We are the hub for educational research at the University of Derby. The Centre conducts educational research and provides consultancy to schools, education providers, the wider education sector, and Government. We have a lifelong focus and addresses education policy, practice, and research from early years to adult learning. The Centre is home to researchers from the Institute of Education, educational researchers from across the University of Derby, and associate researchers from a range of schools and organisations. Its core areas of focus include career education and guidance; educational leadership and management; higher education; mathematics education; and special needs education. The Centre was launched in October 2015 and brings together a wide range of pre-existing research and expertise from the University of Derby.

Recent Submissions

  • Theorising career guidance policymaking: watching the sausage get made

    Hooley, Tristram; Godden, Lorraine; University of Derby; Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada (Informa UK Limited, 2021-07-14)
    In this article, we propose a framework for understanding career guidance policy. We use a systems theory approach informed by Gramscian theories of politics and power to make sense of this complexity. Firstly, we argue that career guidance policy is made by and for people and that there is a need to recognise all of the political and civil society actors involved. Secondly, we argue that policymaking comprises a series of ideological, technical and practical processes. Finally, we contend that policymaking takes place in a complex, multi-level environment which is can be described across three levels as the policy framing, middle and street level tiers.
  • Ethics, Impartiality, Locus of Control

    Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (EKS, 2021-05-01)
    Those working in ‘helping’ professions will occasionally be presented with issues that feel uncomfortable, challenge their own values and beliefs, and result in ethical dilemmas associated with choosing appropriate attitudes, behaviours and approaches. In the career development context, ethics refers to the moral principles that govern the way practitioners practice. This article provides a dialogue between two practitioners, who, discuss an ethical dilemma and try to decide on an appropriate course of action.
  • Personal Guidance Fund Evaluation: Final Report

    Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2021-07-07)
    Since the transfer of responsibility for career guidance to schools /colleges, a range of approaches to delivering personal guidance have been utilised in schools and colleges in order for them to meet the statutory requirement of implementation of the Gatsby benchmarks. In their report for The Careers & Enterprise Company, Everitt, Neary, Delgardo and Clark (2018) concluded that five key points need to be in place for effective personal guidance (space & time; preparation & feedback, effective interviewing; professionalism and integration) but that ‘the evidence on personal guidance remains a work in progress’. The Careers & Enterprise Company recognised the importance of this of this work, developing the Personal Guidance Fund which aimed to support the development of innovative, cost-effective models for delivering personal careers guidance in schools and colleges. Evaluation aims and objectives The evaluation focused on identifying effective approaches with the intention of improving practice beyond the fund. The report considers: 1. The effectiveness of different approaches. 2. Working with different beneficiary groups. 3. The impact of personal guidance on students. 4. The impact of training on staff and school/college career guidance. 5. Key learning regarding scaling up, sustainability and best practice This report describes the methodology adopted to answer these objectives and outlines key learning with regard to the different approaches adopted and the different beneficiaries targeted. It considers the impact of the programmes on students and the staff who took part in training and provides recommendations for programme providers, Careers Leaders and Senior Leadership Teams in schools and colleges.
  • A Practitioner's Guide to Uncharted Waters of Career Counselling, a Critical Reflection Perspective

    Košťálová, Helena; Cudlínová, Markéta; Blake, Hannah; Clark, Lewis; Dimsits, Miriam; Kavková, Eva; Graungaard, Elisabeth; Moore, Nicki; Sigaard Hansen, Jesper; Neary, Siobhan; et al. (EKS, 2021-05-01)
    This is a practical book intended for career practitioners working with young people in schools and other institutions providing career guidance and counselling. The aim is to offer practitioners support so that they can feel empowered in their roles as career counsellors, and are able to take care of themselves and gain new ideas for their practice. The book is one output of an Erasmus funded project which invovled partners from the UK, Denmark, Greece, Spain and the Czech Republic.
  • Increasing students’ career readiness through career guidance: measuring the impact with a validated measure

    Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-15)
    Career readiness is an important short-term outcome of career guidance activities in England. This research (1) details the development of a career readiness measure and (2) tests the relationship between career guidance interventions and career readiness among secondary school students. The measure was piloted on pupils (Study 1, N = 1508) in England taking part in a career guidance pilot programme. The instrument fitted a nine-item one-factor structure. In Study 2 (N = 2240), we found further evidence the factor structure was a good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 5242), we tested the relationship between career guidance activities and career readiness. Greater participation in career guidance activities was significantly associated with increased career readiness. These findings have implications for policymakers and researchers.
  • Decommissioning normal: COVID‐19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

