• Review of preventative behavioural interventions for dermal and respiratory hazards.

      Lunt, J. A.; Sheffield, David; Bell, N.; Bennett, V.; Morris, L. A.; Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire; University of Derby, Centre for Psychological Research (2011-08)
      No previous systematic review of the evidence base has been undertaken to help occupational health professionals understand how to reliably lower the instance of occupational ill-health through reducing risk-taking behaviour.
    • A review of the diversity and impact of invasive non-native species in tropical marine ecosystems

      Alidoost Salimi, Parisa; Creed, Joel C.; Esch, Melanie M.; Fenner, Douglas; Jaafar, Zeehan; Levesque, Juan C.; Montgomery, Anthony D.; Alidoost Salimi, Mahsa; Edward, J. K. Patterson; Raj, K. Diraviya; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-04-23)
      Tropical marine ecosystems are biologically diverse and economically invaluable. However, they are severely threatened from impacts associated with climate change coupled with localized and regional stressors, such as pollution and overfishing. Non-native species (sometimes referred to as ‘alien’ species) are another major threat facing these ecosystems, although rarely discussed and overshadowed by the other stressors mentioned above. NNS can be introduced accidentally (for example via shipping activities) and/or sometimes intentionally (for aquaculture or by hobbyists). Understanding the extent of the impacts NNS have on native flora and fauna often remains challenging, along with ascertaining when the species in question actually became ‘invasive’. Here we review the status of this threat across key tropical marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, algae meadows, mangroves, and seagrass beds. We aim to provide a baseline of where invasive NNS can be found, when they are thought to have been introduced and what impact they are thought to be having on the native ecosystems they now inhabit. In the appended material we provide a comprehensive list of NNS covering key groups such as macroalgae, sponges, seagrasses and mangroves, anthozoans, bryozoans, ascidians, fishes, and crustaceans.
    • Review of the recent advances in dew point evaporative cooling technology: 3E (energy, economic and environmental) assessments

      cui, yuanlong; Zhu, Jie; Zoras, Stamatis; Liu, Lin; University of Derby; University of Nottingham; Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai, China (Elsevier, 2021-06-17)
      Dew point evaporative cooling (DPEC) technology has been used to produce low temperature air, whose tem perature is even beneath its wet bulb temperature of intake air and close to its dew point temperature. This paper summarizes energy, economic, and environmental (3 E) assessments of the DPEC technology based on experi mental testing, life cycle cost and CO2 emission models. Three vital aspects of the technology energy performance evaluation, including coefficient of performance, cooling capacity and cooling effectiveness, are investigated and compared between two prevalent categories (i.e., cross and counter flow configurations) in different climate conditions, and the hybridization of the DPEC system with dehumidifier and desalination applications is clari fied. Various economic assessment approaches to study the net present value and payback period of the DPEC system are illustrated. The environmental impact evaluation of the DPEC system, including CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions, is conducted. At last, the viewpoints, suggestions and potential future development on the DPEC technology are deliberated.
    • Revised guidance for colleges: Careers England policy commentary 28

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2014-09)
      This is the twenty-eighth in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The note has been prepared for Careers England by Professor Tony Watts.
    • Revisiting the retrospective of the work of Jordan McKenzie.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (20/04/2018)
      The act of art retrospective, specifically that placed within a museum or gallery, is to reflect on, and give knowledge of something past. A retroactive overview of a person’s artistic practice, the retrospective exhibition is backwards facing rather than future focused. As an act that normally specifies finiteness and conclusion a living artist’s retrospective produces an anomaly as a consequence. In 2016 I simultaneously staged the Alternative Document symposium and exhibition. This included Retrospective 2027 by Jordan McKenzie, a living artist, as a keynote performance in the symposium. Positioned as a keynote in the symposium rather than the exhibition it not only offered the retrospective as a representation of the artworks of the living, but also challenged traditional formats of structural placement. Situated within colloquialism rather than exhibition, the aim was to set it adrift from the gallery and the predominantly visual to open it to critical debate. This paper analyses an approach to retrospective that differs from the conventional, as one that is performed, gestural and event-based rather than static and exhibited in a gallery and includes my critical conversation with the artist. It asks what this means for the artwork, the documentary in performance and ephemeral practice, the archive, the exhibition and retrospective in McKenzie’s work. Presented in Documents, Alternatives: a symposium of artistic process and practice, BSAD (Bath), 20 April 2018. The symposium is staged simultaneously with the exhibition Documents, Alternatives (#3) at BSAD gallery, which is open to the public 20th April – 1st May 2018. The exhibition and symposium are part of the Alternative Document, a project by Dr. Angela Bartram, Associate Professor and Head of Arts Research, at University of Derby.
    • The revival of the ancient technique of printing with mordants and dyeing in bi-colourants to achieve contemporary poly-chromic designs

