• Travelling hopefully: an exploration of the limited possibilities for Level 1 students in the English further education system

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (Taylor and Francis, 01/07/2008)
      This paper discusses the findings of a small?scale qualitative study exploring the aspirations and learning identities of three groups of Level 1 students in two English further education (FE) colleges. Emerging identities are explored in the context of classed and gendered dispositions and the educational positioning of the young people. Empirical sections show that the young peoples lifestyle aspirations have a heavy celebrity influence and that their occupational aspirations have an unreal, dreamlike quality associated with a lack of awareness of the trajectories they would need to follow to achieve their ambitions. Further, the paper argues that whilst the young people are developing identities in which learning, leisure, work and domesticity are synonymous, leisure identities assume the greatest importance to them. The paper concludes that this aspect of their young lives is significant since it provides an escapefrom the mundane drudgery of a low?value vocational programme and the inevitability of a future engaged in low?paid, low?skillled work.
    • Treasuring detritus: Reflections on the wreckage left behind by artistic research

      Pinchbeck, Michael; Jones, Rhiannon; University of Derby; University of Lincoln (Taylor & Francis, 2019-11-21)
      In 2006, Rhiannon Jones and Michael Pinchbeck exhibited fragments from their ongoing practice as research as part of an exhibition at the Surface Gallery (Nottingham). Pinchbeck showed 365 objects wrapped in brown paper and string from a project called The Long and Winding Road that involved driving a car around the country for five years as a venue for one-to-one performance (the car was later immersed in the River Mersey and then crushed before being discarded in Michael Landy’s Art Bin). Jones was showing a video called Archived Actualities that re-traced the routes of 1000 scar stories; accidents shared with her by members of the public. Jones suggests that scars are innately performative through a collision of dialogic triangulation that takes place between the rupturing of skin, the process of scarification and the architectural shifts to sites of accident. This five-year project resulted in a solo exhibition in the UK and the USA where scar story objects were collected and displayed in a gallery context, donated by people who had contributed to the archive, as their stories were retold through a series of live performance works. As part of Pinchbeck’s project, the 365 objects were belongings left behind by his brother, who died in an accident in 1998. The piece explored the invisible scars left behind by grief and the literal baggage that makes manifest loss. The objects that were wrapped up lost their emotional charge until they were revealed again during the crushing of the car at the end of the journey, the emotional wreckage becoming literal, memories mangled like the car that housed his brother’s story. For this article, both writers reflect on the detritus of their practice as research, and how in some way, Pinchbeck’s car and Jones’ scar archive ‘stage the wreckage’ of the events that triggered them. The article explores traces that are embedded into our public presentation of self and other, and are objectified through the act of conversation, in order to ask if objects can carry scars like people carry memories. The article asks what remains after physical and emotional wreckage and proposes that instead of seeing this as sediment of loss we should treasure the detritus. Jones still has the objects donated to her archive that embody the stories she was told. Pinchbeck no longer has the 365 objects his brother left behind or the car that carried them on their journey.
    • Trevorite: Ni-rich spinel formed by metasomatism and desulfurization processes at Bon Accord, South Africa?

      O'Driscoll, Brian; Clay, Patricia L.; Cawthorn, R. Grant; Lenaz, Davide; Adetunji, Jacob; Kronz, Andreas; Keele University; University of Manchester; University of the Witwatersrand; Trieste University; et al. (Mineralogical Society, 2014-02-01)
      The 3.5 Ga Bon Accord Ni deposit occurs within the lowest serpentinized mafic ultramafic lavas of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (South Africa). Though now completely mined out, it comprised a suite of rare Ni-rich minerals that led to its interpretation as either an extraterrestrial body or as an oxidized fragment of Fe-Ni alloy originating from the terrestrial core. In this study, we draw on detailed petrographic observation and mineral chemical data, as well as previous work, to re-evaluate these ideas. The balance of evidence, from thin section (<1 mm) to regional (∼10s of km) scales, appears to support an alternative origin for Bon Accord, possibly as an oxidized Ni-sulfide deposit formed in association with ocean floor komatiite eruptions.
    • Trigeminal neuralgia: Imaging and the patient experience of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain: Findings from an on-line survey of patient experience of MRI imaging.

