• The HADRIAN approach to accessible transport.

      Marshall, Russell; Porter, J. Mark; Sims, Ruth; Summerskill, Steve; Gyi, Diane E.; Case, Keith; Loughborough University (IOS Press, 2009)
      This paper describes research carried out at Loughborough University in the UK into the areas of 'design for all' and accessible transport. The research addresses two common needs for designers and ergonomists working towards developing more inclusive products and environments, namely data on users that is accessible, valid, and applicable and a means of utilising the data to assess the accessibility of designs during the early stages of development. HADRIAN is a computer-based inclusive design tool that has been developed to support designers in their efforts to develop products that meet the needs of a broader range of users. Currently HADRIAN is being expanded to support transport design. This includes data on an individual's ability to undertake a variety of transport-related tasks, such as vehicle ingress/egress, coping with uneven surfaces, steps, street furniture and complex pedestrian environments. The subsequent use of this data will be supported either through a task analysis system that will allow a designer to evaluate a design for a part of the transport infrastructure (ticket barrier, train carriage etc.), or alternatively allow the designer or an end user to evaluate a whole journey. The 'journey planner' feature of the HADRIAN tool will compare an individual's physical, cognitive and emotional abilities with the demands placed upon that individual by the mode(s) of transport available and the route options selected. It is envisaged that these developments will prove extremely useful to users, designers, planners and all those involved with transport use and implementation.
    • HADRIAN meets AUNT-SUE

      Marshall, Russell; Porter, J. Mark; Sims, Ruth; Gyi, Diane E.; Case, Keith; Loughborough University (2005)
      HADRIAN is a computer aided design tool, developed to support designers in their efforts to ‘design for all’. Combining a database of individuals together with a task analysis tool HADRIAN provides a virtual group of 100 people, ready to perform a user trial at any point throughout a product’s design. Developed initially to predict design inclusion for localised design problems such as those experienced in a kitchen environment, HADRIAN is now being developed to include transport data as part of the AUNT-SUE project. AUNT-SUE is a transport related project that is funded as part of the EPSRC’s Sustainable Urban Environment programme. The project addresses policy making through to design and implementation in its aims to support effective socially inclusive design and operation of transport systems. Part of the AUNT-SUE project addresses exclusion faced by people whilst making a typical journey including: the inability to access adequate route-finding and timetabling information, problems accessing transport infrastructure (bus/tram stops, cycle routes, railway stations etc.), getting on and off transport, and managing interchanges between different transport types. This paper discusses the development of the relationship between HADRIAN and AUNTSUE. Initial work focuses on additional data for the database covering transport related tasks. Later work will focus on improving the task analysis capability of HADRIAN whilst integrating the transport related functionality. Ultimately the project also provides the opportunity to further develop HADRIAN towards the needs of designers developing products that maximise social inclusion.
    • HADRIAN: a human modelling CAD tool to promote "design for all"

      Porter, J. Mark; Marshall, Russell; Sims, Ruth; Gyi, Diane E.; Case, Keith; Loughborough University (2003)
      The arguments for a Design for All or Inclusive Design approach to product, environment or service design are clear and well understood. In order to address the underlying issues it is vitally important that designers are educated, informed and supported in the principles of Design for All, with appropriate and applicable data, and with the tools and techniques to employ this data in their design activity. This paper introduces our approach to supporting the designer in a Design for All philosophy. The main focus of this approach is our computer aided design and analysis tool HADRIAN. HADRIAN provides our sample database of 100 individuals across a broad spectrum of ages and abilities together with a task analysis tool. Working in combination with the existing human modelling system SAMMIE the system allows the designer to assess their designs against the population in the database to determine the percentage who are effectively ‘designed out’. The system has been developed to build empathy with the target population. In addition, the system provides a relatively simple, yet powerful, method of obtaining a form of user feedback and insight normally only attainable through expensive prototypes mock-ups and user trials. This feedback is also provided at a much earlier stage of the design process. HADRIAN is the result of a three year EPSRC funded project that was part of the EQUAL initiative. This project concluded in October 2002 but the development of HADRIAN is ongoing.
    • HADRIAN: a virtual approach to design for all.

      Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Porter, J. Mark; Summerskill, Steve; Gyi, Diane E.; Davis, Peter; Sims, Ruth; Loughborough University (Taylor and Francis, 2010)
      This article describes research into the area of ‘design for all’. The research addresses two common needs for designers working towards developing inclusive products and environments, namely, data on users that are accessible, valid and applicable, and a means of utilising the data to assess the accessibility of designs during the early stages of development. The approach taken is through the development of a combined database and inclusive human modelling tool called HADRIAN. Data were collected on 100 people, the majority of whom are older or have some form of impairment. These individuals provide a browsable resource spanning size, shape, capability, preferences, and experiences with a range of daily activities and transport-related tasks. This is partnered with the development of a simple, CAD-based task analysis system. Tasks are carried out by the virtual individuals in the database and accessibility issues are reported, allowing excluded people to be investigated in order to understand the problems experienced and solutions identified. HADRIAN is also being expanded to include a more accessible journey planner that provides accessibility information to both end users and transport professionals. Together, HADRIAN allows more informed choices to be made either in travelling, or in the designing of products and environments.
    • HADRIAN: “I am not a number, I am a free man!”

      Porter, J. Mark; Marshall, Russell; Sims, Ruth; Case, Keith; Gyi, Diane E.; Loughborough University (Chalmers University, 2006)
      HADRIAN was created to make a step-function change in the way that inclusive design is accepted and integrated within design practice. Tables of percentile data have now been replaced by holistic databases of individuals covering a wide range of sizes and abilities. Whilst the initial research focussed on physical and behavioural issues related to anthropometry and biomechanics, our current data collection also includes simple emotional and cognitive data within the tool. Details of HADRIAN are presented, including our ‘journey planner’ that is being developed that will compare an individual’s physical, cognitive and emotional abilities with the demands that will be placed upon that individual during the envisioned journey. If the journey is unachievable or very difficult, then that person is likely to feel socially excluded. It is intended that the planner will identify a suitable alternative route and/or choice of transport mode. Designers will also be able to use the planner to assess inclusive design issues for existing and new facilities.
    • Haemophilia

      Elander, James; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2019-05)
      Haemophilia A and haemophilia B are inherited bleeding disorders caused by deficiencies in blood clotting factor proteins. This chapter gives an overview of evidence about psychological aspects of haemophilia, including inheritance, adherence to treatment, quality of life, and pain management.
    • Health, fitness, and responses to military training of officer cadets in a Gulf Cooperation Council country.

      Blacker, Sam D.; Horner, Fleur E.; Brown, Peter I.; Linnane, Denise M.; Wilkinson, David M.; Wright, Antony; Bluck, Les J.; Rayson, Mark P.; Optimal Performance Limited (2011-12)
      To quantify the health, fitness, and physiological responses to military training of Officer Cadets from a Gulf Cooperation Council country.
    • Home to us all: how connecting with nature helps us care for ourselves and the Earth.

      Charles, Cheryl; Keenleyside, Karen; Chapple, Rosalie; Kilburn, Bill; Salah van der Leest, Pascale; Allen, Diana; Richardson, Miles; Giusti, Matteo; Franklin, Lawrence; Harbrow, Michael; et al. (Children & Nature Network, 2018-11-22)
    • How one experiences and embodies compassionate mind training influences its effectiveness.

      Matos, Marcela; Duarte, Joana; Duarte, Cristiana; Gilbert, Paul; Pinto-Gouveia, José; University of Coimbra; University of Derby (Springer, 2017-12-02)
      This paper explores indicators of practice quality of a brief compassion mind training (CMT) intervention and their impact on the development of an inner sense of one’s compassionate self (CS) and a range of self-report measures. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: compassionate mind training (CMT; n = 77) and wait-list control. Participants in the CMT condition practiced a range of CMT practices during 2 weeks. Each week, participants completed a feedback questionnaire, measuring practice frequency, helpfulness and embodiment of the practices in everyday life. Self-report measures of compassion, positive affect, shame, self-criticism, fears of compassion and psychopathological symptoms were also completed at pre and post. Practice frequency was associated with the frequency and easiness of embodiment of the CS. Perceived helpfulness of the practices was related to greater embodiment of the CS and to increases in compassion, reassured self, relaxed and safe affect and decreases in self-criticism. The embodiment variables of the CS were associated with higher compassion for the self, for others and from others and with improvements in reassured self, safe affect and compassionate goals. Embodiment of the CS and perceived helpfulness of the practices predicted compassion for the self and experience of compassion from others at post-intervention. Perceiving compassion cultivation practices as helpful and being able to embody the CS in everyday life is key to foster self-compassion and the experience of receiving compassion from others, as well as to promote feelings of safeness, contentment and calmness.
    • Human nature and suffering.

      Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08-10)
      Human Nature and Suffering is a profound comment on the human condition, from the perspective of evolutionary psychology. Paul Gilbert explores the implications of humans as evolved social animals, suggesting that evolution has given rise to a varied set of social competencies, which form the basis of our personal knowledge and understanding. Gilbert shows how our primitive competencies become modified by experience - both satisfactorily and unsatisfactorily. He highlights how cultural factors may modify and activate many of these primitive competencies, leading to pathology proneness and behaviours that are collectively survival threatening. These varied themes are brought together to indicate how the social construction of self arises from the organization of knowledge encoded within the competencies. This Classic Edition features a new introduction from the author, bringing Gilbert's early work to a new audience. The book will be of interest to clinicians, researchers and historians in the field of psychology.
    • “I think I’ll just go and eat worms”: the effect of bullying on self-esteem,. Body image, and eating disordered behaviour

      Blake, C. E.; Haynes, Caroline Anne; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 1999)
      The link between low self-esteem and eating disorders; and body image and eating disorders, has been well established. In addition, Button, Sonuga-Barke, Davies and Thompson, (1996) suggested that problems at school may also contribute to the development of eating disorders. In the present study the effects of bully on self-esteem , body image and eating disordered behaviour were investigate in a cohort of fifty eight college students aged between sixteen and twenty. Participants completed questionnaire measures of social and global self-esteem, body image distortion, bullying and prevalence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Analysis revealed a significant effect for bullying on self-esteem and body image when controlling for gender, and on eating disordered behaviour in females but not in males (P<.01). Individuals who were bulletined had significantly lower self-esteem and significantly higher body image distortion and eating disordered scores than individual who were not bullied. The study highlights the importance of bullying as a possible aetiological factor in the developing of eating disordered behaviour.
    • "I'm 100% for it! I'm a convert!": Women's experiences of a yoga programme during treatment for gynaecological cancer; an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

      Archer, Stephanie; Phillips, Elly; Montague, Jane; Bali, Anish; Sowter, Heidi M.; University of Derby; Royal Derby Hospital, Derby (Elsevier, 2015-02)
      To explore patients' experiences of taking part in a yoga intervention while undergoing treatment for gynaecological cancer.
    • 'I'm not X, I just want Y': formulating 'wants' in interaction

      Childs, Carrie; Loughborough University (2012-04-30)
      This article provides a conversation analytic description of a two-part structure, ‘I don’t want X, I want/just want Y’. Drawing on a corpus of recordings of family mealtimes and television documentary data, I show how speakers use the structure in two recurrent environments. First, speakers may use the structure to reject a proposal regarding their actions made by an interlocutor. Second, speakers may deliver the structure following a co-interactant’s formulation of their actions or motivations. Both uses decrease the likelihood of challenge in third-turn position. When responding to multi-unit turns speakers routinely deal with the last item first. The value of ‘I want Y’ is to formulate an alternative sense of agency which undermines the preceding turn and shifts the trajectory of the ongoing sequence. The article contributes to work in discursive psychology as I show how speakers may formulate their ‘wants’ in the service of sequentially unfolding social interaction.
    • Identification and characterisation of NANOG+/ OCT-4<sup>high</sup>/SOX2+ doxorubicin-resistant stem-like cells from transformed trophoblastic cell lines

      Balahmar, Reham M.; Boocock, David J.; Coveney, Clare; Ray, Sankalita; Vadakekolathu, Jayakumar; Regad, Tarik; Ali, Selman; Sivasubramaniam, Shiva; Nottingham Trent University (Impact Journals, 2018-01-11)
      Treatment of gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTD) involves surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Although, these therapeutic approaches are highly successful, drug resistance and toxicity remain a concern for high risk patients. This Chemoresistance has also been observed in the presence of cancer stem cells that are thought to be responsible for cases of cancer recurrence. In this study, we report the presence of previously unknown populations of trophoblastic stem-like cells (SLCs) that are resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. We demonstrate that these populations express the stem cell markers NANOG and Sox2 and higher levels of OCT-4 (NANOG+/OCT-4high/SOX2+). Although chemoresistant, we show that the invasive capacity of these trophoblastic SLCs is significantly inhibited by doxorubicin treatment. To better characterise these populations, we also identified cellular pathways that are involved in SLCs-chemoresistance to doxorubicin. In summary, we provide evidence of the presence of NANOG+/OCT-4+/SOX2+ trophoblastic SLCs that are capable to contribute to the susceptibility to GTD and that may be involved in Chemoresistance associated with drug resistance and recurrence in high risk GTDs’ patients. We propose that targeting these populations could be therapeutically exploited for clinical benefit.
    • Identification of angry faces in the attentional blink

      Maratos, Frances A.; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P. (2008)
    • Identification of novel candidate biomarkers of epithelial ovarian cancer by profiling the Secretomes of three-dimensional genetic models of ovarian carcinogenesis.