      Wells, Kate; Churn, Kate; University of Derby (NOVA University of Lisbon Campus Caparica / Caparica Portugal, 25/10/2018)
      This paper explores the creation of a range of sustainable patterned fabrics by employing various Bio-colorants (natural dyes) in combination with a range of mordants that have a lesser impact upon the environment to create a poly-chromatic design within single dyeing process. Practice based research was undertaken into dyeing and printing with Madder, Logwood, Weld and Woad or Indigo in combination with a selection of mordants Alum, Copper Acetate, Iron Acetate and Tannins onto a range of fabric bases which includes the new regenerated fibres alongside traditional natural ones as a sustainable option (1, 2). Mordants that have been used from ancient times produce a pattern during the dyeing process. By looking at these historical (3, 4) and traditional applications (5) from across the globe, it was hoped that a more sustainable method of patterning either through printed (screen and block), stencilled or hand-painted techniques could be designed. According to Robinson (6): Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79), writing of the ancient Egyptians, stated that, ‘Garments are painted in Egypt in a wonderful manner, the white clothes being first coated, not with colours but with drugs which absorb the colours. Although the dyeing liquid is one colour, the garment is dyed several colours according to the different properties of the drugs which have been applied to the different parts: nor can this be washed out’ It is thought that this passage was describing madder dye alongside as the various mordants – alum, iron salts and copper salts as they were known at that time (7). Since this ancient time, the application of natural dyes evolved over the centuries into an advanced form of dyeing as this was only form of permanently colouring fabrics until the advent of synthetic dyes by Perkins in 1856. The ‘Art of Dyeing’ became a highly secretive and protected practice with the formation of Dyers Guilds from the 14th c. The technique of the application of different mordants to create more than one colour evolved within the Far East employed initially to produce the ‘Indienne mania’ (Chintz) madder dyed calicos of the 17th c. and 18th c. and later with the development of ‘Turkey Red’ prints, the secrete of which remained undisclosed until the late 18th c. (7). (1) Garcia. 2012, Natural Dye Workshop: Colors Of Provence Using Sustainable Methods, London: Studio Galli. (2) Dean, J, & Casselman, K. 1999, Wild Colour, London: Mitchell Beazley. (3) Bird. 1875. The Dyers Handbook. USA. (4) Hummel, J.J. 1885. The Dyeing of Textile Fabrics. London: Cassell & Company Ltd (5) Bilgrami, N. 1990. Singh jo Ajrak. Pakistan: Department of Culture and Tourism Government of Sindh. (6) Robinson, S. 1969. A History of Dyed Textiles, London: W & J Makckay & Co Ltd. (7) Chenciner, R. 2001. Madder Red: A History of Luxury and Trade. Richmond: Cuzon Press. (8) Storey, J. 1992 The Thames and Hudson Manual of Textile Printing. London: Thames and Hudson.
    • The rhizomatic West: representing the American West in a transnational, global Media Age

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska PressOutsider, 2008)
    • Ricoeur and the hermeneutics of suspicion

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Continuum Bloomsbury, 2009)
      Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005) was one of the most prolific and influential French philosophers of the Twentieth Century. In his enormous corpus of work he engaged with literature, history, historiography, politics, theology and ethics, while debating ‘truth’ and ethical solutions to life in the face of widespread and growing suspicion about whether such a search is either possible or worthwhile. In Ricoeur and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion, Alison Scott-Baumann takes a thematic approach that explores Ricoeur’s lifelong struggle to be both iconoclastic and yet hopeful, and avoid the slippery slope to relativism. Through an examination of the ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’, the book reveals strong continuities throughout his work, as well as significant discontinuities, such as the marked way in which he later distanced himself from the ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’ and his development of new devices in its place, while seeking a hermeneutics of recovery. Scott-Baumann offers a highly original analysis of the hermeneutics of suspicion that will be useful to the fields of philosophy, literature, theology and postmodern social theory.
    • Ricoeur and the negation of happiness

