2. Equip learners to plan for progression and make appropriate choices for post-16 study and HE. This report includes an extensive review of literature on widening access, collaboration and networks and details a formative and summative evaluation undertaken by The International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) using data collected from February 2017 to May 2019. It reports on the progress made by DANCOP up until April 2019 with respect to: 1. The development of the collaborative network 2. The extent to which schools and learners have been engaged 3. The perceived impact of activities on learners, feedback from learners, teachers and parents and distance travelled with respect to knowledge/attitudes/intentions pertaining to future options and in particular higher education 4. Innovations in collaborative working and widening access The evaluation has captured data from surveys, interviews and focus groups from DANCOP team members, management group members, learners, teaching and school staff, session deliverers and third party providers. KEY FINDINGS 1. The network is well established amongst the HEIs, external stakeholders and FE colleges 2. DANCOP has surpassed its targets with respect to school engagement and learner interactions 3. It took a long time to establish the central and hub teams and recruit college based roles, partly because of the policies and processes inherent in HEIs and FECs but also because of non-competitive salaries and short term contracts. 4. It took a long time to build awareness in schools and develop good working relationships so that activities could be delivered. In short term funded programmes this is a problem. 5. DANCOP could work more quickly if legal, recruitment and financial issues and executive sign off could be facilitated. 6. Collaborative work has been supported by: a. Representation of key partners across different management groups b. The structural and physical location of teams and individuals c. An agile Steering Group and inclusion of further education colleges through the IPG d. ‘Blended Professionals’ who have significant experience, knowledge and skills and are able to cross boundaries to get work done 7. Key innovations have been the IPG, a small but agile steering group and using funding for longer term resources such as skills study coaches in colleges and the STEM Centre. 8. With respect to activities, feedback has been almost entirely positive, and this includes learners, teachers, DANCOP staff funded roles and parents. This has been the case across the wide range of different activities which have been delivered, across year groups and across delivery teams. 9. Activity evaluations show participants report significant increases in knowledge about HE and confidence. 10. Comparisons of knowledge, attitudes and intentions between DANCOP and non DANCOP learners suggest there have been the desired changes in DANCOP learners. They have shown increased likelihood of attending FE and HE, increased sense of academic fit, increased confidence and increased knowledge of HE.
    • An evaluation of the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme: interim evaluation.

      Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-10-24)
      The Context The National Collaborative Outreach Programme (NCOP) was developed to support the Government in meeting three goals: 1. Double the proportion of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds in higher education (HE) by 2020 2. Increase by 20 per cent the number of pupils in HE from ethnic minority groups 3. Address the under-representation of young men from disadvantaged backgrounds in HE. In the East Midlands the NCOP consortia is the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme (DANCOP) which is a progression of NEMCON (North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network) and is comprised from several universities and colleges of further education. DANCOP’s initial two goals were: 1. Raise learners’ motivation to work hard and their understanding of the importance of education in their future: 2. Equip learners to plan for progression and make appropriate choices for post-16 study and HE. Aim/Methods This interim report includes an extensive review of literature on widening participation, collaboration and networks and details a formative evaluation undertaken by The International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) using data collected from February 2017 to March 2018. It reports on the progress made by DANCOP up until March 2018 with respect to: 1. The development of an effective collaborative network 2. The extent to which schools have been engaged 3. The nature of student feedback received so far and distance travelled with respect to knowledge/attitudes/intentions pertaining to future options and in particular higher education 4. Innovations in collaborative working and widening participation The formative evaluation has so far captured data from surveys, interviews and focus groups from DANCOP team members, management group members, students and third party providers. Key Findings 1. The network is well established amongst the HEIs, external stakeholders and some FE colleges 2. FE colleges are facing an unprecedented upheaval with significant changes to the sector, pressures on staff to meet targets, mergers and redundancies. In this difficult and uncertain climate some of the college partners have been unable to engage effectively in the partnership. 3. It has taken a long time to establish the central and hub teams, primarily because of the policies and processes inherent in HEIs and FECs. Additionally it takes a long time to build awareness in schools and develop good working relationships so that WP activities can be delivered. The project life span needs to be extended for its full potential to be realised and for impacts to be properly evaluated. 4. DANCOP could work more quickly if legal issues and executive sign off could be facilitated. Dealing with the implications of GDPR has taken a lot of capacity. 5. Collaborative work has been supported by: a. Representation of key partners across different management groups b. The structural and physical location of teams and individuals c. An agile Steering Group d. ‘Blended Professionals’ who have significant experience, knowledge and skills and are able to cross boundaries to get work done 6. DANCOP has been able to engage with a large number of learners although these have tended to be located in a small number of schools. At March 2018 the majority of interactions had been delivered through the third party provider IntoUniversity. Year 11 students were the year group who have had the most engagement with activities. 7. Innovative approaches to WP can be seen already but some may not be eligible for the funding or able to demonstrate specific impacts which may be at a cost to pupils. 8. Initial feedback, both quantitative and qualitative, from pupils indicates that activities are perceived positively. The activities, in the short term at least, have a favourable impact on levels of knowledge, confidence, intentions to attend and motivation to work hard Recommendations 1. That the lifespan of the initiative is increased significantly in order to meet targets and evaluate long term impact. 2. That NCOP provides legal advice and support regarding elements such as data sharing agreements. 3. That there is more efficacious system for executive sign off on contracts for projects. 4. That colleges and hubs consider how to integrate their team members both within the institution (i.e. located structurally and physically within appropriate departments) and with each other to facilitate support, communication and collaboration. 5. That DANCOP produces a shared calendar of events for hubs and central team members. There might also be an internal online forum for all partners and members of teams to access in order to share best practice, challenges and develop resolutions. The Final Report Will include data from more students, teaching and SLT staff, Governance Board members, all third party providers and follow ups with the DANCOP team. Additionally it will include analyses of the CFE survey data from October 2017 and September 2018 to examine shift in knowledge, attitudes and intentions over time. Finally it will include case studies on innovative widening participation activities
    • An evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of good career guidance

