• The effect of warm-up on high-intensity, intermittent running using nonmotorized treadmill ergometry.

      Brown, Peter I.; Hughes, Michael G.; Tong, Richard J.; University of Derby, Department of Sport and Exercise (2008-05)
      The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of previous warming on high-intensity intermittent running using nonmotorized treadmill ergometry. Ten male soccer players completed a repeated sprint test (10 x 6-second sprints with 34-second recovery) on a nonmotorized treadmill preceded by an active warm-up (10 minutes of running: 70% VO2max; mean core temperature (Tc) 37.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C), a passive warm-up (hot water submersion: 40.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C until Tc reached that of the active warm-up; 10 minutes +/- 23 seconds), or no warm-up (control). All warm-up conditions were followed by a 10-minute static recovery period with no stretching permitted. After the 10-minute rest period, Tc was higher before exercise in the passive trial (38.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C) compared to the active (37.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C) and control trials (37.2 +/- 0.2 degrees C; p < 0.05). There were no differences in pre-exercise oxygen consumption and blood lactate concentration; however, heart rate was greater in the active trial (p < 0.05). The peak mean 1-second maximum speed (MxSP) and group mean MxSP were not different in the active and passive trials (7.28 +/- 0.12 and 7.16 +/- 0.10 m x s(-1), respectively, and 7.07 +/- 0.33 and 7.02 +/- 0.24 m x s(-1), respectively; p > 0.05), although both were greater than the control. The percentage of decrement in performance fatigue was similar between all conditions (active, 3.4 +/- 1.3%; passive, 4.0 +/- 2.0%; and control, 3.7 +/- 2.4%). We conclude that there is no difference in high-intensity intermittent running performance when preceded by an active or passive warm-up when matched for post-warm-up Tc. However, repeated sprinting ability is significantly improved after both active and passive warm-ups compared to no warm-up.
    • Inspiratory muscle training abolishes the blood lactate increase associated with volitional hyperpnoea superimposed on exercise and accelerates lactate and oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise.

      Brown, Peter I.; Sharpe, Graham R.; Johnson, Michael A.; University of Derby, Department of Sport and Exercise (2012-06)
      We examined the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon volitional hyperpnoea-mediated increases in blood lactate ([lac(-)](B)) during cycling at maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) power, and blood lactate and oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. Twenty males formed either an IMT (n = 10) or control group (n = 10). Prior to and following a 6-week intervention, two 30 min trials were performed at MLSS (207 ± 28 W), determined using repeated 30 min constant power trials. The first was a reference trial, whereas during the second trial, from 20 to 28 min, participants mimicked the breathing pattern commensurate with 90% of the maximal incremental exercise test minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]). Prior to the intervention, the MLSS [lac(-)](B) was 3.7 ± 1.8 and 3.9 ± 1.6 mmol L(-1) in the IMT and control groups, respectively. During volitional hyperpnoea, [Formula: see text] increased from 79.9 ± 9.5 and 76.3 ± 15.4 L min(-1) at 20 min to 137.8 ± 15.2 and 135.0 ± 19.7 L min(-1) in IMT and control groups, respectively; [lac(-)](B) concurrently increased by 1.0 ± 0.6 (+27%) and 0.9 ± 0.7 mmol L(-1) (+25%), respectively (P < 0.05). Following the intervention, maximal inspiratory mouth pressure increased 19% in the IMT group only (P < 0.01). Following IMT only, the increase in [lac(-)](B) during volitional hyperpnoea was abolished (P < 0.05). In addition, the blood lactate (-28%) and phase II oxygen uptake (-31%) kinetics time constants at the onset of exercise and the MLSS [lac(-)](B) (-15%) were reduced (P < 0.05). We attribute these changes to an IMT-mediated increase in the oxidative and/or lactate transport capacity of the inspiratory muscles.
    • Loading of trained inspiratory muscles speeds lactate recovery kinetics.

      Brown, Peter I.; Sharpe, Graham R.; Johnson, Michael A.; University of Derby, Department of Sport and Exercise (2010-06)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on blood lactate concentration ([lac(-)]B) and acid-base balance after maximal incremental cycling.
    • Relationship between VO(2max) and repeated sprint ability using non-motorised treadmill ergometry.

      Brown, Peter I.; Hughes, Michael G.; Tong, Richard J.; University of Derby, Department of Sport and Exercise (2007-06)
      The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)) and repeated sprint ability (RSA) using non-motorised treadmill ergometry.