      de Witt, Julie T; Gallagher, S; University of Derby (2018-10-06)
      Background This is the first study to explore the experience of this group of patients and their experience of having an MRI brain scan. It is also unique in specifically focusing on MRI brain scan alone. This gives a new perspective on the nature of patient-centred service we should be delivering, not only to patients with this rare condition, but perhaps when scanning anyone with a pain condition – or indeed in personalizing an examination for any patient. Aims/Objectives To understand the patient’s lived experience of having an MRI brain scan, to understand what made a positive difference and what the patient would like or expect the radiographer to know about their condition. Methods Qualitative method utilized an online survey (Lime survey) with free text responses and some limited demographic data. Survey was advertised on closed social media group and on National charity website (Trigeminal Neuralgia Association UK). 96 responses were received, with 50 free text responses to the open questions. These were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Five themes emerged, with a number of subthemes within each. These are that there are some good stories, there are some not so good experiences, that care and communication makes a difference, that Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) pain is more than just a headache and finally that we need to be involving our patients in their scan. In describing the experience of having an MRI brain scan it was striking that narratives seemed to be clear cut in terms of ‘good or bad’ , but an interesting key difference seemed to be the perceived ‘kindness’ of the staff. Conclusions A recommendation is given in terms of working with a TN patient and their pain triggers, this is for everyone’s benefit as this is also more likely to result in a timely scan with minimal blur artefacts if the patient’s pain is minimized.
    • True cowmen and commercial farmers: Exploring vets’ and dairy farmers’ contrasting views of ‘good farming’ in relation to biosecurity.

      Shortall, Orla; Sutherland, Lee-Ann; Ruston, Annmarie; Kaler, Jasmeet; University of Nottingham; The James Hutton Institute; University of Derby; Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences, The James Hutton Institute; Craigiebuckler Aberdeen AB15 8QH Scotland, UK; Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences, The James Hutton Institute; Craigiebuckler Aberdeen AB15 8QH UK; College of Health and Social Care; University of Derby, Kedleston Road; Derby DE22 1GB UK; et al. (Wiley, 2017-11-30)
      Responsibility for biosecurity in UK farming is being devolved from government to industry, with a greater emphasis on the veterinarian (vet)‐farmer relationship. Although social science has shown that care for animals is part of ‘good farming’, the British dairy sector sees a need to improve biosecurity. This research uses the good farmer concept to compare how vets and dairy farmers define good farming for biosecurity based on qualitative interviews with 28 vets and 15 dairy farmers in England. The results revealed two conflicting ‘good farmer’ identities: the large, commercial farmer who has the economic capital to invest in biosecurity and veterinary services; and the self‐sufficient stock keeper whose cultural and social capital lead them to manage herd health independently. These identities reflect changing ‘rules of the game’, following Bourdieu's use of the term, and increasing penetration of vets’ cultural capital into the sector. They involve different constructions of risk which need to be recognised within debates about good biosecurity.
    • ‘Trying to bring attention to your body when you’re not sure where it is’: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of drivers and barriers to mindfulness for people with spinal cord injury

      Hearn, Jasmine Heath; Finlay, Katherine Anne; Sheffield, David; University of Derby; Manchester Metropolitan University; The University of Buckingham (Wiley, 2020-08-04)
      Work is beginning to explore the impact of mindfulness in managing the physical and psychological health of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, no previous work has sought to understand what drives people with such conditions to try mindfulness, and what barriers are experienced in accessing mindfulness. An exploratory, qualitative, interview design, utilizing interpretative phe- nomenological analysis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 people with SCI who had experience of mindfulness since sustaining their injury. Verbatim transcripts were analysed using IPA to understand the lived experience of mindfulness post-SCI. Analysis suggested that managing physical and mental health, and viewing mindfulness as proactive and protective were key drivers for exploring mindfulness. However, multiple barriers to accessing opportunities and developing capability impeded engagement. These included the focus on areas of the body that participants had reduced sensation in, physical environments that could not be navigated in a wheelchair, social stigma surrounding the use of mindfulness, and a sense of obligation and risk of failure implied by perceived requirements for engagement. The results demonstrate the need for specific interventions to accom- modate the reduced sensory and physical function experienced by people with neurological conditions and to enhance sense of control and autonomy. In addition, recommendations include minimizing the stigma surrounding mindfulness, and the potentially demotivating impact of the perception of ‘failing’ to engage.
    • Turning assault into a “harmless prank”— teenage perspectives on happy slapping