    Beaton, Mhairi C.; Codina, Geraldene N.; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester; Leeds Beckett University (Wiley, 2021-06-02)
    To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Taking a hermeneutic stance, this paper draws on Gadamer's construction of the nature of new experiences. Focussed on the experience of social inclusion during the COVID-19 pandemic, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six key stakeholders. As the phenomenon in question was new, an inductive approach to thematic analysis was applied. The critical tenet of this paper is that the Erfahrung of COVID-19 has created the conditions for a “new normal” which have afforded children with learning disabilities altered opportunities for social inclusion, whether that be through increased power/agency for them and their families and/or new modes of connectedness leading to enhanced relationships. Whilst the impact of COVID-19 has been a negative one for many aspects of society, application of Simplican and Gadamer's theories on social inclusion and the nature of new experiences has permitted the surfacing of new possibilities for the social inclusion of children with learning disabilities.
  • Personal agency and organisational attachment: A career capital perspective

    Brown, Cathy; Hooley, Tristram; Wond, Tracey; Evolve Consulting Services Limited, Nottingham; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-14)
    Despite role transitions occurring frequently within organisations, career theories have often overlooked such transitions. Here we explore the role of personal agency and organisational attachment in shaping career capital enactment within intra-organisational role transitions. We propose a new career capital usage typology. Using an interpretivist approach, the research is based within a UK construction business and explores the role transition experiences of 36 business leaders. Through an analysis of workers’ career capital use we identify a new typology and groups workers as follows: Passive Worker, Company Worker, Political Worker and Career Worker. We argue that type varies in accordance with levels of personal agency and organisational attachment and that this variation in type is particularly important during intra-organisational role transitions.
  • Approaches to quality assurance in school-based career development: policymaker perspectives from Australia

    Rice, Suzanne; Hooley, Tristram; Crebbin, Sue; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-05-19)
    In this article we explore Australian policymaker perspectives on the quality assurance of career development (CD) programmes in schools. We found that Australian policymakers are concerned about the quality of CD provision in schools and have a wide range of approaches that they deploy to ensure and assure quality at the school level. Quality assurance within the country is focused on the qualifications and professionalism of the people delivering career development programmes rather than on systemic or organisational quality. We also found that the range of quality assurance tools that are deployed by such policymakers varies across the different Australian jurisdictions and is influenced by geography, the size of the jurisdiction and the level of priority given to career guidance.
  • Resilience, Reflection and Reflexivity

    Codina, Geraldene; Fordham, Jon; University of Derby; Urban Primary School, UK (Bloomsbury, 2021-02-25)
    Historically the teacher resilience literature has tended to focus on the individual (Day, 2017), their ability to manage stressors and risk factors and to draw on protective factors (Howard and Johnson, 2004). More recently the emphasis has shifted from analysis of the individual, towards understandings which emphasise the interaction between individuals and their environments (Ungar, 2012). Focussed more on the latter rather than the former, this chapter moves away from the potentially damaging effects of a ‘pull yourself together’ mentality, in favour of analysis which contextualises teacher resilience. Teacher resilience is viewed more in terms of the space where an individual’s capacity to navigate challenges interacts over time with their personal and professional contexts (Beltman, 2015). The desired outcome of this meeting between individual and context is a teacher who experiences professional engagement and growth, commitment, enthusiasm, satisfaction, and wellbeing (Beltman, 2015) and thus is able to act in a personally, socially and emotionally responsible way. The nexus between professional challenge and teacher satisfaction is explored through two case studies presented in this chapter and the subsequent discussion which addresses the inclusion of children with additional needs (both special educational needs and/or disability (SEND) and able and talented).
  • Career education: every teacher has a role

    Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Education Services Australia, 2021)
    This paper provides an overview of the role that teachers can play in career education.
  • Understanding parents’ contribution to young people’s career decision-making

    Clark, Lewis; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021-04-01)
    This article summarises Erasumus funded research to establish the impacts on young people's career decsion making. The article presents data pertaining to parental influence.
  • Training careers professionals: Underpinning research for the C-Course programme.