      Scott-Baumann, Alison; University of Derby (Continuum Bloomsbury, 2013-10)
      Ricoeur lectured and wrote for over twenty years on negation ('Do I understand something better if I know what it is not, and what is not-ness?') and never published his extensive writings on this subject. Ricoeur concluded that there are multiple forms of negation; it can, for example, be the other person (Plato), the not knowable nature of our world (Kant), the included opposite (Hegel), apophatic spirituality (Plotinus on not being able to know God) and existential nothingness (Sartre). Ricoeur, working on Kant, Hegel and Sartre, decided that all these forms of negation are incompatible and also fatally flawed because they fail to resolve false binaries of negative: positive. Alison Scott-Baumann demonstrates how Ricoeur subsequently incorporated negation into his linguistic turn, using dialectics, metaphor, narrative, parable and translation in order to show how negation is in us, not outside us: language both creates and clarifies false binaries. He bestows upon negation a strong and central role in the human condition, and its inevitability is reflected in his writings, if we look carefully. Ricoeur and the Negation of Happiness draws on Ricoeur's published works, previously unavailable archival material and many other sources. Alison Scott-Baumann argues that thinking positively is necessary but not sufficient for aspiring to happiness - what is also required is affirmation of negative impulses: we know we are split by contradictions and still try to overcome them. She also demonstrates the urgency of analysing current socio-cultural debates about wellbeing, education and equality, which rest insecurely upon our loose use of the negative as a category mistake.
    • Ricoeur's translation model as a mutual labour of understanding

      Scott-Baumann, Alison (Sage, 2010)
      Ricoeur has written about translation as an ethical paradigm. Translation from one language to another, and within one’s own language, provides both a metaphor and a real mechanism for explaining oneself to the other.Attempting and failing to achieve symmetry between two languages is a manifestation of the asymmetry inherent in human relationships. If actively pursued, translation can show us how to forgive other people for being different from us and thus serves as a paradigm for tolerance. In full acceptance that this will be impossible, Ricoeur uses the model of translation as a way of understanding European integration, with three aspects: translation, shared narrative and shared forgiveness of Europe’s history. These models provide a strong statement about tolerance and become even more significant through their conversation with the negativity that suffuses them. He draws on his knowledge of psychoanalysis to explain that the translator suffers through remembering and through mourning the loss of perfection; there must be acknowledgement of deficiency. This acceptance of imperfection and of limits to success is a key element in Ricoeur’s philosophy and is explored from the 1950s onwards in his study of negativity; denied by phenomenology and explored by Hegel. Negation is vital for understanding the world (this word means this, not that), but it can preclude us from access to meaning when it becomes negativity (this word has no meaning because it is different). Translation can provide the bridge to span the tension between the pathology of denial and different interpretations, and projection of evil into others, which I believe is at the heart of the perceived incompatibilities between Islam and the West. There is a political urgency to this enterprise, given the ‘othering’ of the Muslim world that has replaced the Cold War dichotomies between Communist as ‘other’ and the capitalist world. References to the Muslim as the current ‘other’ will be part of my discussion. As well as seeking to understand Ricoeur’s model of translation, we will examine whether his model works in a world where many speak no Arabic, Urdu or Farsi, or indeed whether it has any relevance for people who do not.
    • Riddum: the sacred word of Sancha Prasad rai, shaman of the Himalayas

      Nicoletti, Martino; Gasgini, Fabrizio; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Castelvecchi Editore - Roma, 2005)
      A book devoted to the mythology of the Kulunge Rai, an ethnic group settled in the East Nepal. The work is enriched by a large series of photos.
    • Riot 1831 1958 1981 2011 in Nottingham.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Nottingham Trent University (New Art Exchange, ADP Riot Tour and L-13.org Prophetic Promotions Press., 2016-09)
      In 2012 New Art Exchange opened its new season with a specially developed session considering the impact of the Nottingham riots one year on. Rhiannon Jones was commissioned by New Art Exchange, Synapse Arts and Nottingham City Council, to design a research project to facilitate conversations between voices of the hard to reach, local community members, youth groups and academics to discuss the effect that the riots has had on the people of Nottingham. This article was commissioned by New Art Exchange 5 years on, in 2016, was commissioned review the impact of Rhiannon Jones' 2012 project Mediated Riots, in order to revisit the lasting impact of the methodological findings and reflect on the research questions that the project raised. It questions the value of reflexivity, and the politics of socially and dialogically engaged research projects. The article was included in the publication that toured with ADP Riot Tour to 36 sites across the UK on a nationwide tour. The ADP was shown outside Nottingham's New Art Exchange as part of their exhibitions 'A Rebel Scene' + 'Fighting Walls' exploring civil resistance, activist space and political defiance. As part of the stop Jimmy Cauty and L-13's Steve Lowe took part in a talk describing the process of how the ADP was made and how the ADP Riot Tour went from the word RIOT on a map to reality. The ADP was in Nottingham from 26th September - 10th October.
    • River-Film: Cine installation