      Hanson, Jill; Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; University of Debry (University of Derby, 2021-03-01)
      This report presents the findings of a four year (2016-2019) formative and summative evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of Good Career Guidance. It uses quantitative and qualitative data collected from school and college staff, learners and stakeholders, as well as Gatsby Benchmark self-audit data, financial data and data pertaining to learner attendance, attainment and destinations. It describes the progress made by the sixteen pilot education providers in achieving the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, explores the approaches they took to achieving the Benchmarks and considers the barriers and enablers they faced. The impacts of their work in delivering the Gatsby Benchmarks on learners, staff, local stakeholders and national policy and practice are presented. The findings indicate that significant progress in achieving all eight Benchmarks can be made by all kinds of education providers within two years and that this has a significant and observable effect on learners with respect to their career readiness, their interactions with teaching staff and employers, their engagement in the classroom and on attainment.
    • Future Frontiers: The impact of career coaching on career readiness and indicators of successful transitions in Year 11 pupils.

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (Future Frontiers, 2019-06-07)
      Taking part in the Future Frontiers programme has significant and positive effects on all aspects of student’s career readiness. In particular, pupils showed significant increases in work readiness, career planning and thinking positively about school. These positive changes are equal or better to other career interventions for young people and their shifts in knowledge, skills and attitudes suggest they will be more able to transition into appropriate destinations post-16.
    • Future frontiers: the impact of career coaching on year 11 students

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (IAEVG, 2020-03)
      This paper considers the issue of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) and in particular it describes an evaluation of a career coaching programme conducted in a disadvantaged school for teenage students in London, England. The long-term aim of the programme is to improve destinations for children and reduce the number of NEETs, but in the shorter term the evaluation employed a semi-quasi experimental design to identify whether the coaching produced changes in career readiness and indicators of successful transitions. The students who took part in the coaching programme showed significant increases in some aspects of career readiness and some indicators of successful transitions compared to young people who did not. The paper discusses the size of the effects found and the importance of establishing short term measures of impacts for programmes that ultimately wish to evidence long-term impacts such as reduced NEET numbers.
    • The Gatsby benchmarks and social mobility: impacts to date

      Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (IAEVG, 2020-03)
      Young people face a lengthening transition from education to the world of work. The average age that young people leave full-time education has been rising for over a century. Within the education system they are frequently asked to make choices about subject, institution and qualifications that will exert a profound influence on their future lives. This is an issue for all young people and is particularly concerning because social capital is a significant influence on careers. Some young people can lack the social capital to develop an awareness of careers and labour markets, decision making around careers and progression routes available to them through education and training. They can then be at risk of being outperformed by their more advantaged peers when building their careers. This paper discusses recent developments in policy and career strategy in England for young people and the extent to which career strategy is moving away from being a marginalised policy area. It examines a recent pilot which has operationalised elements of the recent career strategy for young people and an evaluation which explores how career guidance, as an all-inclusive measure, is being used to impact positively on learners in the short, medium and long term.
    • Gatsby careers benchmark north east implementation pilot: interim evaluation (2015-2017)

