• Understanding parents’ contribution to young people’s career decision-making

      Clark, Lewis; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021-04-01)
      This article summarises Erasumus funded research to establish the impacts on young people's career decsion making. The article presents data pertaining to parental influence.
    • Understanding the causes of problematic pain management in sickle cell disease: evidence that pseudoaddiction plays a more important role than genuine analgesic dependence

      Elander, James; Lusher, Joanne; Bevan, David; Telfer, Paul; Burton, Bernice; University of Derby (2004)
      Treatment of painful episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) is sometimes complicated by disputes between patients and staff and patient behaviors that raise concerns about analgesic misuse. Those concern-raising behaviors could indicate either drug seeking caused by analgesic dependence or pseudoaddiction caused by undertreatment of pain. To make a systematic assessment of concern-raising behaviors and examine their associations with other factors, including DSM-IV symptoms of substance dependence, individual, in-depth interviews with SCD patients were conducted to apply pre-established criteria for concernraising behaviors. These included disputes with staff, tampering with analgesic delivery systems, passing prescribed analgesics from one person to another, being suspected or accused of analgesic misuse, self-discharging from hospital, obtaining analgesic prescriptions from multiple sources, using illicit drugs, and injecting analgesics. Assessments were also made of pain-related symptoms of substance dependence (where behaviors resemble substance dependence but reflect attempts to manage pain, increasing the risk of pseudoaddiction), non-pain-related symptoms of substance dependence (where substance dependence reflects analgesic use beyond pain management), and pain coping strategies (using the Pain Coping Strategies Questionnaire). Inter-rater reliability for the assessment of concern-raising behaviors was high, with Kappa coefficients of 0.63 to 1.0. The most frequent concern-raising behaviors were disputes with staff about pain or analgesics. The least frequent were tampering with analgesic delivery systems and passing analgesics between patients in hospital. The odds of concern-raising behaviors in hospital were raised eightfold by less use of ignoring pain as a coping strategy, and more than doubled by each additional pain-related symptom of substance dependence. Non-painrelated symptoms of substance dependence had no independent effect on concern-raising behaviors. Concern-raising behaviors were more closely associated with pain behaviors that make patients vulnerable to misperceptions of substance dependence than they were with genuine substance dependence. The results show how pseudoaddiction can adversely influence hospital pain management, and suggest that more emphasis should be placed on patients’ pain and analgesic needs when responding to concern-raising behaviors in hospital.
    • Understanding the digital skills of the career development sector

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2020-01)
      This article summarises the findings of research which examines the digital skills of the career development sector.
    • Understanding the evaluation of access and participation outreach interventions for under 16 year olds.

      Harrison, Neil; Vigurs, Katy; Crockford, Julian; McCaig Colin; Squire, Ruth; Clark, Lewis; University of the West of England; University of Derby; University of Sheffield; Sheffield Hallam University (Office for Students, 2018-12-13)
      The project team was asked to address the following six research questions and these were used to guide the project: 1. What are the intended outcomes for current outreach interventions directed at under 16 year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds where the long-term aim is to widen access to higher education (HE)? 2. What types of outreach intervention activity or activities are institutions using in relation to intended outcomes? 3. What evaluation tools, methods and metrics are being used to measure the intended outcomes? 4. What are the perceived and actual challenges and barriers for different stakeholders to effective evaluation of long-term outreach? 5. What do different stakeholders consider most effective evaluation practice and why? 6. How valid and suitable are the evaluation tools, methods and metrics (identified through the research) that are commonly used? The project was constructed around six interlinked work packages: 1. A quantitative analysis of what higher education providers (HEPs) say about their pre-16 outreach activities (and their evaluation) in their 2017-18 access agreements (as the most recent available). 2. An online survey of HEPs to gather information about the pre-16 outreach activities delivered during the 2016-17 academic year and their evaluation, as well as the structure of their evaluation resources and challenges faced. 3. Case studies of four HEPs identified as demonstrating elements of good practice through their access agreements and the online survey, derived from telephone interviews with key staff and documentary analysis. 4. Telephone interviews with 11 third sector organisations (TSOs) to explore their practices and the evaluation of their activities, providing a counterpoint to the data collected from higher education institutions (HEIs). 5. A synthesis of the four preceding work packages to explore elements of good practice, determine a basis for assessing the quality of evaluations and highlight challenges for the sector and OFFA. 6. An invited participatory workshop for evaluators from HEPs and TSOs identified as demonstrating elements of good practice through the online survey and telephone interviews, to act as a sounding board for the emerging conclusions and recommendations.
    • Understanding the key drivers of and technology related issues associated with going multi-channel

