• Development and validation of a short-form Pain Medication Attitudes Questionnaire (PMAQ-14)

      Elander, James; Said, Omimah; Maratos, Frances A.; Dys, Ada; Collins, Hannah; Schofield, Malcolm B.; University of Derby (International Association for the Study of Pain, 2017-03-01)
      Attitudes to pain medication are important aspects of adjustment to chronic pain. They are measured by the 47-item Pain Medication Attitudes Questionnaire (PMAQ). To measure those attitudes more quickly and easily, we developed and evaluated a 14-item PMAQ using data from three separate surveys of people with pain in the general population. In survey 1, participants (n=295) completed the 47-item PMAQ and measures of pain, analgesic use, analgesic dependence and attitudes to self-medication. For each of the seven PMAQ scales, the two items that best preserved the content of the parent scales were identified using correlation and regression. The 2-item and parent scales had very similar relationships with other measures, indicating validity had been maintained. The resulting 14-item PMAQ was then completed by participants in survey 2 (n=241) and survey 3 (n=147), along with the same other measures as in survey 1. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the 14-item PMAQ retained the 7-factor structure of the 47-item version, and correlations with other measures showed it retained the validity of the 47-item version. The PMAQ scale Need was the most significant independent predictor of analgesic dependence in each of four separate multiple regression analyses. This short form of the PMAQ allows attitudes to pain medications to be measured in a valid and more efficient way.
    • Development and validation of the satisfaction with treatment for pain questionnaire (STPQ) among patients with sickle cell disease

      Bij, Deepali; Kapadi, Romaana; Schofield, Malcolm B.; Osias, Arlene; Khalid, Nosheen; Kaya, Banu; Telfer, Paul; Elander, James; University of Derby (Wiley, 2019-06-23)
      A brief measure of patient satisfaction with treatment for pain is needed to help improve the treatment of painful episodes caused by sickle cell disease (SCD), especially during and after the transition from paediatric to adult care. Focus groups of 28 adolescent and adult patients were consulted about the content, clarity and relevance of 30 potential items, resulting in an 18-item version. This was validated by analysing questionnaire responses from 120 patients aged 12-53 years. Confirmatory factor analysis and item analysis indicated five subscales with high internal reliability: ‘Communication and Involvement’ (6 items, α=0.87); ‘Respect and Dignity’ (3 items, α=0.82); ‘Pain Control’ (3 items, α=0.91); ‘Staff Attitudes and Behaviour’ (4 items, α=0.88); and ‘Overall Satisfaction’ (2 items, α=0.85); plus a Total Satisfaction score (18 items, α=0.96). High negative correlations with the Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire, a measure of problem experiences, indicated good convergent validity. Lower satisfaction scores among patients aged over 18 years, those admitted via the emergency department, those treated by non-specialist hospital staff, and those reporting more breakthrough pain indicated good concurrent validity. The questionnaire provides a convenient brief measure that can be used to inform and evaluate improvements in healthcare for adolescent and adult patients with SCD, and could potentially be adapted for other painful conditions.
    • Dissociative tendencies, sensory processing sensitivity and aberrant salience as predictors of anomalous experiences and paranormal attributions.

      Irwin, Harvey. J.; Schofield, Malcolm B.; Baker, Ian S.; University of Derby (Society for Psychical Research, 2014-10)
      An online survey completed by 307 adults was undertaken to examine the relationship between the reporting of parapsychological experiences and three psychological dimensions, namely dissociative tendencies, sensory-processing sensitivity and aberrant salience. In contrast with most previous studies of parapsychological experiences, cognizance was taken of a distinction between a proneness to have anomalous experiences and a proneness to attribute such experiences to paranormal factors. All three psychological predictors were found to be related both to a proneness to anomalous experiences and to a proneness to paranormal attributions. Possible implications of these findings for the basis of parapsychological experiences are indicated.
    • An international validation of a clinical tool to assess carers’ quality of life in Huntington’s Disease.

