• Building career mobility: A critical exploration of career capital

      Brown, Cathy; Wond, Tracey; University of Derby (NICEC, 2018-10)
      Work transitions can be stressful to those who experience them, and yet are happening more frequently, as the notion of a job for life fades. Ensuring smooth and successful work transitions is therefore in the direct interests of individuals and, indirectly, employers. Using the career capital construct, this article explores how work transitions can be better negotiated by individuals. After introducing career capital, the article progresses to critically review two theoretical frameworks of career capital. To illustrate the discussion, one individual, a business leader in a wider study we are undertaking, is introduced to exemplify and illuminate our discussion of career capital. The article concludes by offering strategies to support career capital development.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building motivation, achievement and progression online: evaluating Brightside's approach to online mentoring. Executive Summary.

      Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (iCeGS, University of Derby, 2014-08)
      This report sets out the findings of an independent evaluation of Brightside conducted by the International Centre for Guidance Studies. Brightside is a charity that seeks to raise young people’s aspirations and awareness about education and career pathways and enhance their capability to achieve those aspirations. A mixed methods approach to evaluation was taken which combined interviews with Brightside staff and partners (representatives of organisations that used Brightside) with analysis of existing web statistics collected by Brightside, an online survey of mentees and a detailed content analysis of a sample of online mentoring conversations. Overall the evaluation found that Brightside is well regarded by its partners, and provides a tool which delivers high quality mentoring and clear impacts for participants (mentees). It is particularly effective in helping young people to transition to higher education by helping them to think about which university they want to apply to, and supporting them through the application process.
    • Building online employability: a guide for academic departments

      Longridge, Debra; Hooley, Tristram; Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2013-06)
      This guide will help academic departments to support students to think about their careers and to use the online environment wisely. Used badly the array of social media and online technologies can seriously disadvantage a students’ career development, but if used well they can support students to find out about and transition into their future career.
    • Building quality management systems: selecting the right methods and tools.

      Rocha-Lona, L.; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Kumar, V.; University of Derby; University of the West of England (CRC Press, 2013-06-25)
      Quality has quickly become one of the most important decision-making factors for consumers. And although organizations invest considerable resources into building the right quality management systems (QMSs), in many instances, the adoption of such quality improvement tools are just not enough. Building Quality Management Systems: Selecting the Right Methods and Tools explains exactly what directors, practitioners, consultants, and researchers must do to make better choices in the design, implementation, and improvement of their QMSs. Based on the authors’ decades of industrial experience working on business improvement projects for multinationals looking to design or improve their QMSs, the book discusses building QMSs based on two important organizational elements: needs and resources. It begins with an overview of QMSs and systems thinking and the impact of QMSs on financial performance. Illustrating the process management approach, it reviews the most well-known business and quality improvement models, methods, and tools that support a major QMS. The authors introduce their own time-tested methodology for designing, implementing, and enhancing your own QMS. Using their proven method, you will learn how to: - Implement a strategic quality plan based on your specific needs, capabilities, cost–benefits, policies, and business strategies - Select the right models, methods, and tools to be adopted as part of your QMS - Understand the critical success factors and implementation challenges - Evaluate the level of maturity of your QMS and your implementation efforts Highlighting the importance of quality as a way of life, this book supplies the understanding you’ll need to make the right choices in the development and deployment of your QMS. With a clear focus on business performance and process management, it provides the basis for creating the quality management culture required to become a world-class organization.
    • Building routines for non-routine events: Supply chain resilience learning mechanisms and their antecedents.

      Scholten, Kirstin; Sharkey Scott, Pamela; Fynes, Brian; University College Dublin; University of Groningen; Dublin City University (Emerald., 2019)
      Organisations must build resilience to be able to deal with disruptions or non-routine events in their supply chains. While learning is implicit in definitions of supply chain resilience, there is little understanding of how exactly organisations can adapt their routines to build resilience. The aim of this study is to address this gap. An in-depth qualitative case study based on 28 interviews across five companies exploring learning to build supply chain resilience. This study uncovers six learning mechanisms and their antecedents that foster supply chain resilience. The learning mechanisms identified suggest that, through knowledge creation within an organisation and knowledge transfer across the supply chain and broader network of stakeholders, operating routines are built and/ or adapted both intentionally and unintentionally during three stages of a supply chain disruption: preparation, response and recovery. This study shows how the impact of a supply chain disruption may be reduced by intentional and unintentional learning in all three disruption phases. By being aware of the antecedents of unintentional learning organisations can more consciously adapt routines. Furthermore, findings highlight the potential value of additional attention to knowledge transfer, particularly in relation to collaborative and vicarious learning across the supply chain and broader network of stakeholders not only in preparation for, but also in response to and recovery from disruptions. This study contributes novel insights about how learning leads both directly and indirectly to the evolution of operating routines that help an organisation and its supply chains to deal with disruptions. Results detail six specific learning mechanisms for knowledge creation and knowledge transfer and their antecedents for building supply chain resilience. In doing so, this study provides new fine grained theoretical insights about how supply chain resilience can be improved through all three phases of a disruption. Propositions are developed for theory development.
    • Burning Worm