      Hanson, Jill; Vigurs, Katy; Moore, Nicki; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-02-15)
      This report presents interim evaluation findings on the implementation of the Gatsby Benchmarks (herewith referred to as the Benchmarks) for good career guidance with a sample of 16 pilot schools and colleges (herewith referred to as education providers) in the North East of England. These interim findings report progress made against the Benchmarks during the course of the pilot (autumn 2015 to autumn 2017), the enablers and barriers faced, and the impact of the Benchmarks on learners’ career readiness and attainment. The interim findings suggest the following: Timescale - Schools and colleges involved were able to make significant strides towards fully meeting most, if not all, Benchmarks within two years. To date Benchmark 2 (Learning from career and labour market information) and Benchmark 7 (Encounters with FE and HE) have seen the largest increase in the number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Benchmark 3 (Addressing the needs of every pupil) and Benchmark 4 (Linking curriculum to careers) have the least number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Positive impact on learners. Learners show an increase in some aspects of career readiness and tentative increases in some aspects of GCSE attainment. Effective implementation of the Benchmarks. This was enabled by the existence of a regional facilitator to support pilot education providers and strong provider leadership and robust organisational infrastructures. Key barriers were a lack of time and space (in the curriculum), a lack of funding and a lack of commitment at senior leadership level, which impacted on achieving a cultural shift in some education providers. Regional impact. The implementation of the Benchmarks is impacting more widely in the region with non-pilot education providers forming links with pilot providers to seek support on developing good career guidance in their settings. Furthermore, wider stakeholders such as local employers and providers of careers education were also using the Benchmarks to review and develop their services to schools/colleges. Emerging challenges: A noticeable challenge was how the term ‘meaningful’, in relation to encounters with employers and employees, was interpreted and how education providers monitor provision of such encounters.
    • Give yourself the edge: Evaluation report.

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-09-06)
    • International centre for guidance studies (iCeGS) annual review 2019

      Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; Hanson, Jill; Nicki, Moore; Tom, Staunton; International Centre for Guidance Studies (2019-12-01)
    • My future: Developing career education and guidance at school.

      Moore, Nicki; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-09-03)
      This report in conjunction with a new quality framework for delivering career guidance in schools, will be the foundation of a new web-based resource which will help teachers in schools across Europe to develop their provision in response to these issues. Throughout the report, the chapters are cross-referenced to the framework to allow a consistent read across and to inform the development of training and development programmes.
    • A new career in higher education careers work.

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-07-26)
      Neary and Hanson’s chapter reports on research conducted with the HE career development workforce and focusses on careers advisers who have moved into the field within the last five years. Their research illustrates a highly dedicated and satisfied workforce demonstrating a strong set of values. Predominantly, most have moved from other roles in education/higher education or HR and recruitment. They raise questions about the highly gendered nature of careers work which is dominated by women; as they suggest, unsurprisingly given how many caring jobs are still associated with a female workforce. Their chapter supports what Thambar reports in her chapter about the dedicated nature of careers advisers.
    • The personal guidance fund- developing new and innovative practice

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (The Career Development Institute, 2020-01)
      To support the implementation of Gatsby Benchmark 8, ‘Personal Guidance’, the Careers & Enterprise Company have invested £2.5 million over two phases, to showcase how groups of schools and colleges can successfully and affordably deliver personal guidance. In total, eighteen projects will be funded until July 2020. This article introduces these programmes and presents some of the initial findings from the evaluation of the Personal Guidance Fund being undertaken by the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby.
    • Supporting service children in school: An organisational improvement framework

      Burke, Ciaran; Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Parker, Gordon; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12)
      The SCiP Alliance defines a Service child as a person whose parent, or carer, serves in the regular Armed Forces, or as a reservist, or has done so at any point during the first 25 years of that person’s life. Quoting the 2016 School Census, McCulloch and Hall (2016) report that there are 68,771 Service children in England. Service family life may involve repeated relocation, deployment and separation; literature highlights the impact this lifestyle may have on Service children‘s progression. The empirical research detailed in this report provides a robust evidence base to support the development of an improvement framework, a simple way for schools to identify improvement priorities and strategies for their work supporting Service children.
    • Transition programmes for young adults with SEND. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Codina, Geraldene; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Careers and Enterprise Company, 2017-10)
      This paper describes the evidence base for transition programmes for young adults with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND). Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying the impacts from transition programming and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.