• Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Executive summary

      Moore, Nicki; Clark, Lewis; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
      This is the executive summary which sets out the findings of European research undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
    • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Final report

      Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
      This report sets out the findings of an Erasmus funded pan-Euopean research project which investigated the impacts on young peoples career decisions. The research was undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
    • Evaluation of outreach interventions for under 16 year olds: Tools and guidance for higher education providers.

      Harrison, Neil; Vigurs, Katy; Crockford, Julian; McCaig Colin; Squire, Ruth; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (Office for Students (OfS), 2018-12-13)
      During 2017-18, OFFA commissioned research that aimed to understand the nature of outreach activities for under 16 year olds (which were funded through access and participation investment) and how these were evaluated. This document, developed from the research, is intended to act as a resource for pre-16 outreach practitioners and evaluators, drawing both on the data collected by this project and the wider literature around evaluation and outreach. It seeks to recognise the complexity of pre-16 outreach work and eschews a prescriptive approach in favour of establishing important principles and actions that are likely to underpin good practice. Our discussion is broadly positioned within a ‘social realist’ worldview (Archer, 2008; Pawson, 2013) that seeks to understand the fuzzy nature of the cause-and-effect relationships that exist within complex social fields, where individuals construct their own realities in reference to those around them. There is a particular focus on epistemology – the pathways to creating dependable, if contingent, knowledge – as a vehicle for making meaning from data that is usually incomplete, compromised or mediated through young people’s emergent constructions of their worlds. Fundamentally, outreach is predicated on the ability of practitioners to influence young people in a planned way, albeit that the plan will not always work for every young person in every cohort. An important element in this epistemology is that it is not concerned with finding single ‘solutions’ that exist outside time and context. Rather, it is concerned with understanding how young people are influenced by their life experiences – not ‘what works’, but what works in a given context and, importantly, why. It is only through understanding the latter element that practices can become robustly effective in the long-term and potentially transferable to other contexts. This is particularly appropriate to pre-16 outreach work due to the lengthy time lag between activity and application to higher education (HE).
    • An evaluation of the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire collaborative outreach programme

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-05)
      In the East Midlands the NCOP consortia is the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme (DANCOP) which is a progression of NEMCON (North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network) and is comprised from several universities and colleges of further education. DANCOP’s initial two goals were: 1. Raise learners’ motivation to work hard and their understanding of the importance of education in their future: 2. Equip learners to plan for progression and make appropriate choices for post-16 study and HE. This report includes an extensive review of literature on widening access, collaboration and networks and details a formative and summative evaluation undertaken by The International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) using data collected from February 2017 to May 2019. It reports on the progress made by DANCOP up until April 2019 with respect to: 1. The development of the collaborative network 2. The extent to which schools and learners have been engaged 3. The perceived impact of activities on learners, feedback from learners, teachers and parents and distance travelled with respect to knowledge/attitudes/intentions pertaining to future options and in particular higher education 4. Innovations in collaborative working and widening access The evaluation has captured data from surveys, interviews and focus groups from DANCOP team members, management group members, learners, teaching and school staff, session deliverers and third party providers. KEY FINDINGS 1. The network is well established amongst the HEIs, external stakeholders and FE colleges 2. DANCOP has surpassed its targets with respect to school engagement and learner interactions 3. It took a long time to establish the central and hub teams and recruit college based roles, partly because of the policies and processes inherent in HEIs and FECs but also because of non-competitive salaries and short term contracts. 4. It took a long time to build awareness in schools and develop good working relationships so that activities could be delivered. In short term funded programmes this is a problem. 5. DANCOP could work more quickly if legal, recruitment and financial issues and executive sign off could be facilitated. 6. Collaborative work has been supported by: a. Representation of key partners across different management groups b. The structural and physical location of teams and individuals c. An agile Steering Group and inclusion of further education colleges through the IPG d. ‘Blended Professionals’ who have significant experience, knowledge and skills and are able to cross boundaries to get work done 7. Key innovations have been the IPG, a small but agile steering group and using funding for longer term resources such as skills study coaches in colleges and the STEM Centre. 8. With respect to activities, feedback has been almost entirely positive, and this includes learners, teachers, DANCOP staff funded roles and parents. This has been the case across the wide range of different activities which have been delivered, across year groups and across delivery teams. 9. Activity evaluations show participants report significant increases in knowledge about HE and confidence. 10. Comparisons of knowledge, attitudes and intentions between DANCOP and non DANCOP learners suggest there have been the desired changes in DANCOP learners. They have shown increased likelihood of attending FE and HE, increased sense of academic fit, increased confidence and increased knowledge of HE.
    • An evaluation of the INSPiRED teenager framework