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (IMPress, 2001)
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    • Business games and enterprise competitions. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Cox, Annette; Hooley, Tristram; The Careers and Enterprise Company; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-11-03)
      This paper provides the underpinning evidence on business games and enterprise competitions. Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying possible impacts from business games and enterprise competitions and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • Business games and enterprise competitions. What works?

      Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Cox, Annette; University of Derby (Careers and Enterprise Company, 2017-09)
      This paper provides the underpinning evidence on business games and enterprise competitions. Schools, colleges and providers of careers and enterprise programmes are invited to use this evidence to inform the programmes that they are running and developing. The paper draws together academic and ‘grey’ literature (such as policy papers, speeches and programme evaluation reports), with the aim of, first, clarifying possible impacts from business games and enterprise competitions and, second, exploring what effective practice looks like.
    • The business of invention: considering project management in the arts and industry

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Knowledge, Innovation & Enterprise, 2013)
      Project management has well developed theoretical constructs and is becom- ing increasingly well established in core strategy beyond the industrial and corporate sec- tors from which it first emerged. With a concurrent increase in the significance of innova- tion, project managing for creativity is an area of research and enquiry of considerable sig- nificance. Notionally occupying polar opposite cultural positions in terms of perspectives and processes of creativity, project management in the arts is widely considered to vary significantly from corporate strategy and process. If business were to be more generally characterised by ‘organisation’ and discipline, the arts are more commonly celebrated for disorganisation, indiscipline, and the fundamental challenge to organisation itself. Consid- ering both the confluences and variations between established project management theory in business and practice in the arts, this text introduces theoretical constructs pertaining to creative processes and highlights areas for consideration in the understanding and further development of project management theory.
    • The business of the body

      Holland, Fiona G.; University of Derby (Federation of Holistic Therapists, 2015-12)
    • CaCO3 Composite Images

      Jones, Rhiannon; Kelly, Traci; University of Derby (2019-11)
      A series of composite images were created to explore research-creation as a methodology for Kelly + Jones, through which they embraced the unknown to inform and develop the series of works into conceptual thinking around chalk deposits from past marine lives and how this is distilled into visual and audial practice. Kelly + Jones worked in two sites - an old school stairwell and a chalk pit and used their own bodies as sculptural soundscapes to form fragile and precarious interplay with the site. The documentation from the explorative residencies in the two sites in turn became the artwork and formed the series of composite images that were then commissioned by The Glass Tank, Oxford. The composite images create a visual relationship that explores the interplay between the artists’ bodies as site and landscape as site.
    • Caennenau

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (2019-03-15)
    • Caenorhabditis elegans, a model organism for investigating immunity.

      Marsh, Elizabeth K; May, Robin C; University of Birmingham (2012-03-09)
      The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful experimental organism for almost half a century. Over the past 10 years, researchers have begun to exploit the power of C. elegans to investigate the biology of a number of human pathogens. This work has uncovered mechanisms of host immunity and pathogen virulence that are analogous to those involved during pathogenesis in humans or other animal hosts, as well as novel immunity mechanisms which appear to be unique to the worm. More recently, these investigations have uncovered details of the natural pathogens of C. elegans, including the description of a novel intracellular microsporidian parasite as well as new nodaviruses, the first identification of viral infections of this nematode. In this review, we consider the application of C. elegans to human infectious disease research, as well as consider the nematode response to these natural pathogens.
    • A cage for the muse and the limits of invention

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      This paper explores the notion that creativity in the arts, particularly music, benefits from constraints. Expressive freedom is often fostered within education to encourage the pursuit of artistic individualism, but straying too far from stylistic norms can often engender incoherence. This paper does not challenge the breaking of rules that define a style nor does it denigrate the benefits that may arise from conflicting ideas and unusual combinations, but explores the virtue and benefits of boundaries and suggests that freedom, from a creative perspective, is often an illusory construct; strong creative identities are achievable through and often defined by creative constraints. Conclusions focus on the potential profits of constraints that bind expressive ideas and the function and virtue of intuition within the creative process; theorizing upon whether creative confinement, or the awareness thereof, is ultimately a liberating or inhibiting experience. We determine that artistic creative freedom as a concept may indeed be illusory, but the perception of freedom for some is a necessary ingredient in the creative act.
    • Can (unusual) weather conditions in New York predict South African stock returns?

