• Using entropy and AHP-TOPSIS for comprehensive evaluation of internet shopping malls and solution optimality

      Kumar, Anil; Dash, Manoj Kumar; Seharawat, Ritu; University of Derby; Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior, India (Inderscience, 2017-02-21)
      Consumers are switching from offline to online to buy everything due to this reason nowadays Internet shopping malls (ISMs) are setting up a very crucial role in the economy. For assessment and ranking are basically a critical work which could be exploitation of Internet shopping malls information resources when consider in a scientific way, there are many methods for the evaluation and ranking of e-commerce sites. Taking into consideration Traffic Rank, Inbound Links, Competition, Speed, and Keyword Statistics, in literature Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods are rarely used by the researchers to find the rank of Internet Shopping Malls (ISMs) on the basis of primary/secondary data of these influencing factors. This study, therefore, is unique to narrow down the gap in literature by employing MCDM methods i.e. Entropy and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to collect the weight of influencing factors and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal (TOPSIS) to find the rank of Internet Shopping Malls (ISMs). After finding out the rank of selected criteria, solution optimality needs to be done to find the average ideal solution matrix. Conclusion and managerial implications of the study are also discussed.
    • Using figured worlds to explore parents' attitudes and influences for choosing the content of primary school packed lunches

      Jackson, Jessica; Giles, David; Gerrard, Clarabelle; University of Derby (MAG Online Library, 2019-09-30)
      This study aimed to explore parents' attitudes toward the content of their child's packed lunch, school healthy eating policies, and their child's wishes. Furthermore, in this context, it also aimed to explore perceptions of health promotional materials and how these interventions interplayed with issues parents felt were important. The ideology of ‘figured worlds’ was used as a stance to consider the relationship between bounding structures within society and the individual positional identity. Focus groups interviews obtained qualitative data of parents' multiple viewpoints. Iterative categorisation was employed as a method of analysis to observed findings in the data in relation to the individuals as intersubjective beings and their behaviour influenced by environmental conditions. A cross selection of local schools and parenting network were approached. Snowballing techniques were implemented highlighting the inclusion criteria. Participants were required to have a child attending primary school who they provided a packed lunch for on a regular basis. Three umbrella themes were identified: ‘The parents ideal’, ‘The child's desires’, and ‘Inconsistencies of the governing school’. A fourth theme, ‘The health promotional intrusion’ provides insight into the parents' reality when being presented with health promotional materials. This study has highlighted the complex, conflicting interplay between parents' ideal for their child's diet, their child's desires and the governing approaches to encouraging healthier choices. This understanding is vital when designing specific interventions to meet the needs of individuals, which prevent, protect and promote a healthy lifestyle for children and their families.
    • Using flashcards to support your learning.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (Informa Healthcare, 2012-03)
      The idea that if you listen to a lecture and make notes you will, by some mysterious process, have learnt all that the lecturer has covered, is a myth. Unfortunately, the lecture is just the start. The best way to learn is by doing. This can be achieved by completing set practical tasks by reading and creating your own notes, listening again to parts or the whole of a lecture via a screencast or using diagrams and illustrations that you annotate. Similarly creating your own learning materials can be useful as actually putting questions and answers together helps you to learn. One of the many ways to support your learning, especially in difficult topics like anatomy and physiology, learning about bones, medical terminology or indeed any subject where there are a lot of new words and terms to learn, is making use of an old technique brought up to date with new technologies called "flashcards".
    • Using Fuzzy Delphi and Generalized Fuzzy TOPSIS to Evaluate Technological Service Flexibility Dimensions of Internet Malls

      Kumar, Anil; Dash, Manoj Kumar; BML Munjal University; Indian Institute of Information Technology & Management, Gwalior (Springer, 2017-02-20)
      The expanding development of technology and availability of the internet is leading a consumer shift from offline to online activity. This shifting behavior shows positive signs for the growth of the e-commerce market but also increases the challenges for the online service provider to provide satisfaction and loyalty to consumers when there is no personal interaction between buyer and seller. In these circumstances, quality, in terms of technology services i.e. web/transaction, can play a significant role for the service provider, especially for internet shopping malls. But there is little material available in current literature to build a theoretical model for web/transaction flexibility dimensions and to rank internet shopping malls on their provision of services to customers. The vagueness of the available information can be tackled by fuzzy theory by employing a Fuzzy Delphi method to finalize technological service dimensions and lead to development of a research model. The final ranking of internet malls has been achieved by utilizing Generalized Fuzzy TOPSIS. The findings of this study can be useful for internet shopping malls in devising strategies to provide a better quality of web/transaction service to customers.
    • Using GIS-linked Bayesian Belief Networks as a tool for modelling urban biodiversity.