      Clark, Lewis; Parry, Caroline; University of Derby (National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2019-10-01)
      Teenagers frequently struggle to make informed career choices and often turn to their parents or carers for help. In response to this, the INSPiRED Teenager framework was developed to encourage collaborative career-based learning between parents and carers and their teenage child. A mixedmethods approach was implemented to explore the effectiveness of the two programme delivery formats. The findings show evidence of improving teenagers’ career confidence and career direction clarity and also parents/carers’ understanding of the changing world of work, their ability to have informed conversations with their teenagers, and their confidence and clarity to help their teenager make informed career decisions
    • Evaluation of the INSPiRED teenager programme

      Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-04-01)
      The INSPiRED Teenager programme is a variant of the existing INSPiRED framework (RE -INSPiRED Professional and INSPiRED Team programmes) that was successfully developed and tested in 2015. The framework provides an easy to learn self or facilitated coaching process by which participants can conduct regular career reviews throughout their working life. INSPiRED Teenager in particular is grounded in helping parents and carers to enable their teenagers to identify a purpose and combine this with their potential to improve career clarity and confidence in a radically changing labour market. While research suggests some 70% of teenagers turn to their parents for help, and that 56% of parents feel ill-equipped to help, the world of work is continuing to change due to technological developments. In response to this, the INSPiRED Teenager programme was developed as many young people are now need to adapt, pivot and continually learn new skills as new careers and training routes open up. The evaluation set out to assess the effectiveness of the two delivery formats, the effectiveness of the programme in helping to improve teenagers’ career confidence and clarity, and the effectiveness of the programme to support parents/carers to have informed conversations with their teenagers about their future careers.
    • An evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of good career guidance

      Hanson, Jill; Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; University of Debry (University of Derby, 2021-03-01)
      This report presents the findings of a four year (2016-2019) formative and summative evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of Good Career Guidance. It uses quantitative and qualitative data collected from school and college staff, learners and stakeholders, as well as Gatsby Benchmark self-audit data, financial data and data pertaining to learner attendance, attainment and destinations. It describes the progress made by the sixteen pilot education providers in achieving the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, explores the approaches they took to achieving the Benchmarks and considers the barriers and enablers they faced. The impacts of their work in delivering the Gatsby Benchmarks on learners, staff, local stakeholders and national policy and practice are presented. The findings indicate that significant progress in achieving all eight Benchmarks can be made by all kinds of education providers within two years and that this has a significant and observable effect on learners with respect to their career readiness, their interactions with teaching staff and employers, their engagement in the classroom and on attainment.
    • Future Frontiers: The impact of career coaching on career readiness and indicators of successful transitions in Year 11 pupils.

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (Future Frontiers, 2019-06-07)
      Taking part in the Future Frontiers programme has significant and positive effects on all aspects of student’s career readiness. In particular, pupils showed significant increases in work readiness, career planning and thinking positively about school. These positive changes are equal or better to other career interventions for young people and their shifts in knowledge, skills and attitudes suggest they will be more able to transition into appropriate destinations post-16.
    • Future frontiers: the impact of career coaching on year 11 students

      Hanson, Jill; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (IAEVG, 2020-03)
      This paper considers the issue of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) and in particular it describes an evaluation of a career coaching programme conducted in a disadvantaged school for teenage students in London, England. The long-term aim of the programme is to improve destinations for children and reduce the number of NEETs, but in the shorter term the evaluation employed a semi-quasi experimental design to identify whether the coaching produced changes in career readiness and indicators of successful transitions. The students who took part in the coaching programme showed significant increases in some aspects of career readiness and some indicators of successful transitions compared to young people who did not. The paper discusses the size of the effects found and the importance of establishing short term measures of impacts for programmes that ultimately wish to evidence long-term impacts such as reduced NEET numbers.
    • Gatsby careers benchmark north east implementation pilot: interim evaluation (2015-2017)

      Hanson, Jill; Vigurs, Katy; Moore, Nicki; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-02-15)
      This report presents interim evaluation findings on the implementation of the Gatsby Benchmarks (herewith referred to as the Benchmarks) for good career guidance with a sample of 16 pilot schools and colleges (herewith referred to as education providers) in the North East of England. These interim findings report progress made against the Benchmarks during the course of the pilot (autumn 2015 to autumn 2017), the enablers and barriers faced, and the impact of the Benchmarks on learners’ career readiness and attainment. The interim findings suggest the following: Timescale - Schools and colleges involved were able to make significant strides towards fully meeting most, if not all, Benchmarks within two years. To date Benchmark 2 (Learning from career and labour market information) and Benchmark 7 (Encounters with FE and HE) have seen the largest increase in the number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Benchmark 3 (Addressing the needs of every pupil) and Benchmark 4 (Linking curriculum to careers) have the least number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Positive impact on learners. Learners show an increase in some aspects of career readiness and tentative increases in some aspects of GCSE attainment. Effective implementation of the Benchmarks. This was enabled by the existence of a regional facilitator to support pilot education providers and strong provider leadership and robust organisational infrastructures. Key barriers were a lack of time and space (in the curriculum), a lack of funding and a lack of commitment at senior leadership level, which impacted on achieving a cultural shift in some education providers. Regional impact. The implementation of the Benchmarks is impacting more widely in the region with non-pilot education providers forming links with pilot providers to seek support on developing good career guidance in their settings. Furthermore, wider stakeholders such as local employers and providers of careers education were also using the Benchmarks to review and develop their services to schools/colleges. Emerging challenges: A noticeable challenge was how the term ‘meaningful’, in relation to encounters with employers and employees, was interpreted and how education providers monitor provision of such encounters.
    • International centre for guidance studies (iCeGS) annual review 2019

      Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; Hanson, Jill; Nicki, Moore; Tom, Staunton; International Centre for Guidance Studies (2019-12-01)
    • Personal guidance: What works?

      Everitt, Julia; Neary, Siobhan; Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2018-11-13)
    • A Practitioner's Guide to Uncharted Waters of Career Counselling, a Critical Reflection Perspective

      Košťálová, Helena; Cudlínová, Markéta; Blake, Hannah; Clark, Lewis; Dimsits, Miriam; Kavková, Eva; Graungaard, Elisabeth; Moore, Nicki; Sigaard Hansen, Jesper; Neary, Siobhan; et al. (EKS, 2021-05-01)
      This is a practical book intended for career practitioners working with young people in schools and other institutions providing career guidance and counselling. The aim is to offer practitioners support so that they can feel empowered in their roles as career counsellors, and are able to take care of themselves and gain new ideas for their practice. The book is one output of an Erasmus funded project which invovled partners from the UK, Denmark, Greece, Spain and the Czech Republic.
    • Progression for success: Evaluating North Yorkshire’s innovative careers guidance project

      Moore, Nicki; Vigurs, Katy; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (North Yorkshire County Council, 2017-11-14)
      This report sets out the findings from an evaluation of North Yorkshires innovative careers guidance project.
    • Supporting service children in school: An organisational improvement framework

      Burke, Ciaran; Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Parker, Gordon; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12)
      The SCiP Alliance defines a Service child as a person whose parent, or carer, serves in the regular Armed Forces, or as a reservist, or has done so at any point during the first 25 years of that person’s life. Quoting the 2016 School Census, McCulloch and Hall (2016) report that there are 68,771 Service children in England. Service family life may involve repeated relocation, deployment and separation; literature highlights the impact this lifestyle may have on Service children‘s progression. The empirical research detailed in this report provides a robust evidence base to support the development of an improvement framework, a simple way for schools to identify improvement priorities and strategies for their work supporting Service children.
    • Understanding parents’ contribution to young people’s career decision-making

      Clark, Lewis; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021-04-01)
      This article summarises Erasumus funded research to establish the impacts on young people's career decsion making. The article presents data pertaining to parental influence.
    • Understanding the evaluation of access and participation outreach interventions for under 16 year olds.

      Harrison, Neil; Vigurs, Katy; Crockford, Julian; McCaig Colin; Squire, Ruth; Clark, Lewis; University of the West of England; University of Derby; University of Sheffield; Sheffield Hallam University (Office for Students, 2018-12-13)
      The project team was asked to address the following six research questions and these were used to guide the project: 1. What are the intended outcomes for current outreach interventions directed at under 16 year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds where the long-term aim is to widen access to higher education (HE)? 2. What types of outreach intervention activity or activities are institutions using in relation to intended outcomes? 3. What evaluation tools, methods and metrics are being used to measure the intended outcomes? 4. What are the perceived and actual challenges and barriers for different stakeholders to effective evaluation of long-term outreach? 5. What do different stakeholders consider most effective evaluation practice and why? 6. How valid and suitable are the evaluation tools, methods and metrics (identified through the research) that are commonly used? The project was constructed around six interlinked work packages: 1. A quantitative analysis of what higher education providers (HEPs) say about their pre-16 outreach activities (and their evaluation) in their 2017-18 access agreements (as the most recent available). 2. An online survey of HEPs to gather information about the pre-16 outreach activities delivered during the 2016-17 academic year and their evaluation, as well as the structure of their evaluation resources and challenges faced. 3. Case studies of four HEPs identified as demonstrating elements of good practice through their access agreements and the online survey, derived from telephone interviews with key staff and documentary analysis. 4. Telephone interviews with 11 third sector organisations (TSOs) to explore their practices and the evaluation of their activities, providing a counterpoint to the data collected from higher education institutions (HEIs). 5. A synthesis of the four preceding work packages to explore elements of good practice, determine a basis for assessing the quality of evaluations and highlight challenges for the sector and OFFA. 6. An invited participatory workshop for evaluators from HEPs and TSOs identified as demonstrating elements of good practice through the online survey and telephone interviews, to act as a sounding board for the emerging conclusions and recommendations.