    Hooley, Tristram; Schulstok, Torild; University of Derby; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2021)
    This report sets out the findings of research conducted in the Czech Republic, Norway, Slovakia and Poland to underpin the development of a new professional e-learning programme for careers practitioners. The recommendations are based on a review of the literature, desk research in each of the countries, expert interviews and practitioner focus groups. Overall, the research finds that: 1. there is a clear demand for an e-learning course for careers practitioners across the four countries. The e-learning should: 2. be clearly articulated in a way that clarifies who should engage with it and why; 3. be flexible to ensure that a wide range of practitioners can access and benefit from it; 4. include interaction with others and foster a community of practice; and 5. make use of a range of technologies by using multi-media and interactive tools. In terms of content, the training should include: 6. clarification of the key terminology and definitions with the field; 7. an overview different approaches to delivering careers services; 8. how to work with a range of different sectors and different client groups; 9. how to work more systemically e.g. with families, communities and organisations; 10. knowledge about the education system, labour market and the research skills required to gather this information for yourself; 11. support for those who are undergoing the training to become professionals and adopt healthy, ethical, reflective, and context-aware practice; and 12. an overview of key theories and evidence for more advanced practitioners.
  • Career Development Framework: Using the Framework to support career education and guidance in secondary schools (Key stage 3 - post-16)

    Hooley, Tristram; Career Development Institute (Career Development Institute, 2021)
    This document introduces the CDI’s Career Development Framework for secondary schools. It clarifies the skills, knowledge and attitudes that individuals need to have a positive career and explores how secondary schools can support pupils to build their career development skills. A ‘positive career’ will mean something different to different people, but it will typically include being happy with the way you spend your time, being able to make a contribution to your community and being able to have a decent standard of living.
  • Career Development Framework

    Hooley, Tristram; Career Development Institute (Career Development Institute, 2021)
    This document introduces the CDI’s Career Development Framework to careers professionals, educators and other professionals who work supporting people to develop their careers. Its main purpose is to clarify the skills, knowledge and attitudes that individuals need to have a positive career and to provide a framework for planning support for career development.
  • Redeveloping the CDI framework

    Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021)
    This paper describes a project that took place in 2020 to redevelop the CDI’s Careers, Employability and Enterprise Framework. The aim of the project was to update the existing framework by drawing in insights from key stakeholders and users of the framework. In addition, it was hoped to broaden out the relevance of the current CDI framework beyond its basis in secondary education to create a lifelong, all-age career management/ development skills framework
  • The Language of SEND: Implications for the SENCO

    Codina, Geraldene; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester (Routledge, 2021-04-22)
    The central tenet of this chapter is that language matters. Over the centuries as human beings have represented and categorised both themselves and others in different ways, so interpretations and the language of disability (physical and learning) shape-shifts altering through time (Goodey, 2016). The language of disability and the societal and political values which underpin it are therefore not cross-historical – let two or three generations pass and the labels associated with disability alter. Sometimes such changes in language usage can seem little more than semantic fashion or a professional challenge to keep up-to-date with. The language of disability is however more than fashion and political correctness (Mallett and Slater, 2014), for words gain their meaning from the manner in which they are used (Wittgenstein, 2009). This chapter argues the language of special education shapes SENCOs’ values, expectations, assumptions, responses and practice. Through an exploration of historical and current language usage, this chapter analyses the language of special education and the implications for the school community.
  • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Executive summary

    Moore, Nicki; Clark, Lewis; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
    This is the executive summary which sets out the findings of European research undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
  • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Final report

    Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
    This report sets out the findings of an Erasmus funded pan-Euopean research project which investigated the impacts on young peoples career decisions. The research was undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
  • Exploring critical perspectives on labour market information through the lens of elite graduate recruitment

    Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-03-04)
    This article provides a critical discourse analysis of how career is discussed on elite graduate recruitment websites. Building on previous work from Handley (2018) and Ingram and Allen (2019) this article draws attention to how career is constructed, first, as something which graduates consume and, second, as a ‘liminal experience’ which transforms the graduates' identities and allows them to gain access to a new authentic self, now able to progress towards their personal goals. This ideological reading of careers information is different to traditional understandings of careers information in Higher Education research which focuses on the objective nature of information which can be used to support the rational decision making. Focussing on the ideology of career draws attention to the need for careers delivery, in Higher Education and beyond, to engage with more critical pedagogical approaches.
  • Labour market information and social justice: a critical examination

    Staunton, Tom; Rogosic, Karla; University of Derby (Springer, 2021-03-04)
    Labour Market Information forms a central place in career practice and how individuals enact their careers. This paper makes use of Alvesson and Sandberg’s (Constructing research questions: doing interesting research. Sage, Thousand Oaks, 2013) methodology of focussing research on theoretical assumptions to construct a critical literature review on the relationship between Labour Market Information and career guidance. This paper presents six theoretical conceptions from the career literature: Contact, Rationalism, Nomad, Adaptability, Constructivist and Social Justice. We will argue for the need to move towards more constructivist understandings of Labour Market Information as well understandings linked to more critical understandings of the labour market.

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