      Corstanje, Ron; Warren, Philip H.; Evans, Karl L.; Siriwardena, Gavin M.; Pescott, Oliver L.; Plummer, Kate E.; Mears, Meghann; Zawadzka, Joanna; Richards, J. Paul; Harris, Jim A.; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-05-30)
      The ability to predict spatial variation in biodiversity is a long-standing but elusive objective of landscape ecology. It depends on a detailed understanding of relationships between landscape and patch structure and taxonomic richness, and accurate spatial modelling. Complex heterogeneous environments such as cities pose particular challenges, as well as heightened relevance, given the increasing rate of urbanisation globally. Here we use a GIS-linked Bayesian Belief Network approach to test whether landscape and patch structural characteristics (including vegetation height, green-space patch size and their connectivity) drive measured taxonomic richness of numerous invertebrate, plant, and avian groups. We find that modelled richness is typically higher in larger and better-connected green-spaces with taller vegetation, indicative of more complex vegetation structure and consistent with the principle of ‘bigger, better, and more joined up’. Assessing the relative importance of these variables indicates that vegetation height is the most influential in determining richness for a majority of taxa. There is variation, however, between taxonomic groups in the relationships between richness and landscape structural characteristics, and the sensitivity of these relationships to particular predictors. Consequently, despite some broad commonalities, there will be trade-offs between different taxonomic groups when designing urban landscapes to maximise biodiversity. This research demonstrates the feasibility of using a GIS-coupled Bayesian Belief Network approach to model biodiversity at fine spatial scales in complex landscapes where current data and appropriate modelling approaches are lacking, and our findings have important implications for ecologists, conservationists and planners.
    • Using GPS telemetry to validate least-cost modeling of gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolinensis) movement within a fragmented landscape

      Stevenson, Claire D.; Ferryman, Mark; Nevin, Owen T.; Ramsey, Andrew; Bailey, Sallie; Watts, Kevin; University of Cumbria; Forest Research UK (Wiley, 2013)
      In Britain, the population of native red squirrels Sciurus vulgaris has suffered population declines and local extinctions. Interspecific resource competition and disease spread by the invasive gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis are the main factors behind the decline. Gray squirrels have adapted to the British landscape so efficiently that they are widely distributed. Knowledge on how gray squirrels are using the landscape matrix and being able to predict their movements will aid management. This study is the first to use global positioning system (GPS) collars on wild gray squirrels to accurately record movements and land cover use within the landscape matrix. This data were used to validate Geographical Information System (GIS) least-cost model predictions of movements and provided much needed information on gray squirrel movement pathways and network use. Buffered least-cost paths and least-cost corridors provide predictions of the most probable movements through the landscape and are seen to perform better than the more expansive least-cost networks which include all possible movements. Applying the knowledge and methodologies gained to current gray squirrel expansion areas, such as Scotland and in Italy, will aid in the prediction of potential movement areas and therefore management of the invasive gray squirrel. The methodologies presented in this study could potentially be used in any landscape and on numerous species.
    • Using Hadrian for eliciting virtual user feedback in 'Design For All'

      Marshall, Russell; Porter, J. Mark; Case, Keith; Sims, Ruth; Gyi, Diane E.; Loughborough University (2004)
      Design for All' is an approach to product, environment or service design that aims to maximise the usability of a particular design. However, a key concept of this approach is not to tailor designs to the user in a bespoke fashion, but rather to provide a single solution that accommodates the needs of all users including those who are older or disabled. In order to support the designer / design team in ‘Design for All’ a computer aided design and analysis tool has been developed. The tool, known as HADRIAN, has been developed to address two critical factors. The first factor is the provision of accurate and applicable data on the target users including a broad spectrum of size, shape, age and ability. The second factor is an efficient and effective means of utilising the data for ergonomics evaluations during the concept stages of design. HADRIAN’s database and task analysis tool work in combination with the existing human modelling system SAMMIE. The system as a whole allows assessment of a design against the population in the database providing a means to elicit some of the feedback that might be gained by real user trials at a stage in the design process when physical mock-ups and user group selection would be prohibitively time consuming and expensive.
    • Using journal alerts to support your continuing professional development