      Apergis, Nicholas; Gupta, Ragan; University of Piraeus; University of Pretoria (Elsevier, 2017-05-03)
      This paper investigates the explanatory power of certain weather variables, measured as deviations from their monthly averages, in a leading international financial trading centre, i.e., New York, for South African stock returns, over the daily period January 2nd, 1973 to December, 31, 2015. The empirical results highlight that these unusual deviations of weather variables have a statistically significant negative effect on the stock returns in South Africa, indicating that unusual weather conditions in New York can be used to predict South African stock returns, which otherwise seems to be highly unpredictable. In fact, a forecasting exercise recommends that a trading rule that considers those weather variables through a GARCH modelling approach seems to outperform the random walk model and thus beat the market.
    • Can aspiration kill local community? Challenges for young people and career practitioners in Sri Lanka

      Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby, iCeGS (NICEC, 2013-10)
      Raising aspiration is a primary focus of careers work. However, in some circumstances enhanced aspirations may create tensions in situations of limited accessible opportunity. Additionally focusing on the autonomy of the individual and their choice can impact more broadly on local community. This article will explore the importance of locating career guidance in context, specifically in relation to some of the issues facing career practitioners working in Sri Lanka. These practitioners seek to inspire young people to a range of careers whilst remaining conscious of the individual and local impacts that may result. It will consider the concept of 'foundation' which encompasses the physical, social, religious and spiritual, cultural and political environment and the role this might play in providing a holistic model for career guidance.
    • Can compassion, happiness and sympathetic concern be differentiated on the basis of facial expression?

      Condliffe, Otto; Maratos, Frances A.; University of Shanghai; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-04-11)
      Recent research has demonstrated the importance of positive emotions, and especially compassion, for well-being. Via two investigations, we set out to determine if facial expressions of happiness, “kind” compassion and sympathetic concern can be distinguished, given limitations of previous research. In investigation one, prototypes of the three expressions were analysed for similarities and differences using the facial action coding system (FACS) by two certified independent coders. Results established that each expression comprised distinct FACS units. Thus, in investigation 2, a new photographic stimulus set was developed using a gender/racially balanced group of actors to pose these expressions of “kind” compassion, happiness, sympathetic concern, and the face in a relaxed/neutral pose. 75 participants were then asked to name the FACS generated expressions using not only forced categorical quantitative ratings but, importantly, free response. Results revealed that kind compassionate facial expressions: (i) engendered words associated with contented and affiliative emotions (although, interestingly, not the word “kind”); (ii) were labelled as compassionate significantly more often than any of the other emotional expressions; but (iii) in common with happiness expressions, engendered happiness word groupings and ratings. Findings have implications for understandings of positive emotions, including specificity of expressions and their veridicality.
    • Can flow state enhance learning on culinary arts programmes?

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2012-05-09)
      The research conducted investigates who is marketing what, to whom, and why. Finally conclusions/theories will be suggested as to the future of a ‘new’ form of culinary artistry as a form of academic rigour and relevance in terms of sustainability and growth of a 20 credit framework. “Repression is not the way to virtue. When people restrain themselves out of fear, their lives are by necessity diminished. Only through freely chosen discipline can life be enjoyed and still kept within the bounds of reason."[ Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1998)
    • Can gold prices forecast the Australian dollar movements?

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Elsevier, 2014-05-07)
      This paper explores whether gold prices have a reliable out-of-sample relationship with the Australian dollar/US dollar nominal and real exchange rates using daily and quarterly data, respectively, spanning the period 2000–2012. Through an Error Correction Model (ECM), the empirical findings suggest that the out-of-sample predictive ability is strong and robust across short- and long-run horizons. The results could offer informational availability for monetary policymakers, hedge fund managers and international portfolio managers. They also provide additional support to the hypothesis that both markets are driven by the same information sets.