      Lewis, J.; Foster, Carley; Whysall, P.; Nottingham Trent University (2012)
      A multi-channel retail strategy is viewed by many academics and practitioners to be the success model for most retailers. Yet, while there are many drivers of, and advantages related to, using multiple channels to sell products and services to customers likewise there are numerous technology-related issues. Despite this, the multi-channel retailing literature provides little empirical insight into these technology-related constraints. Moreover, there is a lack of multi-channel retailing research which explores the impetuses behind retailers adding new channels to go multi-channel, especially in the context of the UK retail sector. To contribute to gaps in the literature this study utilises a case study research strategy to examine the key motivations behind, and technology-related issues associated with, multi-channel retail strategic implementation, in the setting of the UK retail sector. Three UK based retailers (Boots, Screwfix and Bettys) are used which have different approaches to, and are at different stages of, adopting a multi-channel retail strategy. In addition, they have different backgrounds such as size, product range, sector and type. Consequently, the use of these three different retailers enables exploration of the drivers behind, and technological problems associated with, implementing a multi-channel retail strategy in the context of store and Internet/catalogue retailers. Case analysis reveals novel themes which are not identified, or not clearly recognised, in the literature. These include that key drivers behind retailers going multi-channel are to increase sales, and, meet the needs of the multi-channel shopper. Indeed, customers want to shop via multiple channels and therefore, these retailers have no choice but to go multi-channel if they are to meet customer needs. However, while at a strategic level these motivations were similar across the case study retailers, they also differed. For example, Screwfix added a store channel to enable customers to purchase products and receive them instantly. In contrast, Boots added an Internet channel to drive footfall in-store and increase store sales. Boots were also adding an Internet channel since it provided them with a marketing channel, which, going forward, was likely to replace other communications channels. The findings from this study also reveal that retailers encounter major technology-related issues when adding new, and using multiple, channels. These problems stem from the need to re-design existing logistics and IT infrastructure to offer a seamless, integrated offer to the customer. For instance, to leverage the brand and marketing mix consistently across all channels, and, to implement ‘click and collect’ (i.e. where customers purchase a product in one channel and collect it in another). Also, due to the need to use innovative marketing techniques, in particular, social media. Importantly, this study highlights that these technology-related multi-channel retailing constraints often have a ‘softer’ side. Technology-related problems are frequently intertwined with cultural, engagement and financial/staff resource related issues. This suggests a need for retailers to find entwined solutions to both technology and non- technology related issues to effectively implement a multi-channel retail strategy.
    • Understanding the recruitment and selection of postgraduate researchers by English higher education institutions

      Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Metcalfe, Janet; Pearce, Ellen; Hooley, Tristram; CRAC; Vitae; University of Derby (CRAC, 2014-09)
    • Understanding the role of the careers leader.

      The Careers & Enterprise Company; The Careers & Enterprise Company; Gatsby Charitable Foundation (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2018)
      This guide explains what a Careers Leader is and provides advice to schools on how best to identify someone to fill the role. The guide includes key principles and suggestions for developing the role, as well as practical case studies of Careers Leaders already working in schools.
    • Understanding the use of digital technology in the career development sector

      Moore, Nicki; Czerwinska, Karolina; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12-04)
      This research, funded jointly by the UK’s Career Development Institute and the University of Derby, has been conducted at a time of rapid change in the availability and use of digital technologies. A recommendation to develop digital skills to harness technology is not new and was first suggested by The Careers Profession Task Force (2010). This research aims to determine what progress has been made over the last nine years since the recommendation was made and seeks to determine: • How practitioners and managers use digital technology to deliver career development services • The potential for digital technology to deliver career development services; and • The training needs of career development practitioners so that they can use digital technology to deliver services, innovate solutions and solve problems in service delivery. The knowledge developed through this research will be used to develop professional support and training activities and services to organisations and individual career development practitioners. It will also be used by policy makers in the UK and beyond, who are tasked with the development of modern, cost-effective and client appropriate career development services.
    • Unethical consumer behaviour in an Islamic society - evidence from Libya

      Whysall, P.; Foster, Carley; Abdelhadi, A.; Nottingham Trent University (2013)
    • University Applicant Study: NEMCON.

      Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2017-10-01)
      The interest of the North East Midlands Collaborative Outreach Network (NEMCON) was to conduct a longitudinal study focusing on the applicant journey from year 12 to enrolment in HE. To do so would enable NEMCON partners to offer new and fresh insight into such themes as: the advice and guidance provided by schools and colleges prior to application; the effectiveness of communications with prospective students before and following offers; the appropriateness of activities and events aimed to inform prospective students of choices and options – in other words, it would aim to find out how young people choose to study where they study. The objectives of the longitudinal study were to gain a better understanding of: • The awareness of the options available to them post 18 and the importance of each • The factors which underpin decisions to attend HE or not • When decision making begins • The relative importance of key advisors; families, friends, schools/teachers, career practitioners • The relative importance of messages they pay attention to and the order in which they are consulted • The effect of institutional branding and reputation on applicant behaviour • How offers are converted into acceptances A longitudinal quantitative design with year 13 students was employed and found that students most often were applying to attend university. Primarily this was because they felt it would help them get a better job and because they were interested in the particular course they were applying for. University open days, websites and prospectuses were the most favoured sources of information although information seeking typically began with UCAS then faculty level information from different institutes. University reputation was important when deciding where to study but the students sampled had applied to both pre and post 1992 universities rather than Russell group or Oxbridge. Small sample sizes prevented the drawing of conclusions about differences in gender, ethnicity and SES. Future research might consider the implications of unconditional offers on decision making and future university attainment.
    • Unnatural women: reflections on discourses on child murder and selective mortal neglect

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Demeter Press, 2020-01)
      While the existence of maternal ambivalence has been evident for centuries, it has only recently been recognized as central to the lived experience of mothering. This accessible, yet intellectually rigorous, interdisciplinary collection demonstrates its presence and meaning in relation to numerous topics such as pregnancy, birth, Caesarean sections, sleep, self-estrangement, helicopter parenting, poverty, environmental degradation, depression, anxiety, queer mothering, disability, neglect, filicide and war rape. Its authors deny the assumption that mothers who experience ambivalence are bad, evil, unnatural, or insane. Moreover, historical records and cross-cultural narratives indicate that maternal ambivalence appears in a wide range of circumstances; but that it becomes unmanageable in circumstances of inequity, deprivation and violence. From this premise, the authors in this collection raise imperative ethical, social, and political questions, suggesting possibilities for vital cultural transformations. These candid explorations demand we rethink our basic assumptions about how mothering is experienced in everyday life.
    • Unsatisfactory devices: legacy and the undocumentable in art.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      Regarding perception of ephemeral artwork when lost to the fractures of time Peggy Phelan states “you have to be there.” For Phelan ephemera, specifically performance “become[s] itself through disappearance,” which draws empathy with Walter Benjamin’s notion of the “aura of the original.” In practice this a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing such artworks, for how can they exist beyond the moment of making if not recorded, in order to map their histories? This essay interrogates the critical, sensitive and individualized distance necessary to archive transient artworks. Moving beyond the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation, it interrogates how divergent and sympathetic modes of practice allow for a greater level of sustainable critique. This complex and problematic terrain is analysed in response to The Alternative Document, an exhibition I curated on the subject in 2016, and suggests archival possibilities beyond formal academic, artistic and museological conventions.
    • Unsavoury thoughts

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (Meraki greetings cards, 2018-01)
      Investigation into trends within the industry, exploring varied audiences for the gift market. Research of current Illustration competition, use of humour and subjects in the industry. A body of visual experimentation and process to challenge and create contemporary illustrated outcomes in the field of design. Visual research into drawing and experimentation into line quality, characterisation and developing appropriate characters for audience. Distributed nationally currently featured in UK retail outlets such as Paperchase.
    • Unsettling action and text: a collaborative experience.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Routledge, 2016)
      The original abstract for this text was written in 2009, and reflected the beginning of a collaboration informed by two individuals’ research confidences and disciplines. A work titled ‘Oral/Response’, which combined the documentation of a performance within its structure, allowed a conversation to emerge between disciplines and ways of working, of live action and its textual documentation. ‘Oral / Response’ explored the dynamic, but often disjointed relationship between these two linked but separate elements within the performance itself. The simultaneous dialogue between action and text in this work aimed to highlight the ways in which performance and its legacy as documentation can be reflexive and co-dependent. By making the text as evanescent as the act it describes, this work became the foundation of a new form of practice for both collaborators, a nexus of theory and practice that combined different languages, different ways of knowing and experiencing. The rules and regulations that direct and confine solo compositions in text and action became less rigid, more malleable and symbiotic. In the interim and beyond this work the collaboration has developed in such a way that the distinction between these disciplines, specifically in critical theory and arts practice, has become insignificant. While initially the partnership provided access to each other’s disciplines there is now fluidity, confidence, and trust whereby the roles ascribed to each varies depending on the requirement of the work. The lines have become blurred, and the separation of roles foggy allowing each collaborator the safety and space to take risks by entering domains that are less familiar research methodologies. Therefore the collaboration, aside from the actual work produced, has a significant extra dimension - it allows each partner to become confident and articulate in the others field. Dynamic elements have been liberated for the possibility of an analysis of the range of co-efficiencies and motivations that abound from this fusion, and speaks of the nature of collaboration itself. A reflexivity in approach and position has reshaped, informed, and re-informed the possibilities for emergent research, where trust allows each participant to be confident in a range of methods for creating knowledge. This chapter traces the development of the collaborative relationship from its beginning in two distinct areas of expertise and strength to a partnership where there is now more overlapping of roles.
    • Untangling the origin of ghost gear within the Maldivian archipelago and its impact on olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) populations