      Harris, Philip; University of Derby (2019-06-26)
      A moving-image installation of the River Derwent using analogue cine film and multiple projectors Installation staged for the Landscapes and Legacy Conference, University of Derby, 26th June 2019. River-Film is a work in progress that explores the qualities of the River Derwent as both an object of nature and a human resource using the medium of cine film. The Derwent has been filmed from its rising at Bleaklow and a number of stages throughout its course culminating with its merging with the River Trent, south of the City of Derby. The physical substance of analogue cine film as opposed to the material remoteness of digital video has been employed and explored for its physical properties: flexible, fluvial and fragile. The films are presented in loops of up to 10 metres using multiple projectors. The installation of River-Film is a highly embodied experience that requires the viewer to negotiate the presence of machinery, loops of film and other viewers, as film footage rotates through each projector in an unrepeatable combination of imagery. As such, the work reflects the diverse topographical environments of the Derwent, the inheritance of a history of industrialisation, and the cycle of natural processes.
    • Roadside

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (Museum Ostwall im Dortmunder U, 2014)
      The animals driven to death on the roads remain lying until the tires are all to remove mortal remains, dedicated to the art historian, researcher, author and artist Steve Baker in his roadkill series. Baker started when he got one run over rabbits on a country road in Norfolk / UK saw. This impression occupied him so much back then that after half mile back to the accident site. He leaned over his bike so he did that animal could directly record from above with his camera. In the same formal rigor, with a view from above on the dead animals and the since then, bicycle pedals have made Baker his depressing recordings.
    • 'Robert Burstow talks to Clement Greenberg'

      Burstow, Robert; University of Derby (Frieze Publishing Ltd, 2013)
    • The role and impact of executive coaching in the Maltese public sector

      Borg Ellul, Duncan; Wond, Tracey; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-04-06)
      The present study aims to conduct a critical review of an existing set of practices within the Maltese public sector. This study is based on interpretivism (people-centred approach) embedded in a pragmatic research paradigm (the use of mixed methods). Misconceptions about the role and practice of executive coaching in Malta relates to the similar roles ascribed to mentoring, supervision, therapy, consultation, coaching, audit and watchdog under the misnomer of “coaching”. The main contribution of this research is to the community of professional practitioners as well as to the Maltese central government to improve managerial effectiveness in the Maltese public sector with several endorsed policy-level recommendations presented in the study. The results suggest a restructuring of a well-defined, structures, systems and dynamics within the Maltese public administration, the ability by senior management including senior public officers (SPOs) to recognise high-potential talents, the need to expand leadership capacity, the establishment of a professional coaching body and a national coaching network framework. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the role and impact of executive coaching in the Maltese public sector using quantitative and qualitative empirical data.
    • The role and relevance of theory in careers professionalisation and practice

      Lauder, Lydia; Neary, Siobhan; The Open University; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-04-11)
      A new qualification benchmark, the Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF) Diploma Level 6 in Career Guidance and Development was established in the UK in 2011. This study was conducted to ascertain whether a theoretical nexus is necessary for practice and how this could contribute to the professionalisation of the adult careers sector in England. The study was undertaken with practitioners, all of whom had trained either through the work-based competency route or the academic route. Practitioners were asked to consider their theoretical modalities and how this influenced the embedding of theory within their professional practice. Analysis of survey and case study data revealed that degrees of exposure to theory during initial training affect capacities for theoretical integration during ongoing practice and development.
    • The role and value of medicines management work packages 1 & 2

      Giles, David; Lewis, Rachel; Ward, Derek; University of Derby (Southern Derbyshire County Council, 2017-07-28)
      Work Package 1 presents the findings and recommendations from the analysis of Southern Derbyshire’s Medicine Management “Work Log” SharePoint data set. The report provides an overview of the work done by the Medicine Management team. The current form and function of the SharePoint data set are also discussed. The analysis of the dataset (Annex Document) provide context for the recommendations presented, which are based on six case studies selected by Southern Derbyshire Medicines Management team. Work package 2 presents the findings and recommendations from our evaluation of the project to embed Clinical Pharmacists in Patient Facing roles within the ‘Belper Five’ group of practices. This element of the report continues to explore the value of medicines management from the viewpoint of the expanded role of the patient facing Clinical Pharmacists within a general practice setting.
    • The role of age and gender in the retail service encounter

      Foster, Carley; Resnick, Sheilagh; Nottingham Trent University (2011)
      Research typically explores the service encounter in relation to the soft and hard skills of front line staff, yet has neglected the role the visible diversity of sales staff have on the interactions between the service deliverer and receiver. This paper therefore attempts to address this gap in knowledge by reporting on how the age and gender of customer facing staff can influence customer evaluations of the retail service encounter in a health and beauty retailer. An analysis of qualitative interviews with forty customers and twenty store staff propose that customers attempt to 'match' and 'mirror' the age and gender of sales staff with their expectations of who should deliver good retail service during the retail service encounter.
    • The role of co-creation in corporate branding: the case of a Higher Education Institution

      Spry, L.; Foster, Carley; Pich, Christopher; Nottingham Trent University (2015)