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-04-06)
      There are many ways to keep up to date with research that affect your role and personal development. You can regularly use PubMed or Scholar to find recent papers using keyword search, you can rely on others to do the work for you with literature reviews, share the job with Journal clubs or using Journal alerts you can have the papers and research you want delivered to your inbox.
    • Using model systems to address the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning process

      Bulling, Mark T.; White, Piran C. L.; Raffaelli, D.; Pierce, Graham J. (2013-06-11)
      Declines in biodiversity resulting from anthropogenic disturbance to ecosystems have focused attention on the role of biodiversity in ecosystem functioning. However, the high level of complexity of ecosystems has made this a difficult topic to investigate. Much simpler model systems incorporating small-scale, spatially delimited, artificial assemblages of species have been widely used recently to address the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF). Their simplicity lends tractability to these systems, but has also resulted in much criticism in the literature over their relevance. Here, we examine the strengths and limitations of model systems and examine how useful these systems might be in addressing several issues that are likely to represent future challenges to understanding BEF: spatial scale, multiple trophic levels, variation, environmental stochasticity and the choice of representative combinations of species. We find that model systems have already played an important role in enhancing our understanding of BEF and are likely to continue this role in the future. However, they do have important limitations, and it is essential to take these into account when putting results into the broader context of ecosystems and to improve the level of integration of results with those from other methodologies.
    • Using research papers: citations, referencing and plagiarism.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (Informa Healthcare, 2012-06)
      As a profession when we look to expand our skills, learn new techniques and expand visual communication in healthcare as an area of knowledge research papers become a valuable resource as references, to support this work. This Learning and CPD worksheet looks at citing, referencing and discusses plagiarism as well as giving advice on how to check references and think about using reference management software.
    • Using scenarios to explore employee attitudes in retailing

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (EmeraldBingley, 2011)
      Purpose: The aim of the paper is to explore how hypothetical scenarios can be used to study individual employee attitudes towards diversity and equality initiatives in retailing. Design/methodology/approach: Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted with a range of staff working in three business units belonging to a UK retailer. As part of the interviews, respondents were asked to comment on four work based scenarios exploring customer and employee diversity issues. Findings: The paper proposes that scenarios can be a useful method for exploring the hidden meanings retail employees have towards ethical issues such as diversity management. However, they may not always be useful for furthering knowledge of the area. This is because responses to the scenarios in this study frequently contradicted the respondent’s real-life work experiences explored in the rest of the interview. This suggests that, when commenting on the scenarios, interviewees did not always ground their responses so that they reflected their role in the retailer and their own diversity. Originality/Value: The study argues that hypothetical scenarios, if used in retail research or for retail training and development purposes, should have ecological validity. In order to obtain an accurate picture of individual attitudes and to tease out what an individual might do (the rhetoric) from what they have actually experienced (the reality), those researching in the retail industry should use a range of qualitative methods to study the same issue.
    • Using the Delphi method to verify a framework to implement sustainability initiatives.

      Gallotta, Bruno; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Anosike, Anthony; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2018-03)
      The paper provides a Delphi study to verify the framework to implement sustainability initiatives in the business processes. The Delphi technique seeks to obtain consensus on the opinions of experts, termed panel members, through a series of questionnaires. As part of the process, the responses from each round are fed back in summarized form to the participants who are then given an opportunity to respond again to the emerging data. The study successfully obtained a consensus in the phases and steps of the conceptual framework and provided feedback from the specialists. According to them, leadership, people and cost were identified as the main challenges related to the sustainability adoption by the organisations and key performance indicators (KPIs), Lifecycle assessment (LCA) and triple bottom line (TBL) were identified as the main methods to assess al the sustainability dimensions in terms of business processes.
    • Using the theoretical domains framework to improve access to cervical screening for women with intellectual disabilities

      Whitelegg, Victoria; Elander, James; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 2020-07-03)
      Regular attendance for screening can prevent most cervical cancers, but women with learning disabilities are potentially at greater risk of developing and dying from cervical cancer because current screening processes and practices create inequitable barriers, restricting their access to screening. In response, an objective of Public Health England’s 2018 ‘Screening Inequalities Strategy’ was to reduce inequalities through ‘evidence-based contributions’ to policy and best practice (Public Health England, 2018b). Health psychologists could contribute to this objective by facilitating collaborative work with cervical screening practitioners using the Theoretical Domains Framework. This enables health psychology evidence and theory, combined with the perceptions and experiences of screening practitioners, to identify relevant barriers and enablers to access, and this information can inform interventions and policy changes to make cervical screening programmes more open and effective for women with learning disabilities.
    • Using Twitter to tackle peripherality? Facilitating networked scholarship for part-time doctoral students within and beyond the university