      Stelfox, M; Bulling, M; Sweet, M; University of Derby; Olive Ridley Project, Cheshire (Inter-Research Science Center, 2019-12-12)
      There is little documentation available on the impact of abandoned, lost or discarded fishing nets (‘ghost nets’) on turtle populations. Here, we utilise data collected over a 5 year period to assess (1) if a particular net type or characteristic was identifiable as entangling more turtles and (2) if particular fishing practices (i.e. types of nets) could be managed to reduce turtle entanglement in the Maldivian archipelago. A total of 131 turtles were entangled in the 752 reported ghost nets, and olive ridley turtles Lepidochelys olivacea appeared to be the most vulnerable (making up 97% of entangled turtles). However, we estimate that the 752 nets in this study, reported over a 51 month period, could have entangled between 3400 and 12200 turtles across the Indian Ocean prior to being detected in the Maldives. Mesh size, seasonality (i.e. north east monsoon), and the presence of floats were all identified as variables significantly affecting the likelihood of turtle entanglement. The probability of entanglement increased as the mesh size increased but decreased when floats were present. Additionally, turtles were more likely to be entangled during the north east monsoon when currents flow from east to west. Cluster analysis indicated that there were at least 11 broadly assigned net types found floating in the study area, and these were dominated by trawl and gill nets. Our analyses highlight the need for a detailed database of existing gear types coupled with gear marking to improve traceability of ghost nets in the Indian Ocean.
    • ‘Unveiling Orientalism in reverse’

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Continuum Bloomsbury, 2011)
      This volume is centred around the theme of veiling in Islam and provides multifarious aspects of the discussion regarding veiling of Muslim women, especially in the West. The issue of veiling has been intensively debated in Western society and has implications for religious liberty, inter-communal relationships and cultural interaction. Islam and the Veil seeks to generate open and objective discussion of this highly important, though controversial, subject, with contributions from distinguished scholars and academics, including female practitioners of Islam. This subject has inflamed passions and generated heated debate in the media in recent years, particularly in the West. This book aims to look at the historical background, theological and social factors underlying the veiling of women in Islam. Such discussion will provide the reader with a well-balanced and unbiased analysis of this important aspect of Islamic practice.
    • Urban badger setts: characteristics, patterns of use and management implications

      Davison, John; Huck, Maren; Delahay, R. J.; Roper, Timothy J.; University of Sussex (2013-06-10)
      Damage caused by badger setts is an important source of human–carnivore conflict in urban areas of the UK, yet little is known about the spatial distribution of urban badger setts or their pattern of occupation. We compared the density, spatial distribution and size of setts in four urban and two rural study areas in the UK and assessed the applicability to urban systems of distinguishing between ‘main’ and ‘outlier’ setts. In addition, we used radio-telemetry to investigate diurnal patterns of sett use in one urban area (Brighton). It was possible to distinguish between main and outlier setts in urban environments, and local sett densities were comparable in urban and rural areas. However, urban badgers used substantially fewer setts than did a nearby rural population, and they spent a smaller proportion of days in outlier setts. Social groups with larger ranges had more setts available to them and, within groups, individuals with larger ranges used more setts. Outliers appeared to serve multiple functions, including allowing efficient and safe travel to important parts of the home range. We conclude that sett densities can be high in urban habitats, suggesting significant potential for settrelated problems to arise. The fact that urban main setts can be distinguished from outliers enables management actions to be tailored accordingly. In particular, because main setts seem to represent a particularly valuable resource to urban
    • Urban biodiversity and landscape ecology: Patterns, processes and planning