      Lawrenson, Kate; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Worthington, Jenny; Spindler, Tassja J.; O'Brien, Darragh; Lee, Janet M.; Spain, Georgia; Sharifian, Maryam; Wang, Guisong; Darcy, Kathleen M.; et al. (Wiley, 2014-09-09)
      Epithelial ovarian cancer is still considered the most lethal gynecological malignancy and improved early detection of ovarian cancer is crucial to improving patient prognoses. To address this need, we tested whether candidate EOC biomarkers can be identified using three-dimensional in vitro models. We quantified changes in the abundance of secreted proteins in a 3D genetic model of early-stage EOC, generated by expressing CMYC and KRAS(G12V) in TERT-immortalized normal ovarian epithelial cells. Cellular proteins were labeled in live cells using stable isotopic amino acid analogues, and secreted proteins identified and quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 37 and 55 proteins were differentially expressed by CMYC and CMYC+KRAS(G12V) expressing cells respectively (P<0.05; >2-fold). We evaluated expression of the top candidate biomarkers in ˜210 primary EOCs: CHI3L1 and FKBP4 are both expressed by >96% of primary EOCs, and FASN and API5 are expressed by 86% and 75% of cases. High expression of CHI3L1 and FKBP4 was associated with worse patient survival (P=0.042 and P=0.002 respectively). Expression of LGALS3BP was positively associated with recurrence (P=0.0001) and suboptimal debulking (P=0.018) suggesting that these proteins may be novel prognostic biomarkers. Furthermore, within early stage tumours (I/II), high expression of API5, CHI3L1 and FASN was associated with high tumour grade (P=3x10(-4) , P=0.016, P=0.010, respectively). We show in vitro cell biology models of early-stage cancer development can be used to identify novel candidate biomarkers for disease, and report the identification of proteins that represent novel potential candidate diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for this highly lethal disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    • Identifying the task characteristics that predict children's construction task performance

      Richardson, Miles; Jones, Gary; Croker, Steve; Brown, Stephen L. (2011)
      Construction tasks can be linked to achievement in maths and science and form part of school curricula. However, there is little foundation for their use in teaching as there are no apparent methods for assessing difficulty. This empirical research identifies four construction task characteristics that impact on cognition and influence construction task difficulty in children aged 7-8 and 10-11. Further a regression model from previous research with adults predicted children’s construction task performance in the present study. The research provides a method to quantify, predict and control the complexity of construction tasks for future research and to inform teaching.
    • Identifying the task variables that influence perceived object assembly complexity

      Richardson, Miles; Jones, Gary; Torrance, Mark; University of Derby; Staffordshire University (Taylor and Francis, 2004)
    • Identifying the task variables that predict object assembly difficulty.

      Richardson, Miles; Jones, Gary; Torrance, Mark; University of Derby (2006)
      We investigated the physical attributes of an object that influence the difficulty of its assembly. Identifying attributes that contribute to assembly difficulty will provide a method for predicting assembly complexity.
    • The impact of a school-based gardening intervention on intentions and behaviour related to fruit and vegetable consumption in children

      Duncan, Michael J.; Eyre, Emma; Bryant, Elizabeth; Clarke, Neil; Birch, Samantha; Staples, Vicki; Sheffield, David; University of Derby; Coventry University (Sage Publications, 2015-06-01)
      A total of 77 children (34 boys, 43 girls, mean age ± standard deviation = 9 ± 1 years) participated in this study; 46 children (intervention) undertook a 12-week school gardening programme and 31 children acted as controls. Measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and fruit and vegetable consumption were taken pre- and post-intervention. Repeated measures analysis of variance and hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the intervention group increased daily consumption of fruits and vegetables and increased intentions, attitudes, norms, and perceived behavioural control related to fruit and vegetable consumption. Attitudes, norms and perceived behavioural control significantly predicted changes in fruit and vegetable consumption.