      Vigurs, Katy (Faculty of Arts, Charles Sturt University, 2016-06-23)
      Feeling part of a community has previously been found to be a motivating factor for part-time doctoral students as well as speeding up doctoral progress. Separately, it has also been suggested that social media usage (specifically Twitter) can encourage the development of interactive academic networks to establish social relations with relevant people beyond the doctoral supervisory team. Drawing on Lave and Wenger’s theory of legitimate peripheral participation, and building particularly on the work of Teeuwsen et al. (2014), this paper suggests that the use of social media in doctoral education can be one way for part-time doctoral students to migrate from a position of academic peripherality to one of legitimate peripheral participation in a wider research community. This paper investigates the use of social media for academic purposes by three different groups of part-time doctoral students. It explores the ways in which Twitter might be used to help part-time doctoral students feel part of the research community both within a University and the wider research community beyond. It also identifies some of the barriers and limitations to achieving this. Finally, the paper raises questions about the roles and responsibilities of supervisors and other faculty members in relation to using social media to support the learning of part-time doctoral students.
    • A utilitarian antagonist: the zombie in popular video games

      Hunt, Nathan; The University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This article takes as its starting point the prevalence of the zombie in video games. I argue that, although the zombie games often superficially resemble filmic texts in their use of aesthetic and narrative, they must be understood, less as a set of conventions and thematic metaphors in the way that the zombie text has been read in film and television scholarship, and more as a utilisation of the zombie as a utilitarian antagonist that facilitates and permits the pleasures of violence and fantasy in video game play. Beginning with the Resident Evil and Left 4 Dead series of games I examine the way that games necessarily update the notion zombie as mass antagonist via the need to vary gameplay activity through different styles of adversary for players. At the same time I will demonstrate that, far from simply being the province of the survival horror genre, the zombie appears across an array of game forms, game cultures and game productions. The zombie highlights the participatory nature of game culture in the array of zombie 'mods' that users create to transform existing games into zombie based games, in particular in relation to titles such as the Call of Duty series. At the other end of the production spectrum the zombie features heavily in the little studied area of online flash games where the zombie can be found in a variety of game genres and forms. The zombie here often operates as a pastiche of popular zombie narratives in survival games (The Last Stand), parodic engagements with zombie conventions (Jetpacks and Zombies) or play with the notion of zombie pandemics (the Infectionator games). Here I situate the zombie game as a aesthetic genre that works to provide an easily understandable context for such interactive genres as survival horror, text adventures, shooting games, physics games and driving games, with the popularity of these enough to drive numerous dedicated hosting and link sites such as zombiegames.net. The pastiche element of these games extends into gamers social engagement with games. Online debates over the the appropriate actions or preparation for a zombie holocaust are commonplace on the internet in such spaces as Zombieresearch.net. Whilst many of these sites feature decidedly tongue in cheek engagement with the notion of the zombie apocalypse, the users of fora for games like Left 4 Dead and Dead Island tend to debate this directly in the terms of the games themselves, discussing their relative merits or realism. Some of these games also highlight the specific pleasures of identifying the zombie as protagonist of sorts. In discussing this I will return to online gaming and the Left 4 Dead games in which players may compete online as part of the zombie horde. Such games raise major questions for the issues of identification and immersion that are said to be at the centre of the game experience. I will also explore the parodic pleasures of many flash games that situate the player in the role of spreading zombie infections. Throughout this article I aim to demonstrate that the zombie in game culture is less a cultural metaphor than a combination of utilitarian antagonist and a persistent aesthetic; a means of providing style or pleasure to many games that relies on the intertextual and flexible nature of the zombie as popular cultural phenomenon.
    • Validação da escala percepção de autoeficácia daparentalidade materna em amostra brasileira