      Norton, Briony, A.; Evans, Karl L.; Warren, Philip H.; University of Sheffield (Springer, 2016-11-21)
      Effective planning for biodiversity in cities and towns is increasingly important as urban areas and their human populations grow, both to achieve conservation goals and because ecological communities support services on which humans depend. Landscape ecology provides important frameworks for understanding and conserving urban biodiversity both within cities and considering whole cities in their regional context, and has played an important role in the development of a substantial and expanding body of knowledge about urban landscapes and communities. Characteristics of the whole city including size, overall amount of green space, age and regional context are important considerations for understanding and planning for biotic assemblages at the scale of entire cities, but have received relatively little research attention. Studies of biodiversity within cities are more abundant and show that longstanding principles regarding how patch size, configuration and composition influence biodiversity apply to urban areas as they do in other habitats. However, the fine spatial scales at which urban areas are fragmented and the altered temporal dynamics compared to non-urban areas indicate a need to apply hierarchical multi-scalar landscape ecology models to urban environments. Transferring results from landscape-scale urban biodiversity research into planning remains challenging, not least because of the requirements for urban green space to provide multiple functions. An increasing array of tools is available to meet this challenge and increasingly requires ecologists to work with planners to address biodiversity challenges. Biodiversity conservation and enhancement is just one strand in urban planning, but is increasingly important in a rapidly urbanising world.
    • Urban meadows as an alternative to short mown grassland: effects of composition and height on biodiversity

      Norton, Briony, A.; Bending, Gary, D.; Clark, Rachel; Corstanje, Ron; Dunnett, Nigel; Evans, Karl, L.; Grafius, Darren, R.; Gravestock, Emily; Grice, Samuel, M.; Harris, Jim, A.; et al. (Ecological Society of America, 2019-07-22)
      There are increasing calls to provide greenspace in urban areas, yet the ecological quality, as well as quantity, of greenspace is important. Short mown grassland designed for recreational use is the dominant form of urban greenspace in temperate regions but requires considerable maintenance and typically provides limited habitat value for most taxa. Alternatives are increasingly proposed, but the biodiversity potential of these is not well understood. In a replicated experiment across six public urban greenspaces, we used nine different perennial meadow plantings to quantify the relative roles of floristic diversity and height of sown meadows on the richness and composition of three taxonomic groups: plants, invertebrates, and soil microbes. We found that all meadow treatments were colonized by plant species not sown in the plots, suggesting that establishing sown meadows does not preclude further locally determined grassland development if management is appropriate. Colonizing species were rarer in taller and more diverse plots, indicating competition may limit invasion rates. Urban meadow treatments contained invertebrate and microbial communities that differed from mown grassland. Invertebrate taxa responded to changes in both height and richness of meadow vegetation, but most orders were more abundant where vegetation height was longer than mown grassland. Order richness also increased in longer vegetation and Coleoptera family richness increased with plant diversity in summer. Microbial community composition seems sensitive to plant species composition at the soil surface (0–10 cm), but in deeper soils (11–20 cm) community variation was most responsive to plant height, with bacteria and fungi responding differently. In addition to improving local residents’ site satisfaction, native perennial meadow plantings can produce biologically diverse grasslands that support richer and more abundant invertebrate communities, and restructured plant, invertebrate, and soil microbial communities compared with short mown grassland. Our results suggest that diversification of urban greenspace by planting urban meadows in place of some mown amenity grassland is likely to generate substantial biodiversity benefits, with a mosaic of meadow types likely to maximize such benefits.
    • US partisan conflict uncertainty and oil prices

      Apergis, Nicholas; Hayat, Tasawar; Saeed, Tareq; University of Derby; King Abdulaziz, University, Saudi Arabia; Quaid-I-Azam University, Pakistan (Elsevier BV, 2021-01-13)
      This empirical study significantly contributes in building emerging literature by investigating the impact of US partisan conflict uncertainty on international oil prices. It models oil prices through non-linear Quantile Autoregressive Distributed Lag (QARDL) methods in order to consider potential (non-linear) asymmetric effects of partisan political uncertainty on oil prices. The empirical results clearly document the asymmetric (non-linear) impact of partisan conflict uncertainty on international oil prices, which has been in contrast to the linear case. The findings also expose that the transmission mechanism of partisan political uncertainty to oil prices is validated through the economic growth channel. The empirical findings contribute to existing research by assisting investors in the oil industry with risk identification, analysis, and mitigation. The results can assist in discovering the links between US political risk and oil markets, determining an important element of political risk factors facing investors who want to participate in the oil industry.