• Education, health and care plans: A qualitative investigation into service user experiences of the planning process.

      Adams, Lorna; Tindle, Angus; Basran, Sabrina; Dobie, Sarah; Thomson, Dominic; Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; University of Derby; IFF Research (Department for Education, 2018-01)
      An Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan sets out the education, health and care support that is to be provided to a child or young person aged 0-25 years who has Special Educational Needs or a Disability (SEND). It is drawn up by the local authority after an EHC needs assessment of the child or young person, in consultation with relevant partner agencies, parents and the child or young person themselves. EHC plans, and the needs assessment process through which they are created, were introduced as part of the Children and Families Act 2014. The Act, and an accompanying SEND Code of Practice, sets out how local authorities must deliver EHC plans. In 2016, a national survey commissioned by the Department for Education (DfE) found variations in how EHC plan recipients experienced the EHC planning process across different local authorities.1 Based on these results, DfE commissioned two further research projects: a multivariate analysis of factors affecting satisfaction with the EHC planning process, and this qualitative investigation of user experiences of the EHC planning process. The qualitative investigation consisted of two distinct exercises: • Twenty-five face-to-face in-depth interviews with parents involved in the 2016 survey, with the aim of better understanding factors that lead to satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the EHC plan process. Thirteen interviews were conducted in local authorities with above average satisfaction, and 12 were conducted in local authority areas with below average satisfaction. • An evaluation of EHC plan quality focussing on plans provided by 18 of the 25 parents interviewed. The evaluation was conducted by a panel of 10 SEND experts with wide experience as SEND policy advisors, strategic leaders in LAs, specialist advisory teachers, officers in SEN statutory services, Special Needs Co-ordinators, teachers in special and mainstream schools and lecturers. There was little evidence of a link between families’ satisfaction with the process of getting the EHC plan and experts’ evaluations of the quality of the plan: this report therefore discusses these two strands of research separately.
    • The Language of SEND: Implications for the SENCO

      Codina, Geraldene; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester (Routledge, 2021-04-22)
      The central tenet of this chapter is that language matters. Over the centuries as human beings have represented and categorised both themselves and others in different ways, so interpretations and the language of disability (physical and learning) shape-shifts altering through time (Goodey, 2016). The language of disability and the societal and political values which underpin it are therefore not cross-historical – let two or three generations pass and the labels associated with disability alter. Sometimes such changes in language usage can seem little more than semantic fashion or a professional challenge to keep up-to-date with. The language of disability is however more than fashion and political correctness (Mallett and Slater, 2014), for words gain their meaning from the manner in which they are used (Wittgenstein, 2009). This chapter argues the language of special education shapes SENCOs’ values, expectations, assumptions, responses and practice. Through an exploration of historical and current language usage, this chapter analyses the language of special education and the implications for the school community.
    • Resilience, Reflection and Reflexivity

      Codina, Geraldene; Fordham, Jon; University of Derby; Urban Primary School, UK (Bloomsbury, 2021-02-25)
      Historically the teacher resilience literature has tended to focus on the individual (Day, 2017), their ability to manage stressors and risk factors and to draw on protective factors (Howard and Johnson, 2004). More recently the emphasis has shifted from analysis of the individual, towards understandings which emphasise the interaction between individuals and their environments (Ungar, 2012). Focussed more on the latter rather than the former, this chapter moves away from the potentially damaging effects of a ‘pull yourself together’ mentality, in favour of analysis which contextualises teacher resilience. Teacher resilience is viewed more in terms of the space where an individual’s capacity to navigate challenges interacts over time with their personal and professional contexts (Beltman, 2015). The desired outcome of this meeting between individual and context is a teacher who experiences professional engagement and growth, commitment, enthusiasm, satisfaction, and wellbeing (Beltman, 2015) and thus is able to act in a personally, socially and emotionally responsible way. The nexus between professional challenge and teacher satisfaction is explored through two case studies presented in this chapter and the subsequent discussion which addresses the inclusion of children with additional needs (both special educational needs and/or disability (SEND) and able and talented).
    • SENCO induction pack: Supporting you at the start of your journey

      Whatton, Julie; Codina, Geraldene; Middleton, Tristan; Esposito, Rosanne; Department for Education; NASEN (Whole School SEND/DfE/LLSENDCiC/nasen, 2019-04)
      This induction pack has been designed by SENCOs for SENCOs as a useful reference tool that can be used from day one of undertaking this important role. It can be a valuable asset to both new and experienced professionals alike and we would recommend it to all SENCOs. We understand that the role is context-specific and so, instead of trying to prescribe a single approach, this induction pack sets out the key operational considerations so that SENCOs can make more informed decisions. This SENCO Induction Pack has been developed by Leading Learning for SEND Community Interest Company as part of a suite of resources developed by the Whole School SEND Consortium3, hosted by nasen4, to embed good SEND provision in schools. This project was funded by the Department for Education. As such, the induction pack includes references to a broad range of organisations, resources and documents from across the SEND community. This is in keeping with one of the wider principles of Whole School SEND, which is to maximise the use of existing resources to save schools time and money.
    • Transition programmes for young adults with SEND. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Codina, Geraldene; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (Careers and Enterprise Company, 2017-10)
      This paper describes the evidence base for transition programmes for young adults with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND). Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying the impacts from transition programming and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • Understanding inclusion

      Wharton, Julie; Codina, Geraldene; Middleton, Tristan; Esposito, Rosanne; University of Winchester; University of Derby; University of Gloucestershire; UCL Centre for Inclusive Education (Nasen, 2020-06-02)
      This mini guide is for SENCOs, school leaders (including governors), teachers and support staff. This guide aims to help you to consider your position with regard to inclusion in your setting, identify how you can develop an inclusive ethos and practice and reflect on the approach to inclusion taken in your setting.