      Adamson-Macedo, Elvidina N.; Tristao, Rosana; Neiva , Elaine; Barnes, Christopher; University of Derby; University of Oxford; Universidade de Brasília; University of Wolverhampton (Revista Brasileira de Crescimento e Desenvolvimento Humano, 2015-10-25)
      Self-efficacy matches the belief that a person has that she is able to produce theresults she wants to achieve. The beliefs of self-efficacy that parents have about the baby emerge asa powerful predictor of positive parenting. Objective: this study aimed to evaluate the maternalself-efficacy behavior in hospitalized mothers and validate an instrument for measuring this conceptdeveloped and validated in England by Barnes and Adamson-Macedo, in 2007. Method: this cross-sectional exploratory study convenience cohort comprised 87 mothers of newborn babies, 26premature and 61 full-term infants. The scale Perceived Maternal Parenting Self-Efficacy (PMP S-E),which consists of 20 items that represent four subscales was tested for reliability and validity. Results:the internal consistency of the scale PAEPM reached a value of .86, the internal consistency andreliability estimates for each of the subscales also reached acceptable values. Exploratory FactorAnalysis (EFA) confirmed the validity of the construct and the scores of self-efficacy were normallydistributed for both subgroups and total sample. Conclusions: PMP S-E scale proved to be an easyapplication tool and psychometrically robust, reliable and valid for use with mothers of hospitalizednew-borns both premature as the term clinically stable. It is a reliable method of identifying mothersof babies who need more support from the hospital staff.
    • Validation of a quad-rotor helicopter matlab/simulink and solidworks models

      Poyi, Gwangtim Timothy; Wu, Mian Hong; Bousbaine, Amar; Wiggins, Bruce (IET Control and Automation Conference, 2013-06-04)
    • Validation of the English version of the scale for psychosocial factors in food allergy and the relationship with mental health, quality of life, and self-efficacy

      Knibb, Rebecca C.; Cortes, Aaron; Barnes, Christopher; Stalker, Carol; Aston University; University of Derby; Universidad de Chile Clinical Hospital (2016-08-21)
      Background. The Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy (SPS-FA) is based on the biopsychosocial model of health and was developed and validated in Chile to measure the interaction between psychological variables and allergy symptoms in the child. We sought to validate this scale in an English speaking population and explore its relationship with parental quality of life, self-efficacy, and mental health. Methods. Parents (𝑛 = 434) from the general population in the UK, who had a child with a clinical diagnosis of food allergy, completed the SPS-FA and validated scales on food allergy specific parental quality of life (QoL), parental self-efficacy, and general mental health. Findings. The SPS-FA had good internal consistency (alphas = .61–.86). Higher scores on the SPS-FA significantly correlated with poorer parental QoL, self-efficacy, and mental health. All predictors explained 57% of the variance in SPS-FA scores with QoL as the biggest predictor (𝛽 = .52). Discussion. The SPS-FA is a valid scale for use in the UK and provides a holistic view of the impact of food allergy on the family. In conjunction with health-related QoL measures, it can be used by health care practitioners to target care for patients and evaluate psychological interventions for improvement of food allergy management.
    • Validation of the HADRIAN system using an ATM evaluation case study

      Summerskill, Steve; Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Davis, Peter; Day, Philip N.; Rohan, C.; Birnie, S.; Loughborough University (2010)
      The HADRIAN human modelling system is under development as part of the EPSRC funded AUNT-SUE project. The HADRIAN system aims to foster a 'design for all' ethos by allowing ergonomists and designers to see the effects of different kinds of disability on the physical capabilities of elderly and people with disabilities. This system is based upon the long established SAMMIE system, and uses data collected from 102 people, 79 of whom are registered as disabled, or have age related mobility issues. The HADRIAN system allows three dimensional CAD data of new products to be imported, with a subsequent automated analysis using all of the 102 sample members. The following paper describes the process and results gathered from a validation study using an ATM design as a case study. The results indicated that fine tuning of the behavioural data built into HADRIAN would improve the accuracy of an automated product analysis.
    • Validation of the HADRIAN system using an ATM evaluation case study

      Summerskill, Steve; Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Davis, Peter; Loughborough University (2009)
      The HADRIAN human modelling system is under development as part of the EPSRC funded AUNT-SUE project. The HADRIAN system aims to foster a ‘design for all’ ethos by allowing ergonomists and designers to see the effects of different kinds of disability on the physical capabilities of elderly and disabled people. This system is based upon the long established SAMMIE system, and uses data collected from 102 people, 79 of whom are registered as disabled, or have age related mobility issues. The HADRIAN system allows three dimensional CAD data of new products to be imported, with a subsequent automated analysis using all of the 102 sample members. The following paper describes the process and results gathered from a validation study using an ATM design as a case study. The results indicated that fine tuning of the behavioural data built into HADRIAN would improve the accuracy of an automated product analysis.