      Palasinski, Marek; University of Derby (Sage, 2013-05-01)
      The article describes the ways in which 41 adolescents from three large English cities discussed the phenomenon of happy slapping, which is typically defined as recording a physical assault on an unsuspecting victim on a cameraenabled phone for Internet upload. Using discourse analysis, the construal of motivations for its creation and watching is explored, elaborating on social, cultural, and legal implications. The identified repertoires (creation of comedy, denial of grievous bodily harm, accomplice-witness ambiguity, and reflection of postmodern culture) caution against attributing happy slapping just to boredom, as the mainstream British press does and puts spotlight on other factors, like seeking originality and keeping “pranks” under control. Concluding with the apparent similarities between the discursive worlds inhabited by unconvicted adolescents and convicted offenders, this study provides a theoretical platform for further research on the subtle and intriguing overlap.
    • Twittering away - Is Twitter an appropriate adjunctive tool to enhance learning and engagement in higher education?

      Vigurs, Katy; Boath, Elizabeth; Frangos, Juliet; Staffordshire University (Staffordshire University, 2018-04-27)
      Twitter is a social media platform that has been used in teaching and learning. The aim was to explore students’ views of using Twitter as an adjunctive learning tool to provide access to contemporary information, to enhance learning and to generate wider discussion via Twitter backchannel communication. A 17-item Qualtrics questionnaire consisting of open and closed questions was devised specifically for the study. Qualitative data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data via thematic analysis. Participants were a convenience sample of 44 Level 4 Social Welfare Law students who were invited to engage online with the academic and professional community via Twitter. Eleven (25%) students responded to the questionnaire. Four key themes emerged from the qualitative data: Enhancing knowledge; Building academic and professional networks; Time for twitter and the Need for Twitter training. Despite the limitations, the results suggest that if supported by institutional digital scaffolding and training, twitter may be a useful adjunct to traditional physical learning spaces. Further research is r however required to explore the future pedagogic potential of Twitter.
    • Two sides of the same story: staff and student perceptions of the non-native speakers experience of the British academic system

      Hooley, Tristram; Horspool, Philip; University of Leicesster (2006)
      This paper draws on a research and materials development project undertaken at the University of Leicester. The project’s aims were to identify problems encountered by non-native speaking students (NNS) and to offer academic departments a toolkit for overcoming these problems. The paper will discuss the student and staff experience of dealing with linguistic and cultural difficulties and suggest pedagogic and institutional strategies for improving in-sessional support. The paper will suggest that academics frequently have difficulty in diagnosing the nature of the problems that their NNS students have and that a greater focus on language is necessary. The paper will go on to argue that the high number of NNS studying at British universities creates an imperative for academic departments to mainstream the support that they offer for international students. As many of the recommendations for support for NNS are essentially ‘best practice’ teaching and learning they also are likely to have positive knock-on effects for other students.
    • A two-gene balance regulates Salmonella typhimurium tolerance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

      Marsh, Elizabeth K; van den Berg, Maaike C W; May, Robin C; University of Birmingham (Public Library of Science, 2011-03-02)
      Lysozymes are antimicrobial enzymes that perform a critical role in resisting infection in a wide-range of eukaryotes. However, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host we now demonstrate that deletion of the protist type lysozyme LYS-7 renders animals susceptible to killing by the fatal fungal human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, but, remarkably, enhances tolerance to the enteric bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium. This trade-off in immunological susceptibility in C. elegans is further mediated by the reciprocal activity of lys-7 and the tyrosine kinase abl-1. Together this implies a greater complexity in C. elegans innate immune function than previously thought.
    • Twofoldness/threefoldness: Marc Lüders' photopicturen