      Aubeeluck, Aimee; Stupple, Edward J. N.; Schofield, Malcolm B.; Hughes, Alis C.; van der Meer, Lucienne; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Ho, Aileen K.; University of Derby; University of Nottingham; Leiden University Medical Centre; et al. (Frontiers, 2019-07-23)
      Family carers of individuals living with Huntington’s disease (HD) manage a distinct and unique series of difficulties arising from the complex nature of HD. This paper presents the validation of the definitive measure of quality of life (QoL) for this group. The Huntington’s Disease Quality of Life Battery for Carers (HDQoL-C) was expanded (n = 47) and then administered to an international sample of 1716 partners and family carers from 13 countries. In terms of the psychometric properties of the tool, exploratory analysis of half of the sample demonstrated good internal consistency and reliability. Some items on the full version did not meet psychometric thresholds and a short version (HDQoL-Cs) (n = 23) was developed based on more stringent criteria. This was achieved using standard psychometric item reduction techniques to both increase reliability and reduce the burden of carers completing the scale. Confirmatory factor analysis of the model structure showed a good fit for all factors and indicated that the HDQoL-C and HDQoL-Cs are psychometrically robust measures of QoL. We found that carers who lived with and looked after their spouse/partner had reduced sense of coping, hope for the future, and overall QoL. Carers with children who were at risk carried the gene or were symptomatic also had poorer QoL outcomes. Findings indicated the HDQoL-C and HDQoL-Cs are valid in multiple languages and across varied cultures as measures of self-reported QoL in family carers of individual’s living with HD. These psychometrically validated tools can aid and guide the implementation of therapeutic interventions to improve life quality in this population and research into international and cross-cultural carer experiences. The HDQoL-Cs is recommended as the definitive international measure of HD carer QoL.
    • Mental representations of the supernatural: A cluster analysis of religiosity, spirituality and paranormal belief

      Schofield, Malcolm B.; Baker, Ian S.; Staples, Paul; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (2016-06-25)
      The aim of the study was to establish a new typology of belief in the supernatural; categorising people, based on their levels of religiosity, spirituality and paranormal belief. Examining how the various beliefs are defined was a further objective. The reasons for people having different levels of these beliefs were discussed, highlighting ‘Metaphysical Chauvinism’ as a possible explanation. Previous research that used variousmethods to measure religiosity, spirituality and paranormal belief were discussed. Participants (n = 307) completed an online survey consisting of the revised Religious Life Inventory (rRLI), the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale (ISS) and the revised Paranormal Belief Scale (rPBS). Two cluster analyses were performed: one on the three main scales and a secondary analysis on the ISS, the subscales of the rRLI and the rPBS. The results revealed a four cluster solution for each analysis. For the main analysis the clusters were ‘believers’, ‘paranormal believers’, ‘sceptics’ and ‘religious believers’. Metaphysical Chauvinism was supported; however, it was acknowledged that there still appears to be a lack of consensus when defining supernatural beliefs. It is proposed that the cluster analysis approach is more effective than a simple scale when trying establish how a person believes.
    • Motivational and behavioural models of change: A longitudinal analysis of change among men with chronic haemophilia-related joint pain

      Elander, James; Richardson, Cassandra; Morris, John; Robinson, Georgina; Schofield, Malcolm B.; University of Derby; University of Central Lancashire; Haemophilia Society UK; London Metropolitan University; Centre for Psychological Research; University of Derby; UK; et al. (Wiley, 2017-08-10)
      Background: Motivational and behavioral models of adjustment to chronic pain make different predictions about change processes, which can be tested in longitudinal analyses. Methods: We examined changes in motivation, coping and acceptance among 78 men with chronic hemophilia-related joint pain. Using cross-lagged regression analyses of changes from baseline to 6 months as predictors of changes from 6 to 12 months, with supplementary structural equation modelling, we tested two models in which motivational changes influence behavioral changes, and one in which behavioral changes influence motivational changes. Results: Changes in motivation to self-manage pain influenced later changes in pain coping, consistent with the motivational model of pain self-management, and also influenced later changes in activity engagement, the behavioral component of pain acceptance. Changes in activity engagement influenced later changes in pain willingness, consistent with the behavioral model of pain acceptance. Conclusions: Based on the findings, a combined model of changes in pain self-management and acceptance is proposed, which could guide combined interventions based on theories of motivation, coping and acceptance in chronic pain.