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars, 2018-11)
      My essay 'Twofoldness/Threefoldness: Marc Lüders' Photopicturen' used as the text accompanying Marc Lüders' exhibition - 'Marc Lüders/Twofoldness' at the Levy Gallery, Hamburg in November 2018.
    • UK pension changes in 2015: some mathematical considerations

      Stubbs, John; Adetunji, Jacob; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2016-06-14)
      This paper presents a mathematical treatment of some of the changes made to pension arrangements by the UK government in 2015. A mathematical model of a pension fund is developed based on three variables: life expectancy of pensioner, interest rates on investments and rates of inflation. The model enables a prospective pensioner to decide, at point of retirement and on the basis of predicted income streams, whether to opt for, (i) a (life) annuity or a draw down scheme, (ii) an inflation proofed (index linked) income or a fixed income and (iii) an immediate income or a deferred income. Numerical examples are provided to add clarity to the financial options available at retirement. On the basis of the numerical examples given, the paper concludes by urging caution on the part of the pensioner before taking an annuity rather than a draw down scheme, an index linked rather than a fixed income and a deferred rather than an immediate pension income. UK pension changes in 2015: some mathematical considerations.
    • The Ukrainian crisis, the Crimean referendum and security implications for the European Union

      Hudson, Robert Charles; University of Derby (University American College, Skopje, 2014-12-01)
    • Un/writing the landscape, re/figuring the body

      Jones, Rhiannon; Kelly, Traci; Klein, Jennifer; Walkington, Helen; Howard, Janice; Pill, Deborah; University of Ohio; University of Derby; Oxford Brookes University; University of Bergen (PABlish, 2020-12)
      As visual artists Kelly and Jones' engagement with writing took a turn away from the production of text. It became a broader visual and performed investigation into site and the materiality of writing and the place of the body as a scripting phenomena that writes itself into being in proximity to myriad otherness. Abandoning any form of recognisable text, the residency became about subverting written language by returning to the gesture, the instinct and the materiality whose mark-making predates fixivity. This area has become the milieu in which our collaboration operates. It is an organic and intermittent collaboration that bubbles in the gaps and suddenly erupts into different spaces and contexts. This publication is the outcome of the practice as research conducted through: Kelly and Jones solo exhibition at The Glass Tank The seers in residence programme by Kelly and Jones Kelly and Jones in conversation with seers - research discussion event Collaboration with University of Ohio, Professor Jennie Klein Bergen Performing Arts, PABlish The publication is an edited series of texts, performative gestures and provocations that has been written and peer reviewed with a foreward by Professor Jennie Klein, University of Ohio.
    • Uncovered – performing everyday clothes

      Penna, Xristina; University of Leeds (Intellect, 01/10/2014)
      Uncovered is an interactive installation based on a simple yet complex performance system that uses the participants’ clothes as a springboard for devising material for the show ad hoc. Everyday clothes are performing in Uncovered and consist the material for the show. They are the objects that tranverse from a ‘silent existence’ to an ‘oral state’ open to appropriation (Barthes [1957] 2009: 131). Gaston Bachelard would argue that ‘immensity is an intimate dimension’ (Bachelard [1958] 1994: 194) and also that ‘immensity is a philosophical category of a daydream’ ([1958] 1994: 183). During an interview session the audience/participant encounters the projected image of one of his or her clothes and re-thinks, rejects, remembers, reflects, resists with this image. The artist makes a rough copy of the garment using white fabric while the sound designer picks up sound from the clothes and composes a short sound piece. The team of three (performer, sound designer and the artist) with the use of projection, live camera feed, sound, the body of the performer and the piece of clothing itself, present a two-minute improvisation to each one of the audience/participants. The audience are invited in an intimate space to daydream and reflect by looking at the image of one of their clothes. In this visual essay I will use the metaphor of zooming in the network-like-texture of a fabric in an attempt to communicate the experience of Uncovered: the layers and immense weaving of thoughts, emotions, memories that was triggered by the delimiting image of the participants’ clothes.
    • Under my (editorial) thumb: hegemonic masculinity and text ownership in the works of the Mexican Onda

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2010)
      Connell and Messerschmidt's article 'Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept' (2005) re-evaluates the popular term to produce 'a more complex model of gender hierarchy' (829). The notion of hierarchy influenced by power redistribution is the foundation of the present study of the works of the Mexican Onda movement. Instead of adopting an expected gender perspective, this article presents a study of text ownership based upon a narratological interpretation of the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a mechanism of controlling the text. The analysis will examine the power struggle between the first-person narrator and editor with a view to determining the effect this struggle has on character (re)creation. The study will employ Ricoeur's interpretation of non-linear narrative, and various studies of transculturation and its effect on the interpretations of literary texts. The texts analysed in this article include the story La tumba (1964) by José Agustín, Gustavo Sainz's novel Obsesivos días circulares (1969), and Parménides García Saldaña's short story 'Goodbye Belinda' from the collection El rey criollo (1971).
    • Under the Western Sky: Essays on the Fiction and Music of Willy Vlautin

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nevada Press, 2018)
      The first original collection of essays examining the work of Willy Vlautin as both musician and novelist, placing it within the contexts of western studies and wider theoretical frames such as critical regionalism, affect theory and cultural studies.
    • Understanding a ‘career in careers’: learning from an analysis of current job and person specifications

      Neary, Siobhan; Marriott, John; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (2014-07)
      The Career Development Institute (CDI) is developing a career progression pathway for the career development sector. This report provides evidence which can inform the creation of such a framework. It is based on an analysis of 214 job and person specifications. These were drawn from all four UK nations and reflect the five CDI constituency groups as well as higher education and the welfare to work sector. Key findings include the following: It was possible to identify six levels of vacancies in the career development sector: entry level; practitioner; advanced practitioner; manager and senior manager; and research and technical support. There were careers vacancies in every UK nation and in every English region. Nearly half of the vacancies were located in London and the South East. Over three-quarters of the job opportunities for the career development workforce were located within careers companies and the education sector. Just less than three quarters of the vacancies were full time positions. A clear majority of vacancies (69%) were permanent positions. Three-quarters of vacancies specified a careers qualification. Many job and person specifications either did not specify the level of the qualification or suggested diverse careers qualifications at different levels. A minority of vacancies did not require any qualifications and a small number did not require any specific careers qualifications. Job and person specifications set out a wide range of duties for careers workers. The most common were providing one to one career information, advice and guidance and organising and delivering group sessions. The behaviour, knowledge and skills most likely to be specified were interpersonal skills, the use of ICT and electronic systems (including CRM systems) and the ability to manage paperwork and work to targets. Salaries varied from £13,400 to £65,000 although the overwhelming majority of those that specified a salary were between £15,001- £35,000. Salary varied according to the level of the job, the sector it was based in and the qualifications that were required. The analysis revealed 103 different job titles. This is a significant increase on the 2009 mapping by LLUK which identified 43 job roles. Careers adviser/advisor was the job title most commonly cited.
    • Understanding advancement

      Ravenhall, Mark; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby, 2009)
      The concept of ‘advancement’ has been central to the debate in relation to the most effective ways of achieving the twin policy goals of high employment alongside high productivity. It is based on how the system looks from the perspective of the individual who often faces multiple barriers in accessing both learning and work. In this way it is linked to the wider agenda of the personalisation of public services. What is different from other approaches is that advancement is also about how support for (and challenge to) the individual is delivered holistically. This involves bringing together what are currently discrete and disparate advice services for: housing, employment, learning, health and benefits/personal finances.This paper explores how the vision of advancement has advanced since first mooted in this context in John Denham’s Fabian Society speech in 2004. It looks at the reform agenda from three perspectives: • The individual; • The workplace; and • The advancement agencies which support them. It concludes by looking at ways of achieving advancement and government’s role in the process through strategic commitments to – segmentation; stimulation; regulation; and capacity building.
    • Understanding and implementing managing diversity in organisations: a study in the retail sector

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham Trent UniversityNottingham, 2003)